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Edward Loch, 2nd Baron Loch

Major-General Edward Douglas Loch, 2nd Baron Loch CB CMG MVO DSO (4 April 1873 – 14 August 1942) was a senior British Army officer and peer.

Edward Douglas Loch, 2nd Baron Loch
Born(1873-04-04)4 April 1873
Died14 August 1942(1942-08-14) (aged 69)
London
Buried
Allegiance United Kingdom
Service/branchCape Colonial Forces
British Army
Years of service1893–1922
RankMajor-General
UnitGrenadier Guards
Commands held110th Infantry Brigade
Battles/warsSudan Campaign
Second Boer War
First World War
AwardsDistinguished Service Order
Member of the Royal Victorian Order
Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George
Companion of the Order of the Bath
Croix d'Officier of the Légion d'Honneur (france
RelationsHenry Loch, 1st Baron Loch
Other workCaptain of the Yeomen of the Guard
Deputy Lieutenant of Suffolk
Chairman, Greyhound Racing Association

After serving in Cape Colonial Forces in South Africa he joined the Grenadier Guards in 1893. He first saw active service in the Sudan Campaign in 1898, receiving the first of many decorations. He served on the staff during the Second Boer War, and was further honoured. In 1911, in addition to his army duties, he became a member of the Royal Household of the United Kingdom. During the First World War, he initially continued to serve in staff positions, but commanded a brigade later in the war before returning to the staff. He received further decorations, both British and foreign.

After his retirement from the army in 1922, he became Deputy Lieutenant of Suffolk and undertook various other public and charitable duties. He was also Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard and chairman of the Greyhound Racing Association.

Early life and military careerEdit

Loch was the son of Henry Loch, 1st Baron Loch, and his wife Elizabeth Villiers, daughter of the Hon. EE Villiers and niece of the 4th Earl of Clarendon. He was educated at Winchester College.[1][2] He then went to the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope and served in the locally raised militia, the Cape Colonial Forces, rising to the rank of lieutenant. He transferred to the regular British Army on 3 May 1893 when he was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Grenadier Guards.[3] He was promoted to lieutenant on 12 May 1897.[4] He fought in the Sudan Campaign in 1898, being Mentioned in Despatches for his part in the Battle of Omdurman,[5] and awarded the Distinguished Service Order on 15 November 1898.[6] He was also awarded the Khedive's Star and clasp.[1]

Boer WarEdit

Loch was seconded from his regiment to the staff on 9 October 1899,[7] serving as divisional signalling officer, South African Field Force in the Second Boer War.[8] He was promoted captain on 28 January 1900,[9] this was subsequently backdated to 30 November 1899.[10] He inherited the title Baron Loch on the death of his father in 1900. He was Mentioned in Despatches again in April 1901,[11] and on 19 April it was announced he would receive a brevet promotion to major, dated 29 November 1900.[12] He participated in the battles of Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein, was badly wounded and received the Queen's South Africa Medal with four clasps.[1]

Loch returned to regimental duty in the Grenadier Guards on 23 January 1902,[13] and took part in a special diplomatic mission to promote British interests in Morocco in early 1902.[14] He was appointed a Member of the Royal Victorian Order (MVO) on 30 May 1902, following the presentation by King Edward VII of State colours to the King′s Company of the Grenadier Guards.[15][16] The following year, he was appointed regimental adjutant on 26 January 1903,[17] and held the post until 1 July 1905.[18] On 22 January 1908 he began the staff course at Staff College, Camberley,[19] and he was promoted substantive major on 15 August 1908.[20] He was brigade major of the 3rd Infantry Brigade from 12 April 1910 to 16 August 1911,[21] when he became a General Staff Officer (GSO), Grade 2 at the War Office.[22] On 4 December 1911 he became Lord-in-waiting to King George V[23] and he received brevet lieutenant-colonelcy on 10 May 1913.[24] He left the War Office on 12 April 1914.[25]

