Duane Thompson

Duane Thompson (born Lura Duane Malony,[1] July 28, 1903 – August 15, 1970) was an American film actress during Hollywood's silent film era. When Talkies pushed silent films into the background, she worked in stock theater for a time before moving to radio drama. She was married twice, to comedian Buddy Wattles and to radio producer William T. Johnson.

Duane Thompson
Duane Thompson Hartsook.jpg
Born
Duane Malony

(1903-07-28)July 28, 1903
DiedAugust 15, 1970(1970-08-15) (aged 67)
Other namesViolet Joy
OccupationActress
Years active1921–1940
Spouse(s)Buddy Wattles (m.1928, divorced)
William T. Johnson (m.1937)
Children1

Dancer and bit playerEdit

Thompson and her mother moved to San Francisco and Hollywood in the early 1920s, where Thompson, after a stint as a cafe dancer, pursued a career in acting. She received her first film role in 1921, starring opposite Vernon Dent as Violet Joy in Up and at 'em.

Silent film starEdit

Dropping Violet Joy for Duane Thompson,[2] she was Neal Burn's[3] leading lady in Hot Water.[citation needed] That film launched her into regular roles, and she starred in four films that year. From 1923 to 1929, Thompson starred in 37 films, with uncredited roles in another three films. In 1925, she was one of 13 women selected by the Western Association of Motion Picture Advertisers (WAMPAS) as a WAMPAS Baby Star[4] It was said at the time she was selected by WAMPAS that "Duane Thompson, with dancing as a foundation for a theatrical career, embarked on what is leading her to fame and fortune... She has appeared in numerous Christie Comedies,[5] and is now leading lady for Walter Hiers."[6]

Stage and radioEdit

Although Thompson appeared in Voice of the City,[7] a Talkie, the advent of talking films effectively ended her film career, and she went on to stock theater. In 1928, she was signed for a stage role in Dixie McCoy's production of Tarnish at the Hollywood Music Box.,[5] and in 1931, she played Susan Porter in Philip Barry's Holiday with the Woodward Players in St. Louis.[8] Shortly thereafter, she turned to radio, where she opened each broadcast of the Hollywood Hotel radio program[9] and played a lead in such comedy series as The Newlyweds.[10]

Her radio role opening broadcasts of Hollywood Hotel led to an offer in 1937 to play herself in the Hollywood Hotel movie.[11] Following that film she returned to her work in radio with her second husband, producer William T. Johnson.[12][13] She was often cast as a switchboard operator.[14]

Personal lifeEdit

Born July 28, 1903 in Red Oak, Iowa, Lura Duane Malony was the daughter of Dr. John Henry Malony and Georgia Ethel Manker. She and her mother relocated to Omaha when Duane was 2 years old, before moving on to California.[1] Duane took the surname of her mother's second husband, Tommy Thompson. For a brief time she used the stage name Violet Joy. On December 11, 1928, she married stage comedian Emmett K. (Buddy) Wattles,[15] and, in 1937, radio producer William T. Johnson.[16][17] After retiring, she lived in Los Angeles with her husband and daughter, Judith, until her death on August 15, 1970, at the age of 67.

Partial filmographyEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Iowa Girl Is Elected Star". The Des Moines Register. Iowa, Des Moines. March 8, 1925. p. 2 - L. Retrieved September 6, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  
  2. ^ "Movie Facts and Fancies". Boston Globe. Massachusetts, Boston. May 20, 1923. p. 31. Retrieved September 12, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  
  3. ^ "Four New Films for Entire Week: ...Another New Lead". Los Angeles Times. California, Los Angeles. January 21, 1923. p. 67. Retrieved September 8, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  
  4. ^ "Duane Thompson From Dancer in Cafe to Parts in Movies". Dayton Herald. Ohio, Dayton. February 6, 1925. p. 22. Retrieved September 8, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  
  5. ^ a b Kingsley, Grace (September 13, 1928). "Lasky Film to Be All-Talkie: ...Duane Thomson on Stage at Music Box". Los Angeles Times. California, Los Angeles. p. 26. Retrieved September 10, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  
  6. ^ "Here Are the Lucky Thirteen Selected by WAMPAS". Los Angeles Times. California, Los Angeles. January 4, 1925. p. 27. Retrieved September 8, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  
  7. ^ "Innocent Man Saved from Pen". Los Angeles Times. California, Los Angeles. April 27, 1929. p. 25. Retrieved September 13, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  
  8. ^ "Woodward Players" seen in 'Holiday'". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Missouri, St. Louis. September 21, 1931. p. 19. Retrieved September 10, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  
  9. ^ "Hollywood Hotel Begins Third Year". Harrisburg Telegraph. Pennsylvania, Harrisburg. October 9, 1936. p. 14. Retrieved September 10, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  
  10. ^ Nye, Carroll (February 19, 1936). "Newlyweds Replace In-Laws". Los Angeles Times. California, Los Angeles. p. 11. Retrieved September 10, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  
  11. ^ "'Hollywood Hotel' Stage Revue". Boston Globe. Massachusetts, Boston. January 21, 1938. p. 22. Retrieved September 10, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  
  12. ^ Donnell, Darrell (July 4, 1937). "Couple Find Happiness as Co-Workers". San Francisco Examiner. California, San Francisco. p. 28. Retrieved September 10, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  
  13. ^ Donnell, Darrell (October 17, 1937). "Serial Begun on Hollywood". San Francisco Examiner. California, San Francisco. p. 20. Retrieved September 10, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  
  14. ^ Bentley, Bob (August 27, 1943). "Radio Notes". Cincinnati Enquirer. Ohio, Cincinnati. p. 18. Retrieved September 10, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  
  15. ^ "Busy Duane Thompson Weds Buddy Wattles". Indianapolis Star. Indiana, Indianapolis. Universal Service. December 10, 1928. p. 1. Retrieved September 10, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  
  16. ^ Winchell, Walter (February 18, 1937). "Man About Town". Minneapolis Star Tribune. Minnesota, Minneapolis. p. 11. Retrieved September 10, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  
  17. ^ Nye, Carroll (March 1, 1937). "Gus Edwards to Start New Program Today: ...Are You Listening?". Los Angeles Times. California, Los Angeles. p. 14. Retrieved September 10, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  

External linksEdit