Edmonton-Glenora

Edmonton-Glenora is a provincial electoral district for the Legislative Assembly of Alberta, Canada. It is located north of the North Saskatchewan River in Edmonton.

Edmonton-Glenora
Alberta electoral district
Edmonton-Glenora 2017.svg
Edmonton-Glenora within the City of Edmonton, 2017 boundaries
Provincial electoral district
LegislatureLegislative Assembly of Alberta
MLA
 
 
 
Sarah Hoffman
New Democratic
District created1971
First contested1971
Last contested2019

The electoral district, as defined by the Electoral Divisions Act, 2003, encompasses an area that includes, in addition to the neighbourhood of Glenora, the neighbourhoods of Britannia Youngstown, Canora, Grovenor, High Park, Inglewood, Mayfield, McQueen, North Glenora, Westmount and Woodcroft as well.

HistoryEdit

The electoral district was created in the 1971 boundary redistribution primarily out of the old Edmonton West district.

The 2010 boundary redistribution saw the riding significantly change boundaries on its northern and western sides. The northern boundary was shifted from 118 Avenue to Yellowhead Trail in land that was part of Edmonton-Calder. The western boundary which previously ran along 170 Street now runs north east along Mayfield Road to 111 Ave and then runs North on 149 Street ceding a large portion of land to Edmonton-Meadowlark.

Boundary historyEdit

Representation historyEdit

Members of the Legislative Assembly for Edmonton-Glenora
Assembly Years Member Party
See Edmonton West 1963-1971
17th 1971–1975 Lou Hyndman Progressive Conservative
18th 1975–1979
19th 1979–1982
20th 1982–1986
21st 1986–1989 Nancy MacBeth
22nd 1989–1993
23rd 1993–1997 Howard Sapers Liberal
24th 1997–2001
25th 2001–2004 Drew Hutton Progressive Conservative
26th 2004–2008 Bruce Miller Liberal
27th 2008–2012 Heather Klimchuk Progressive Conservative
28th 2012–2015
29th 2015–2019 Sarah Hoffman New Democratic
30th 2019–present

The electoral district was created in the 1971 boundary redistribution from the old riding of Edmonton West. That electoral district first elected a Social Credit MLA when it was created in 1963 and elected Progressive Conservative candidate Lou Hyndman to his first term in 1967.

The first election held in 1971 in the district saw Hyndman run for his second term in office. He would win a near landslide taking almost 60% of the popular vote in a very high turnout that hasn't been equaled since with over 80% of electors coming out to vote. His party would form government and Hyndman would be appointed to cabinet in the government of Peter Lougheed.

Hyndman would win his third term in office with the highest percentage of popular vote in his career in the 1975 election. He would defeat future NDP MLA Alex McEachern taking almost 75% of the popular vote. Hyndman would go on to serve two more terms in office. He would keep his cabinet post in the final year of his fifth term when Premier Don Getty came to power and retired from office at dissolution of the assembly in 1986.

The second representative for the riding was Progressive Conservative Nancy MacBeth who won her first election in 1986 with just over half the popular vote. She would be appointed to cabinet in her first term under Premier Don Getty and serve in cabinet until 1992. MacBeth ran for a second term in 1989 and won a second term with a slightly reduced majority. She decided to run for leadership of the Progressive Conservative party in 1992. She waged a tough battle against Ralph Klein but was defeated. Macbeth did not return to cabinet when Klein came to power and did not run for re-election in 1993.

The Alberta Liberal party surged on a wave of support in Edmonton in the 1993 general election that saw the party sweep every seat. Glenora chose Liberal candidate Howard Sapers as the third MLA for the riding. He would be re-elected to a second term with a reduced majority in 1997 and defeated on a bid for his third term in 2001.

Drew Hutton became the first candidate in the riding to knock out a sitting incumbent. He won office in the 2001 election under the Progressive Conservative banner. Hutton only lasted a term in office before losing his seat back to the Liberals in 2004.