First World WarEdit

After the outbreak of the First World War Loch served with the BEF Staff in August 1914.[26] He was liaison officer between GHQ and Smith-Dorrien's II Corps.[27] On 16 December 1914 was appointed GSO Grade 1.[28]

Loch was given substantive promotion to lieutenant-colonel on 13 March 1915.[29] By 27 May he was a temporary brigadier-general and had been appointed Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George.[30] He received a brevet colonelcy on 1 January 1916.[31] He served as chief of staff in VI Corps.[32] He received the Croix d'Officier of the Légion d'Honneur in 1917.[33] On 22 July 1917 he was given command of 110th Infantry Brigade.[34][35] He was appointed Companion of the Order of the Bath in the 1918 New Year Honours.[36] He returned to the staff on 16 May 1918.[37] He was promoted major-general "for valuable services rendered in connection with the War" in the 1919 New Year Honours.[38] During the war he was Mentioned in Despatches a further five times.[39][40][41][42][43]

RetirementEdit

Loch retired from the army in 1922. He was appointed a Deputy Lieutenant of Suffolk on 27 February 1922, when he was living at Stoke College, Stoke-by-Clare, Suffolk.[44] From 1924 to 1925 he was Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard.[1][45] He also became president of the Legion of Frontiersmen.[46][47] He was still in the Reserve of Officers at the outbreak of the Second World War, but was not recalled for service.[48] However, when the Home Guard was formed, he served as an Area Commander, despite being over-age, and this position being equivalent in rank only to a brigadier.[1]

In 1927, Loch became chairman of the Greyhound Racing Association. In 1931 this involved him in the case of Mick the Miller, which led to a controversial rerun of the Greyhound Derby.[49] He became Captain of the Yeoman of the Guard again in 1929.[50] In 1931 he took part in the America's Cup on the yacht Candide.[51]

Loch had an estate in Suffolk and was an alderman on West Suffolk County Council. Other positions he held included chairman of the United Service Fund, chairman of governors of Dulwich College and associate joint treasurer for University College, London.[45]

FamilyEdit

Loch married Lady Margaret Louisa Lizzie Compton, daughter of William Compton, 5th Marquess of Northampton, on 6 June 1905. They had two sons and three daughters, and he was succeeded by George Loch, 3rd Baron Loch.[2] He died in a London hospital on 14 August 1942,[1] his funeral service was at the Guards Chapel, Wellington Barracks, London on 20 August 1942, followed by burial at Stoke-by-Clare.[52]

 
The grave of Edward Loch, 2nd Baron Loch, in the churchyard of St John the Baptist, Stoke-by-Clare
 
Memorial to Edward Loch, 2nd Baron Loch, in the church of St John the Baptist, Stoke-by-Clare

