Druze in Jordan

Druze in Jordan refers to adherents of the Druze faith, an ethnoreligious[2] esoteric group originating from the Near East who self identify as unitarians (Muwahhideen).[3] Druze faith is a monotheistic and Abrahamic religion, and Druze do not identify as Muslims.[4][5][6]

Jordanian Druze people
Total population
32,000[1]
Languages
Vernacular:
Jordanian Arabic
Religion
Druze faith

The Jordanian Druze people are believed to constitute about 0.5% of the total population of Jordan, which is around 32,000.[7] The Druze, who refer to themselves as al-Muwahhideen, or "believers in one God," are concentrated in the rural, mountainous areas west and north of Amman.

HistoryEdit

The Druze faith is a monotheistic Abrahamic religion that does not follow the Five Pillars of Islam, "fasting during the month of Ramadan and making a pilgrimage to Mecca. Thus, they are not regarded by Muslims as Islamic".[8][9] The Druze beliefs incorporate elements of Ismailism, Gnosticism, Neoplatonism and other philosophies. The Druze call themselves Ahl al-Tawhid "People of Unitarianism or Monotheism" or al-Muwaḥḥidūn."

The Druze follow a life style of isolation where no conversion is allowed, neither out of, or into, the religion. When Druze live among people of other religions, they try to blend in, in order to protect their religion and their own safety. They can pray as Muslims, or as Christians, depending on where they are. This system is apparently changing in modern times, where more security has allowed Druze to be more open about their religious belonging."[10]

Some of Arabians from the Tanukh inaugurated the Druze community in Jordan when most of them accepted and adopted the new message that was being preached in the 11th century, due to their leaderships close ties with then Fatimid ruler Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah.[11]

DemographicsEdit

The Druze, who refer to themselves as al-Muwahhideen, or "believers in one God," are concentrated in the rural, mountainous areas north and west of Amman. The Jordanian Druze are estimated to constitute 0.5% of Jordan's population of approximately 6.5 million, which means they amount to 32,000.[12]

Notable peopleEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ International Religious Freedom Report, US State Department, 2005
  2. ^ Chatty, Dawn. Displacement and Dispossession in the Modern Middle East. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521817927.
  3. ^ Doniger, Wendy. Merriam-Webster's Encyclopedia of World Religions. Merriam-Webster, Inc. ISBN 0877790442.
  4. ^ "Are the Druze People Arabs or Muslims? Deciphering Who They Are". Arab America. Arab America. 8 August 2018. Retrieved 13 April 2020.
  5. ^ James Lewis (2002). The Encyclopedia of Cults, Sects, and New Religions. Prometheus Books. Retrieved 13 May 2015.
  6. ^ De McLaurin, Ronald (1979). The Political Role of Minority Groups in the Middle East. Michigan University Press. p. 114. ISBN 9780030525964. Theologically, one would have to conclude that the Druze are not Muslims. They do not accept the five pillars of Islam. In place of these principles the Druze have instituted the seven precepts noted above..
  7. ^ International Religious Freedom Report, US State Department, 2005
  8. ^ "Druze". druze.org.au. 2015. Archived from the original on 2016-02-14.
  9. ^ James Lewis (2002). The Encyclopedia of Cults, Sects, and New Religions. Prometheus Books. Retrieved 13 May 2015.
  10. ^ "Druze". druze.org.au. 2015. Archived from the original on 2016-02-14.
  11. ^ William Harris (19 Jul 2012). Lebanon: A History, 600-2011 (illustrated ed.). Oxford University Press. p. 46. ISBN 9780195181111.
  12. ^ International Religious Freedom Report, US State Department, 2005