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HistoryEdit

The Dragon Awards were first presented in 2016,[1][2] created on the occasion of the 30th anniversary of Dragon Con to "recognize excellence in all things Science Fiction and Fantasy."[3][4] In 2018, 11,000 voters cast a ballot.[5] They are given out annually at Dragon Con in Atlanta, Georgia.

The finalist shortlist for the first Dragon Awards was announced on August 11, 2016,[6] and the winners were announced on September 4 that year.[7]

A unique feature of the Awards is that it runs a diverse set of subgenera.[8]

In 2017, nominated authors Allison Littlewood, John Scalzi, and N.K. Jemisin asked Dragon Con to remove their names from the ballot. John Scalzi then reconsidered and kept his name on the ballot. The coordinators of the Dragon Awards initially refused to remove authors names, then changed their minds after receiving criticism across blogs and science fiction related publications.[9][10][11]

Nomination and voting processesEdit

The nominations and votes are collected electronically. Participation is available to everyone, requiring only an e-mail address, but no membership or other fees, to vote.[12] The Dragon Awards website states that they "[reserve] the right to invalidate suspect or questionable ballots without notice,"[13] and that "All decisions regarding the voting process and selection of winners shall be made by DRAGON CON in its sole discretion, shall be final, and shall not be subject to challenge or appeal."[14] Language describing the review of nominations does not state that nominations are counted numerically but are "gathered and reviewed to create a final ballot."[15] Neither counts of nominations nor votes have ever been made public.

The award process consists of two steps:

  • a nomination step where each voter nominates one work of choice in each category. The nominations are "gathered and reviewed[by whom?] to create a final ballot."[15]
  • a voting step where the finalists selected from the nominated works are voted on by each voter.

ReceptionEdit

The Dragon Awards have been criticized because of the appearance that the awards were created in conjunction with campaigns by the Rabid and Sad Puppies to attack the Hugo Award.[12] Another concern raised is regarding the opaqueness of the nomination and voting process.[11]

WinnersEdit

The full list of nominees ("shortlist") can be found at List of Dragon Award nominees.

Best Science Fiction NovelEdit

Year Work Author(s) Publisher(s) Ref.
2016 Somewhither: Being the First Part of A Tale of the Unwithering Realm John C. Wright Castalia House [16]
2017 Babylon's Ashes James S. A. Corey Orbit Books [17]
2018 Artemis Andy Weir Crown Publishing Group [18][19]

Best Fantasy NovelEdit

Year Work Author(s) Publisher(s) Ref.
2016 Son of the Black Sword Larry Correia Baen Books [16]
2017 Monster Hunter Memoirs: Grunge Larry Correia, John Ringo Baen Books [17]
2018 Oathbringer Brandon Sanderson Tor Books [18]

Best Young Adult / Middle Grade NovelEdit

Year Work Author(s) Publisher(s) Ref.
2016 The Shepherd's Crown Terry Pratchett Doubleday [16]
2017 The Hammer of Thor Rick Riordan Disney-Hyperion Books [17]
2018 Children of Blood and Bone Tomi Adeyemi Henry Holt [18][20]

Best Military Science Fiction or Fantasy NovelEdit

Year Work Author(s) Publisher(s) Ref.
2016 Hell's Foundations Quiver David Weber Tor Books [16]
2017 Iron Dragoons Richard Fox Triplane Press [17]
2018 A Call to Vengeance Timothy Zahn, David Weber and Thomas Pope Baen Books [18]

Best Alternate History NovelEdit

Year Work Author(s) Publisher(s) Ref.
2016 League of Dragons Naomi Novik Del Rey Books [16]
2017 Fallout Harry Turtledove Del Rey Books [17]
2018 Uncharted Kevin J. Anderson and Sarah A. Hoyt Baen Books [18]

Best Apocalyptic NovelEdit

The category "Best Apocalyptic Novel" was removed from the awards in 2018.

Year Work Author(s) Publisher(s) Ref.
2016 Ctrl Alt Revolt! Nick Cole self-published [16]
2017 Walkaway Cory Doctorow Tor Books [17][21]

Best Media Tie-In NovelEdit

The category "Best Media Tie-In Novel" was first introduced in 2018.

