Eileen Filler-Corn

Eileen Robin Filler-Corn (born June 5, 1964) is an American politician currently serving as the 56th Speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates. Since 2010 she has served in the Virginia House of Delegates, representing the 41st district in the Fairfax County suburbs of Washington, D.C. She is a member of the Democratic Party.[1] She is also the first woman and Jewish person to serve as Speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates.[2]

Eileen Filler-Corn
Eileen Filler-Corn (cropped).jpg
56th Speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates
Assumed office
January 8, 2020
Preceded byKirk Cox
Minority Leader of the Virginia House of Delegates
In office
January 1, 2019 – January 8, 2020
Preceded byDavid Toscano
Succeeded byTodd Gilbert
Member of the Virginia House of Delegates
from the 41st district
Assumed office
March 3, 2010
Preceded byDavid W. Marsden
Personal details
Born
Eileen Robin Filler

(1964-06-05) June 5, 1964 (age 55)
New York City, New York, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Robert Corn
Children2
EducationIthaca College (BA)
American University (JD)
WebsiteOfficial website

Personal LifeEdit

Filler-Corn was born in New York City and grew up in West Windsor, New Jersey graduating from West Windsor-Plainsboro High School in 1982.[3][4] She graduated from Ithaca College, Ithaca NY with a B.A. degree in 1986. She received her J.D. degree from American University Washington College of Law in Washington, DC in 1993. [5] In the time between her two college stints, she worked on Democrat Jeff Laurenti's unsuccessful 1986 campaign to defeat incumbent Republican congressman Chris Smith.[4] She and her husband Robert Corn, President of Landmark Strategies, Inc., a national issue advocacy, grassroots engagement and campaign voter contact firm, have two children. [6]

CareerEdit

Filler-Corn served as director of intergovernmental affairs in the administrations of Virginia governors Mark Warner and Tim Kaine. Since 2007 she has been director of government relations at Albers & Company, a national lobbying and consulting firm in Arlington.

On January 1, 2019, Filler-Corn became Leader of the House Democratic Caucus, and was the first woman to lead a caucus in the 400-year history of the Virginia House of Delegates.[7]

Filler-Corn serves on the House committees on Commerce and Labor, Finance, and Rules. She also serves on the Joint Commission on Transportation Accountability, Health Insurance Reform Commission, Joint Commission on Technology and Science, Virginia Commission on Intergovernmental Cooperation, and the Transportation Public-Private Partnership Steering Committee.[8][1]

On November 9, 2019, following elections where the Democratic Party of Virginia won control of the House, the incoming caucus officially nominated her for the position of Speaker in the 161st General Assembly.[9] She will be the first woman ever to hold the position, as well as the first Jewish Speaker.

Filler-Corn first ran for the 41st district seat in 1999, but was unsuccessful. She won the seat in a 2010 special election to replace David W. Marsden, who had himself won a special election to the Senate of Virginia the month before.[10][11] Jim Dillard, the Republican incumbent who defeated Filler-Corn in 1999, endorsed her candidacy in 2010 because of her opponent's remarks that funding for Fairfax County Public Schools was "excessive".[12]

Filler-Corn won by only 37 votes. She was sworn in on March 3, 2010 after her opponent dropped his plans to request a recount.[13]

On January 1, 2019, Filler-Corn became Leader of the House Democratic Caucus. She is the first woman to lead a caucus in the 400-year history of the Virginia House of Delegates.[7]

In 2019, Filler-Corn introduced and passed House bills on a variety of issues, from expanding education on the topic of consent in schools to exempting disabled veterans from motor vehicle property tax.[14]

On January 8, 2020, the new Democratic majority elected Filler-Corn Speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates. She is both the first woman and Jewish person to serve in this position.[2]

Legislative issuesEdit

In 2019, one of Filler-Corn's top priorities has been preventing gun violence. She and other Democrats formed a “Safe Virginia Initiative” task force, which she co-chairs, to examine the issue.[15]

In response to the refusal by Republican delegates to consider gun safety legislation, she has stated that action on gun safety must be taken in order to prioritize school safety.[16]

The Virginia Education Association Fund for Children and Public Education has endorsed her because she has consistently voted for legislation supporting public education.[17]

