Edberg, Alberta

Edberg is a village in central Alberta, Canada. It is approximately 31 km (19 mi) south of Camrose.

Edberg
Village of Edberg
Edberg, Alberta is located in Alberta
Edberg, Alberta
Location in Alberta
Coordinates: 52°47′03″N 112°47′09″W / 52.78429°N 112.78582°W / 52.78429; -112.78582Coordinates: 52°47′03″N 112°47′09″W / 52.78429°N 112.78582°W / 52.78429; -112.78582
CountryCanada
ProvinceAlberta
RegionCentral Alberta
Census division10
Municipal districtCamrose County
Incorporated[1] 
 • VillageFebruary 4, 1930
Government
 • MayorIan Daykin
 • Governing bodyEdberg Village Council
 • Deputy MayorJacquie Boulet
 • CouncilorDavid Butt
Area
 (2021)[3]
 • Land0.35 km2 (0.14 sq mi)
Elevation
758 m (2,487 ft)
Population
 (2021)[3]
 • Total126
 • Density356.1/km2 (922/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC−7 (MST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−6 (MDT)
HighwaysHighway 56
WaterwayDriedmeat Lake
WebsiteOfficial website

Johan Edstrom, an early postmaster, named the village after himself.[4]

DemographicsEdit

In the 2021 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, the Village of Edberg had a population of 126 living in 58 of its 67 total private dwellings, a change of -16.6% from its 2016 population of 151. With a land area of 0.35 km2 (0.14 sq mi), it had a population density of 360.0/km2 (932.4/sq mi) in 2021.[3]

In the 2016 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, the Village of Edberg recorded a population of 151 living in 61 of its 65 total private dwellings, a -10.1% change from its 2011 population of 168. With a land area of 0.35 km2 (0.14 sq mi), it had a population density of 431.4/km2 (1,117.4/sq mi) in 2016.[5]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Location and History Profile: Village of Edberg" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. October 21, 2016. p. 260. Retrieved October 23, 2016.
  2. ^ "Municipal Officials Search". Alberta Municipal Affairs. May 9, 2019. Retrieved October 1, 2021.
  3. ^ a b c "Population and dwelling counts: Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities)". Statistics Canada. February 9, 2022. Retrieved February 9, 2022.
  4. ^ Place-names of Alberta. Ottawa: Geographic Board of Canada. 1928. p. 46.
  5. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2017. Retrieved February 8, 2017.

External linksEdit