Year Work Author(s) Publisher(s) Ref.
2018 Leia: Princess of Alderaan Claudia Gray Disney-Lucasfilm [18]

Best Horror NovelEdit

Year Work Author(s) Publisher(s) Ref.
2016 Souldancer Brian Niemeier self-published [16]
2017 The Changeling Victor LaValle Spiegel & Grau [17]
2018 Sleeping Beauties Stephen King and Owen King Scribner [18]

Best Comic BookEdit

Year Work Author(s)/
Artist(s)
Publisher(s) Ref.
2016 Ms. Marvel Sana Amanat, Stephen Wacker, G. Willow Wilson, Adrian Alphona Marvel Comics [22]
2017 The Dresden Files: Dog Men Jim Butcher, Mark Powers Dynamite Entertainment [23][24]
2018 Mighty Thor Jason Aaron and Russell Dauterman Marvel Comics [18][25]

Best Graphic NovelEdit

Year Work Author(s)/
Artist(s)
Publisher(s) Ref.
2016 The Sandman: Overture Neil Gaiman, J. H. Williams III Vertigo Comics [16]
2017 The Dresden Files: Wild Card Jim Butcher, Carlos Gomez Dynamite Entertainment [17]
2018 White Sand, Volume 1 Brandon Sanderson, Rik Hoskin and Julius M. Gopez Dynamite Entertainment [18][26]

Best Science Fiction or Fantasy TV SeriesEdit

Year Work Creator(s) Released on Ref.
2016 Game of Thrones David Benioff, D. B. Weiss HBO [22]
2017 Stranger Things The Duffer Brothers Netflix [23]
2018 Game of Thrones David Benioff, D. B. Weiss HBO [18]
2019 Good Omens Neil Gaiman Prime Video [27]

Best Science Fiction or Fantasy MovieEdit

Year Work Creator(s) Studio Ref.
2016 The Martian Ridley Scott (director), Drew Goddard (writer) Scott Free Productions, Kinberg Genre, TSG Entertainment [22]
2017 Wonder Woman Patty Jenkins (director), Allan Heinberg (writer), Zack Snyder (writer), Jason Fuchs (writer) RatPac-Dune Entertainment, DC Films, Tencent Pictures, Wanda Pictures, Atlas Entertainment, Cruel and Unusual Films [23]
2018 Black Panther Ryan Coogler (director, writer), Joe Robert Cole (writer) Marvel Studios [18]
2019 Avengers: Endgame Russo brothers (directors) Marvel Studios [28]

Best Science Fiction or Fantasy PC/Console GameEdit

Year Work Publisher(s) Ref.
2016 Fallout 4 Bethesda Softworks [29]
2017 The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild Nintendo [30]
2018 Middle-earth: Shadow of War Monolith Productions [18]

Best Science Fiction or Fantasy Mobile GameEdit

Year Work Developers(s) Ref.
2016 Fallout Shelter Bethesda Softworks [29]
2017 Pokémon Go Niantic [30]
2018 Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery Jam City [18]

Best Science Fiction or Fantasy Board GameEdit

Year Work Publisher(s) Ref.
2016 Pandemic: Legacy Z-Man Games [29]
2017 Betrayal at House on the Hill: Widow’s Walk Avalon Hill [30]
2018 Red Dragon Inn 6: Villains Slugfest Games [18]

Best Science Fiction or Fantasy Miniatures / Collectible Card / Role-Playing GameEdit