The 2004 election was an electoral anomaly. Liberal candidate Bruce Miller won the district despite his party losing 9 points from the last election. Incumbent Drew Hutton finished a distant third while NDP candidate Larry Booi who surged into second place with a record level of support under the NDP banner.

Miller was defeated in the 2008 election despite gaining popular support since being elected in 2004. He was defeated by Progressive Conservative candidate Heather Klimchuck who benefited from the collapse of the NDP vote to surge past Miller. After being elected Klimchuck was appointed to cabinet by Premier Ed Stelmach in 2008.

Legislature resultsEdit

1971 general electionEdit

1971 Alberta general election results[2] Turnout 80.05% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
Progressive Conservative Lou Hyndman 7,661 59.70%
Social Credit Lou Letourneau 4,001 31.18%
New Democratic Mary Lou Pocklington 848 6.61%
  Liberal Sol Estrin 322 2.51% *
Total 12,832
Rejected, spoiled and declined 37
Eligible electors / Turnout 16,077  %

1975 general electionEdit

1975 Alberta general election results[3] Turnout 58.28% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
Progressive Conservative Lou Hyndman 7,735 74.39% 14.69%
New Democratic Alex McEachern 1,837 17.67% 11.06%
Social Credit Al Opstad 782 7.52% -23.66%
  Constitutional Socialist William Askin 44 0.42% *
Total 10,398
Rejected, spoiled and declined 35
Eligible electors / Turnout 17,902  %
Progressive Conservative hold Swing 12.86%

1979 general electionEdit

1979 Alberta general election results[4] Turnout 59.29% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
Progressive Conservative Lou Hyndman 6,597 61.47% -12.92%
New Democratic Doug Trace 1,838 17.13% -0.54%
Social Credit Patrice Taylor 1,330 12.39% 4.87%
  Liberal David Panar 967 9.01% *
Total 10,732
Rejected, spoiled and declined 43
Eligible electors / Turnout 18,175  %
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -6.73%

1982 general electionEdit

1982 Alberta general election results[5] Turnout 69.62% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
Progressive Conservative Lou Hyndman 7,724 61.98% 0.51%
New Democratic Tony Smith 2,555 20.50% 3.37%
Western Canada Concept Fred Marshall 1,649 13.23% *
Liberal Jerry Paschen 534 4.29% -4.72%
Total 12,462
Rejected, spoiled and declined 20
Eligible electors / Turnout 17,928  %
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -6.73%

1986 general electionEdit

1986 Alberta general election results[6] Turnout 53.06% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
Progressive Conservative Nancy MacBeth 5,193 52.41% -9.57%
New Democratic Jim Bell 2,918 29.45% 8.95%
Liberal Colin McDonald 1,352 13.65% 9.36%
Representative Douglase Ringrose 312 3.15%
Western Canada Concept Alice Moody 133 1.34% -11.89% *
Total 9,908
Rejected, spoiled and declined 16
Eligible electors / Turnout 18,705  %
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -9.26%

1989 general electionEdit

1989 Alberta general election results[7] Turnout 59.46% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
Progressive Conservative Nancy MacBeth 5,128 47.60% -4.81%
Liberal Hal Annett 2,935 27.25% 13.60%
New Democratic George Millar 2,709 25.15% -4.30%
Total 10,772
Rejected, spoiled and declined 24
Eligible electors / Turnout 18,157  %
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -9.21%

1993 general electionEdit

1993 Alberta general election results[8] Turnout 63.21% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
Liberal Howard Sapers 7,745 50.22% 22.95%
Progressive Conservative Gwen Harris 5,150 33.39% -14.21%
New Democratic Arlene Young 1,874 12.15% -13.00%
Social Credit Trevor Blinston 301 1.95%
Confederation of Regions Pat Nelson 231 1.50%