Electoral historyEdit

Date Election Candidate Party Votes %
Virginia House of Delegates, 41st district
Nov 2, 1999[18] General J H Dillard II Republican 7,752 58.52
E R Filler-Corn Democratic 5,482 41.38
Write Ins 13 0.10
Incumbent won; Republican hold
Mar 2, 2010[19] Special Eileen Filler-Corn Democratic 5,758 50.13
Kerry D. Bolognese Republican 5,721 49.80
Write Ins 7 0.06
David W. Marsden was elected to the Senate; Democratic hold
Nov 8, 2011[20] General Eileen Filler-Corn Democratic 11,959 68.01
Mike R. Kane Libertarian 5,509 31.33
Write Ins 114 0.64
Nov 5, 2013[21] General Eileen Filler-Corn Democratic 15,030 56.9
Fredy Burgos Republican 10,392 39.41
Christopher DeCarlo Independent 944 3.58
Write Ins 37 0.1
Nov 3, 2015[22] General Eileen Filler-Corn Democratic 12,175 92.8
Write Ins 945 7.2
Nov 7, 2017[23] General Eileen Filler-Corn Democratic 22,985 90.8
Write Ins 2,317 9.2
Nov 5, 2019[24] General Eileen Filler-Corn Democratic 17,302 71.58
John Michael Wolfe Independent 4,568 18.90
Rachel Mace Libertarian 1,875 7.76
Write Ins 428 1.77

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Delegates Eileen Filler-Corn". virginiageneralassembly.gov. Commonwealth of Virginia. Retrieved 30 December 2016.
  2. ^ a b https://www.voanews.com/usa/newly-empowered-virginia-democrats-promise-action
  3. ^ Gregory S. Schneider. "A 400-year first: Filler-Corn breaks many barriers as new Democratic leader in Virginia’s House." Washington Post, January 2, 2019. [1]
  4. ^ a b Wildstein, David (November 9, 2019). "New Virginia House Speaker is New Jerseyan who worked to oust Chris Smith in 1986". New Jersey Globe. Retrieved November 21, 2019.
  5. ^ Rachel Hatzipanagos. "Profile: Delegate Eileen Filler-Corn, 41st District." Fairfax Station Patch, August 18, 2011. [2]
  6. ^ "Eileen Filler-Corn's Biography." VoteSmart.org, [3]
  7. ^ a b Schneider, Gregory S. (December 27, 2018). "A 400-year first: Filler-Corn breaks many barriers as new Democratic leader in Virginia's House". The Washington Post. Retrieved October 31, 2019.
  8. ^ "LIS Virginia". Retrieved October 31, 2019.
  9. ^ "Eileen Filler-Corn is the first woman to be nominated for Speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates". 8News. 2019-11-09. Retrieved 2019-11-09.
  10. ^ "Del. Dave Marsden Wins 37th State Senate Special Election". Fairfax County Democratic Party. January 13, 2010. Archived from the original on August 16, 2011. Retrieved March 4, 2010.
  11. ^ "VA State House 041 - Special Election Results". Our Campaigns. Retrieved March 4, 2010.
  12. ^ Kravitz, Derek (February 21, 2010). "Democrat in special election for Fairfax House seat nabs endorsement from ex-rival". voices.washingtonpost.com. Retrieved May 26, 2019.
  13. ^ Kravitz, Derek (March 3, 2010). "No recount in close Virginia House race". The Washington Post. Retrieved March 18, 2010.
  14. ^ "LIS Virginia". Retrieved October 31, 2019.
  15. ^ Schneider, Gregory S. (December 27, 2018). "A 400-year first: Filler-Corn breaks many barriers as new Democratic leader in Virginia's House". The Washington Post. Retrieved October 31, 2019.
  16. ^ Albiges, Marie (Feb 14, 2019). "On 1-year anniversary of Parkland shooting, Virginia Democrats highlight failed gun reform bills". Daily Press. Retrieved October 31, 2019.
  17. ^ "General Assembly". Virginia Education Association. 2019. Retrieved October 31, 2019.
  18. ^ "Election Results - House of Delegates - Nov 1999 Gen Election". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on 2012-12-28. Retrieved 2013-06-03.
  19. ^ "March 2010 House of Delegates Special Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on 2010-10-14. Retrieved 2013-06-03.
  20. ^ "November 2011 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on 2013-06-16. Retrieved 2013-06-03.
  21. ^ Virginia House of Delegates elections, 2013. Ballotpedia.
  22. ^ Virginia House of Delegates elections, 2015. Ballotpedia.
  23. ^ Virginia House of Delegates elections, 2017. Ballotpedia.
  24. ^ "Virginia Election Results: November 5, 2019". The Virginia Public Access Project. Retrieved 2019-11-08.

External linksEdit

Virginia House of Delegates
Preceded by
David Toscano
Minority Leader of the Virginia House of Delegates
2019–2020
Succeeded by
Todd Gilbert
Political offices
Preceded by
Kirk Cox
Speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates
2020–present
Incumbent