Year Work Publisher(s) Ref.
2016 Call of Cthulhu Roleplaying Game (7th edition) Chaosium Inc. [29]
2017 Magic: The Gathering: Eldritch Moon Wizards of the Coast [30]
2018 Magic: The Gathering: Unstable Wizards of the Coast [18]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Liptak, Andrew (September 4, 2016). "The inaugural Dragon Awards highlight the populist side of science fiction and fantasy". The Verge. Archived from the original on March 12, 2019. Retrieved March 12, 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  2. ^ Beth Elderkin (13 August 2016). "DragonCon Releases (Mostly) Puppy-Free Nominations For First Dragon Awards". Gizmodo. Retrieved 12 March 2019. DragonCon, Atlanta’s annual science fiction and fantasy competition, released the nominee list (see below) for the first-ever Dragon Awards
  3. ^ "Dragon Con 2019 - Dragon Awards Nominations". The Dragon Awards. Archived from the original on March 12, 2019. Retrieved March 12, 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  4. ^ "Dragon Con Announces Creation of the Dragon Awards". Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. 25 April 2016. Retrieved 12 March 2019. In celebration of their 30th anniversary, they have announced the creation of the Dragon Awards.
  5. ^ "Dragon Con packs in guests from all over the world, celebs in 2018". WSB-TV. 5 September 2018. Retrieved 12 March 2019. he Dragon Awards are the only fan’s choice award in fandom, with more than 11,000 people casting a ballot this year.
  6. ^ "2016 Dragon Awards Shortlist". Locus. 12 August 2016. Retrieved 12 March 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  7. ^ "2016 Dragon Awards Winners". Locus. 6 September 2016. Retrieved March 12, 2019. Winners of the inaugural Dragon Awards were announced at Dragon Con, held September 2–5, 2016 in Atlanta GA.
  8. ^ Andrew Liptak (4 August 2017). "The 2017 Dragon Awards are a far-ranging sci-fi and fantasy reading list". The Verge. Retrieved 12 March 2019. A key feature of the Dragon Awards is that, instead of one broad novel category (for any book over 50,000 words), they break down nominees by subgenre, for a much wider-ranging and more specific field of recognition.
  9. ^ Hines, Jim C. (August 9, 2017). "Dragon Awards Refuse to Let Authors Withdraw". Jim C. Hines. Archived from the original on March 12, 2019. Retrieved March 12, 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  10. ^ Andrew Liptak (10 August 2017). "Two science-fiction authors say they're being used as proxies in a fandom culture war". The Verge. Retrieved 12 March 2019.
  11. ^ a b Jemisin, N. K. (August 10, 2017). "Withdrawing from the Dragon Awards". N. K. Jemisin. Archived from the original on March 12, 2019. Retrieved March 12, 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  12. ^ a b Liptak, Andrew (August 13, 2016). "The first ever Dragon Awards shortlist aims to be the next major award for science fiction fans". The Verge. Retrieved March 25, 2019. this award would be driven by fan participation: they would nominate their favorite works, and vote on the final shortlist. Unlike the Hugo Awards, which require a paid membership to vote, the Dragon Awards were a completely free process.
  13. ^ "Fan FAQ". Dragon Con. Archived from the original on March 12, 2019. Retrieved March 12, 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  14. ^ "Dragon Awards Official Rules". Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  15. ^ a b "The Process". The Dragon Awards. Dragon Con. Archived from the original on March 13, 2019. Retrieved 13 March 2019. Your nominations are gathered and reviewed to create a final ballot. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h "2016 Dragon Award". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Retrieved September 5, 2017.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h "2017 Dragon Award". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Retrieved September 6, 2017.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "2018 Recipients – The Dragon Award". Dragon Con. Retrieved September 19, 2018.
  19. ^ "2018 Dragon Awards Winners". Locus. 4 September 2018. Retrieved 12 March 2019. Best Science Fiction Novel WINNER: Artemis, Andy Weir (Crown)
  20. ^ "2018 DRAGON AWARDS ANNOUNCED". Krypton Radio. 3 September 2018. Retrieved 12 March 2019. Best Young Adult / Middle Grade Novel Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi
  21. ^ "More Dragon Awards News", Locus, August 11, 2017. Retrieved April 1, 2018.
  22. ^ a b c "2016 Dragon Awards Shortlist". Locus Online. August 12, 2016. Archived from the original on March 12, 2019. Retrieved September 6, 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  23. ^ a b c "2017 Dragon Awards Shortlist". Locus Online. August 4, 2017. Retrieved September 6, 2017. See revised list at More Dragon Awards News", Locus, August 11, 2017. Accessed April 1, 2018.
  24. ^ "2017 Recipients". Dragon Con. Archived from the original on September 6, 2017. Retrieved September 6, 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  25. ^ KYLE PINION (3 September 2018). "Dragon Con '18: THE MIGHTY THOR wins Best Comic at the Dragon Awards". Comics Beat. Retrieved 12 March 2019. The Mighty Thor beat out a nominee slate that included Saga, Star Wars: Darth Vader, Doomsday Clock, Mister Miracle, and Aliens: Dead Orbit.
  26. ^ DONNA DICKENS (7 September 2018). "The Best in Sci-Fi Books This Week (9/7/18)". Geek.com. celebrate the winners of the 2018 Dragon Awards. Among the science-fiction wins were Andy Weir’s Artemis for Best Science Fiction Novel and Brandon Sanderson’s White Sand Volume 1 for Best Graphic Novel.
  27. ^ "The Dragon Awards 2019 Recipients". DragonCon.org. Retrieved September 13, 2019.
  28. ^ "The Dragon Awards 2019 Recipients". DragonCon.org. Retrieved September 13, 2019.
  29. ^ a b c d Liptak, Andrew (August 13, 2016). "The first ever Dragon Awards shortlist aims to be the next major award for science fiction fans". The Verge. Archived from the original on September 6, 2017. Retrieved September 6, 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  30. ^ a b c d Liptak, Andrew (September 3, 2017). "Here are the winners of the 2017 Dragon Awards". The Verge. Archived from the original on September 6, 2017. Retrieved September 6, 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)