Edward Finch (diplomat)

Edward Finch-Hatton (c.1697 – 16 May 1771) of Kirby Hall, near Rockingham, Northamptonshire, was a British diplomat and politician who sat in the House of Commons for 41 years from 1727 to 1768.

Early lifeEdit

 
Kirby Hall

Finch was born Hon. Edward Finch, 5th son of Daniel Finch, 2nd Earl of Nottingham, and of his second wife, Hon. Anne Hatton, daughter and in her issue sole heiress of Christopher Hatton, 1st Viscount Hatton.[1] He was educated at a school at Isleworth and was admitted at Trinity College, Cambridge on 10 October 1713, aged 16, where he obtained an M.A. in 1718.[2] He then went on the Grand Tour from 1720 to 1723, visiting France, Italy and Hanover.[3]

Diplomatic and political careerEdit

In 1724, Finch began a diplomatic career, representing Great Britain as envoy-extraordinary to the imperial diet of Regensburg in the winter of 1724 to 1725, then successively as Minister to Poland, Sweden and Russia between 1725 and 1742. He was returned as Member of Parliament for Cambridge University at the 1727 British general election. He spent the longest period as minister in Stockholm, from 1728 to 1739 and is recorded as only voting once in Parliament over that period although he was returned for Cambridge University again in 1734 and 1741. On his return to England in 1742, he was appointed groom of the bedchamber to the King, a post he held despite changes of government until 1756. He spoke on the Address on 16 November 1742, giving an account of all his negotiations and spoke against an opposition motion of 6 December 1743 for discontinuing the Hanoverian troops on British pay. He was returned unopposed again at the 1747 British general election.[4]

At the 1754 general election Finch was returned unopposed for Cambridge University, and stood unsuccessfully for Rutland. For the rest of his career he generally supported the current Administration. He became Master of the Robes and Keeper of the Privy Purse in June 1757 and Surveyor of the King's Private Roads in November 1760.[3] He was returned again in 1761 but declined standing at the 1768.[5]

Later life and legacyEdit

Finch married Elizabeth Palmer, daughter of Sir Thomas Palmer, 4th Baronet, of Wingham on 9 September 1746. In 1764, took the additional surname Hatton in accordance with the will of his great aunt Anne Hatton,[3] when he inherited property from her.

Finch and his wife had two sons and three daughters. Their eldest son George Finch-Hatton became an MP, and was succeeded in turn by his own son George Finch-Hatton, who became the 10th Earl of Winchilsea.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Burke's Peerage (1939 edn), s.v. Winchilsea, Earl.
  2. ^ "Finch, Edward (FNC713E)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  3. ^ a b c [Anon.], ‘Hatton, Edward Finch- (1697?–1771)’, rev. R. D. E. Eagles, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, (Oxford University Press, 2004) [1], accessed 12 Oct 2008
  4. ^ "FINCH, Hon. Edward (?1697-1771), of Kirby Hall, nr. Rockingham, Northants". History of Parliament Online (1715-1754). Retrieved 22 February 2019.
  5. ^ "FINCH (afterwards FINCH HATTON), Hon. Edward (?1697-1771), of Kirby Hall, nr. Rockingham, Northants". History of Parliament Online (1754-1790). Retrieved 22 February 2019.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Thomas Willoughby
Dixie Windsor
Member of Parliament for Cambridge University
with Thomas Townshend

1727–1768
Succeeded by
Charles Yorke
Thomas Townshend
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
?
Envoy-extraordinary to the Imperial Diet of Regensburg
1724–1725
Succeeded by
?
Preceded by
?
British Minister to Poland
1725–1727
Succeeded by
?
Preceded by
Stephen Poyntz
British Ambassador to Sweden
1728–1739
Succeeded by
?
Preceded by
Claudius Rondeau
British Envoy to Russia
1739–1742
Succeeded by
Melchior Guy-Dickens
Court offices
Preceded by
Augustus Schutz
Master of the Robes
1757–1760
Succeeded by
Hon. James Brudenell
Keeper of the Privy Purse
1757–1760
Succeeded by
The Earl of Bute
Preceded by
Sir Henry Erskine, Bt.
Surveyor of the King's Private Roads
1760–1771
Succeeded by
Thomas Whateley