#E6E6FA

Natural Law Paula Johnsen 122 0.79% *
Total 15,423
Rejected, spoiled and declined 24
Eligible electors / Turnout 24,456  %
  Liberal pickup from Progressive Conservative Swing 18.58%

1997 general electionEdit

1997 Alberta general election results[9] Turnout 56.99% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
  Liberal Howard Sapers 5,785 48.01% -2.21%
Progressive Conservative Kim MacKenzie 4,368 36.25% 2.86%
New Democratic Arlene Young 1,198 9.94% -2.21%
Social Credit Jon Dykstra 630 5.23% 3.28%

#E6E6FA

Natural Law Sam Thomas 69 0.57% -0.22% *
Total 12,050
Rejected, spoiled and declined 23
Eligible electors / Turnout 21,183  %
  Liberal hold Swing -2.54%

2001 general electionEdit

2001 Alberta general election results[10] Turnout 56.79% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
Progressive Conservative Drew Hutton 5,515 45.67% 9.42%
  Liberal Howard Sapers 5,328 44.12% -3.89%
New Democratic Guy Desrosiers 1,232 10.21% 0.27%
Total 12,075
Rejected, spoiled and declined 46
Eligible electors / Turnout 21,343  %
Progressive Conservative gain from Liberal Swing 6.66%

2004 general electionEdit

2004 Alberta general election results[11] Turnout 56.72% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
Liberal Bruce Miller 4,604 35.13% -8.99%
New Democratic Larry Booi 4,052 30.92% 20.71%
Progressive Conservative Drew Hutton 3,759 28.68% -16.99%
Alberta Alliance Blaine Currie 307 2.34%
Green Peter Johnston 271 2.07% *
Social Credit Walter Schachenhofer 113 0.86%
Total 13,106 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 122
23,320 Eligible Electors
  Liberal pickup from Progressive Conservative Swing -14.85%

2008 general electionEdit

2008 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Heather Klimchuk 4,604 39.90% 11.22%
Liberal Bruce Miller 4,508 39.07% 3.94%
New Democratic Arlene Chapman 1,743 15.11% −15.81%
Green Peter Johnston 408 3.54% 1.47%
Wildrose Alliance Elden Van Hauwaert 275 2.38% 0.04%
Total 11,538
Rejected, spoiled and declined 58
Eligible electors / Turnout 29,821 38.89%
Progressive Conservative gain from Liberal Swing 7.58%
Source: The Report on the March 3, 2008 Provincial General Election of the Twenty-seventh Legislative Assembly. Elections Alberta. July 28, 2008. pp. 294–297.

2012 general electionEdit

2012 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Heather Klimchuk 6,176 38.20 –1.7
New Democratic Ray Martin 4,141 25.61 +10.5
Wildrose Don Koziak 2,732 16.90 +13.36
Liberal Bruce Miller 1,668 10.32 –28.75
Alberta Party Sue Huff 1,451 8.97 -
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -1.7

2015 general electionEdit

2015 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
New Democratic Sarah Hoffman 12,403 68.5 +42.89
Progressive Conservative Heather Klimchuk 3,137 17.3 -20.9
Wildrose Don Koziak 1,381 7.6 -9.3
Liberal Karen Sevcik 542 3.0 -7.3
Alberta Party Chris Vilcsak 445 2.5 -6.47
Green David Parker 199 1.1 -
New Democratic gain from Progressive Conservative Swing +42.89%

2019 general electionEdit

2019 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
New Democratic Sarah Hoffman 11,573 58.7% -9.8%
United Conservative Marjorie Newman 5,871 29.8% +4.9%
Alberta Party Glen Tickner 1,985 10.1% +7.6
  Independence Clint Kelly 298 1.5% --
Total 19,727
Rejected, spoiled and declined 134
Registered electors 33,948
Turnout 58.4%
New Democratic hold Swing -9.8%

[12]