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Major-General Lord Loch—Distinguished career of active service". Obituaries. The Times (49316). London. 17 August 1942. col E, p. 6.
  2. ^ a b the Peerage.com
  3. ^ "No. 26397". The London Gazette. 2 May 1893. p. 2553.
  4. ^ "No. 26854". The London Gazette. 18 May 1897. p. 2754.
  5. ^ "No. 27009". The London Gazette. 30 September 1898. pp. 5726–5730.
  6. ^ "No. 27023". The London Gazette. 15 November 1898. p. 6689.
  7. ^ "No. 27129". The London Gazette. 24 October 1899. p. 6385.
  8. ^ "No. 27126". The London Gazette. 13 October 1899. p. 6179.
  9. ^ "No. 27165". The London Gazette. 16 February 1900. p. 1077.
  10. ^ "No. 27247". The London Gazette. 16 November 1900. p. 7020.
  11. ^ "No. 27305". The London Gazette. 16 April 1901. p. 2597.
  12. ^ "No. 27306". The London Gazette. 19 April 1901. pp. 2703–2705.
  13. ^ "No. 27456". The London Gazette. 22 July 1902. p. 4672.
  14. ^ "Latest intelligence – Morocco". The Times (36663). London. 13 January 1902. p. 6.
  15. ^ "Court Circular". The Times (36782). London. 31 May 1902. p. 8.
  16. ^ "No. 27440". The London Gazette. 6 June 1902. p. 3681.
  17. ^ "No. 27528". The London Gazette. 24 February 1903. p. 1217.
  18. ^ "No. 27813". The London Gazette. 4 July 1905. p. 4630.
  19. ^ "No. 28107". The London Gazette. 7 February 1908. p. 893.
  20. ^ "No. 28170". The London Gazette. 21 August 1908. p. 6147.
  21. ^ "No. 28358". The London Gazette. 19 April 1910. p. 2679.
  22. ^ "No. 28526". The London Gazette. 29 August 1911. p. 6373.
  23. ^ "No. 28557". The London Gazette. 5 December 1911. p. 9175.
  24. ^ "No. 28717". The London Gazette. 9 May 1913. p. 3348.
  25. ^ "No. 28828". The London Gazette. 5 May 1914. p. 3664.
  26. ^ Robbins 2005, p116
  27. ^ Jeffery 2006, p139
  28. ^ "No. 29023". The London Gazette (Supplement). 29 December 1914. pp. 1195–11201.
  29. ^ "No. 29139". The London Gazette (Supplement). 20 April 1915. p. 3933.
  30. ^ "No. 29226". The London Gazette (Supplement). 9 July 1915. p. 6801.
  31. ^ "No. 29438". The London Gazette (Supplement). 11 January 1916. p. 568.
  32. ^ Stephen Badsey,Doctrine and reform in the British cavalry 1880–1918 p. 267
  33. ^ "No. 30184". The London Gazette (Supplement). 13 July 1917. pp. 7092–7093.
  34. ^ "No. 30260". The London Gazette (Supplement). 28 August 1917. p. 9006.
  35. ^ "Divisional and Staff Commands", 21st Division 1914–18...a divisional history
  36. ^ "No. 30450". The London Gazette (Supplement). 28 December 1917. p. 2.
  37. ^ "No. 30728". The London Gazette (Supplement). 4 June 1918. p. 6661.
  38. ^ "No. 31097". The London Gazette (Supplement). 31 December 1918. p. 87.
  39. ^ "No. 29890". The London Gazette. 20 October 1914. p. 8377.
  40. ^ "No. 29422". The London Gazette (Supplement). 31 December 1915. p. 7.
  41. ^ "No. 29890". The London Gazette (Supplement). 2 January 1917. p. 198.
  42. ^ "No. 30072". The London Gazette (Supplement). 15 May 1917. p. 4749.
  43. ^ "No. 30421". The London Gazette (Supplement). 7 December 1917. p. 12916.
  44. ^ "No. 32635". The London Gazette. 10 March 1922. p. 2048.
  45. ^ a b Captains of the Yeoman of the Guard
  46. ^ The Frontiersmen Historian
  47. ^ "No. 33882". The London Gazette. 11 November 1932. p. 7175.
  48. ^ "No. 34828". The London Gazette. 9 April 1940. p. 2140.
  49. ^ "Dog days—Adapted from Michael Tanner's The Legend of Mick the Miller, Sporting Icon of the Depression", The Observer, Sunday 4 January 2004.
  50. ^ "Government appointments", The Sydney Morning Herald, 26 June 1929.
  51. ^ "Americas Cup – Loch and his crew 1931", Imagestate.
  52. ^ "Funeral—Major-General Lord Loch". Deaths. The Times (49320). London. 21 August 1942. col C, p. 7.

External linksEdit

Political offices
Preceded by
Lord Hylton
Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard
1924
Succeeded by
Lord Desborough
Preceded by
Lord Desborough
Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard
1929–1931
Succeeded by
Lord Strathcona
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Henry Loch
Baron Loch
1900–1942
Succeeded by
George Loch