Senate nominee resultsEdit

2004 Senate nominee election district resultsEdit

2004 Senate nominee election results: Edmonton-Glenora[13] Turnout 57.78%
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
Progressive Conservative Betty Unger 4,770 17.13% 50.29% 2
  Independent Link Byfield 4,010 14.40% 42.28% 4
Progressive Conservative Bert Brown 3,035 10.90% 32.00% 1
  Independent Tom Sindlinger 2,875 10.32% 30.31% 9
Progressive Conservative Cliff Breitkreuz 2,713 9.74% 28.60% 3
Alberta Alliance Michael Roth 2,447 8.79% 25.80% 7
Alberta Alliance Gary Horan 2,110 7.58% 22.25% 10
Alberta Alliance Vance Gough 2,080 7.47% 21.93% 8
Progressive Conservative David Usherwood 1,979 7.11% 20.87% 6
Progressive Conservative Jim Silye 1,831 6.56% 19.30% 5
Total Votes 27,850 100%
Total Ballots 9,485 2.94 Votes Per Ballot
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 3,989

Voters had the option of selecting 4 Candidates on the Ballot

2012 Senate nominee election district resultsEdit

Student Vote resultsEdit

2004 student electionEdit

Participating Schools[14]
Archbishop Macdonald School
Westminster School

On November 19, 2004 a Student Vote was conducted at participating Alberta schools to parallel the 2004 Alberta general election results. The vote was designed to educate students and simulate the electoral process for persons who have not yet reached the legal majority. The vote was conducted in 80 of the 83 provincial electoral districts with students voting for actual election candidates. Schools with a large student body that reside in another electoral district had the option to vote for candidates outside of the electoral district then where they were physically located.

2004 Alberta Student Vote results[15]
Affiliation Candidate Votes %
  NDP Larry Booi 316 30.98%
  Liberal Bruce Miller 266 26.08%
Progressive Conservative Drew Hutton 250 24.51%
Green Peter Johnston 137 13.43%
Alberta Alliance Blaine Currie 30 2.94%
  Social Credit Walter Schachenhofer 21 2.06%
Total 1,020 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 12

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "E‑4.1". Statutes of the Province of Alberta. Government of Alberta. 2003. pp. 17–18.
  2. ^ "Edmonton-Glenora Official Results 1971 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved March 1, 2010.
  3. ^ "Edmonton-Glenora Official Results 1975 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved March 1, 2010.
  4. ^ "Edmonton-Glenora Official Results 1979 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved March 1, 2010.
  5. ^ "Edmonton-Glenora Official Results 1982 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved March 1, 2010.
  6. ^ "Edmonton-Glenora Official Results 1986 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved March 1, 2010.
  7. ^ "Edmonton-Glenora Official Results 1989 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved March 1, 2010.
  8. ^ "Edmonton-Glenora Official Results 1993 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved March 1, 2010.
  9. ^ "1997 General Election". Elections Alberta. Archived from the original on February 14, 2012. Retrieved January 26, 2012.
  10. ^ "Edmonton-Glenora Statement of Official Results 2001 Alberta general election" (PDF). Elections Alberta. Retrieved March 27, 2010.
  11. ^ "Edmonton-Glenora Statement of Official Results 2004 Alberta general election" (PDF). Elections Alberta. Retrieved February 2, 2012.
  12. ^ http://officialresults.elections.ab.ca/orResultsED.cfm?ED=32&EventId=60 Elections Alberta. 2019 Official Results Retrieved May 2, 2019
  13. ^ "Senate Nominee Election 2004 Tabulation of Official Results" (PDF). Elections Alberta. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 4, 2009. Retrieved February 28, 2010.
  14. ^ "School by School results". Student Vote Canada. Archived from the original on October 5, 2007. Retrieved 2008-04-18.
  15. ^ "Riding by Riding Results - the Candidates". Student Vote Canada. Archived from the original on October 6, 2007. Retrieved 2008-04-19.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 53°34′N 113°34′W / 53.56°N 113.56°W / 53.56; -113.56