The Dr. Harty Cup is an annual inter-schools hurling competition organised by the Munster Council of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). It has been contested every year, except on three occasions, since 1918. As the pinnacle of inter-schools hurling competition in the province of Munster, the winning of a Harty Cup medal is sometimes viewed as more important than an All-Ireland medal for some players.[1][2][3][4][5]

Dr. Harty Cup
Current season or competition:
2023–24 Harty Cup
IrishCorn an Artaigh
CodeHurling
Founded1918; 106 years ago (1918)
RegionMunster (GAA)
TrophyDr. Harty Cup
No. of teams21
Title holders Nenagh CBS (1st title)
First winner Rockwell College
Most titles St Flannan's College (22 titles)
SponsorsTUS
Official websiteOfficial website

The final, usually held in February, serves as the culmination of a round-robin group stage and knockout series of games played between October and February. Eligible players must be under the age of 19.[6]

The Dr. Harty Cup is an integral part of the wider All-Ireland PPS Championship. The winners and runners-up of the Dr Harty Cup final, like their counterparts in the Connacht and Leinster Championships, advance to the All-Ireland quarter-finals or semi-finals.

21 teams currently participate in the Dr Harty Cup. The title has been won at least once by 20 different schools, 12 of which have won the title more than once. The all-time record-holders are St Flannan's College, who have won the competition 22 times.

Cashel Community School are the current champions, having beaten Thurles CBS in the 2023 final.[7]

History

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Archbishop John Harty donated the cup which would bear his name.

Since 1900 a number of attempts were made to organise Gaelic games in secondary schools in Munster, however, these proved unsuccessful. A motion put forward by E. D. Ryan at the Tipperary County Board convention in December 1916 called on secondary schools in the county to give Gaelic games a foremost place. He also suggested that a deputation visit the principals of various colleges to get an explanation from them as to why they "wholly supported the games of snobocracy". A Munster schools' and colleges' meeting on 2 June 1917 agreed to the establishment of a provincial hurling competition. The age limit for the competition was set at 19. J. M. Harty, Archbishop of Cashel and Emly, donated a cup for the competition. At a further meeting in September 1917 it was agreed to reduce the age limit to 18.[8]

The draw for the inaugural Harty Cup was made in January 1918, with Rockwell College becoming the first champions after a 5–05 to 3–01 defeat of Christian Brothers College in the final.[9][10] Rockwell College went on to claim five titles up to 1931 before later concentrating on rugby union, while fellow rugby school St Munchin's College also won a Harty Cup title in 1922. Limerick CBS dominated the competition during the 1920s and became the first team to win three titles in-a-row.

After winning Harty Cup titles in 1919 and 1929, the North Monastery from Cork went on to dominated the following period. They became the first team to win four Harty Cup titles in-a-row, which they did between 1934 and 1937. These teams featured such players as the Buckley brothers, Connie and Din Joe, Dave Creedon, future Taoiseach Jack Lynch, Dan Moylan and Paddy O'Donovan.[11][12] North Monastery secured a second four-in-a-row from 1940 to 1943, with Mick Kennefick, John Lyons and future GAA President Con Murphy all forming the backbone of those teams.[13][14] The North Mon's run of successes was ended by a Jimmy Smyth-captained St Flannan's College from Ennis, who won their own four-in-a-row from 1944 to 1947.[15]

 
St Flannan's College are the all-time record holders.

St Flannan's won another four Harty Cup titles in the 1950s, however, Thurles CBS cam a close second by claiming three titles.[16] St Colman's College, Abbey CBS and Mount Sion CBS, featuring Martin Óg Morrissey and Frankie Walsh, all won first-time titles during the same period.[17][18] The 1960s began with the North Monastery winning consecutive titles, before Rice College claimed their only title after a defeat of St Flannan's College in an all-Ennis final in 1962.[19] They were beaten by first-time champions St Finbarr's College a year later, however, Limerick CBS with Éamonn Cregan and Éamonn Grimes became the third team to win four consecutive Harty Cup titles.[20][21] Limerick's attempt at winning a record fifth successive Harty Cup ended with a defeat by first-time champions Coláiste Chríost Rí in 1968.[22] This win ushered in eight successive victories for Cork schools, with a Christy Ring-trained St Finbarr's College leading the way by winning five Harty Cup titles in six seasons between 1969 and 1974.[23] The competition was played with 13 players-a-side during this period, however, this experiment was later abandoned.[24]

The North Monastery began the 1980s with back-to-back Harty Cup titles, with a team that featured Teddy McCarthy, Tomás Mulcahy and Tony O'Sullivan.[25] They won four titles in all during the decade, while St Flannan's College also won four titles.[26] Midelton CBS became first-time champions in 1988.[27] St Flannan's College continued to dominate the competition by winning four Harty Cup titles during the 1990s. Limerick CBS the North Monastery and a Donal Óg Cusack-captained Midleton CBS also claimed Harty Cup victories.[28]

 
St Colman's College.

The turn of the century saw St Flannan's College and St Colman's College dominate the Harty Cup. They each won five titles between 1996 and 2005.[29] Their hegemony was brought to an end by Midleton CBS in 2006, a victory which began a period of decline for the Cork-based schools and some of the other traditional powers.[30][31] De La Salle College became the first Waterford-based team to win the Harty Cup in over 50 years when they claimed back-to-back titles in 2007 and 2008.[32] Thurles CBS followed this up by bridging a 53-year gap when they claimed the Harty Cup in 2009.[33] The following decade belonged to Limerick-based Ardscoil Rís, who won five Harty Cup titles between 2010 and 2018, with teams that featured Shane Dowling, Declan Hannon and Cian Lynch.[34] By that stage, vocational schools were permitted to field teams in the competition after the merging of the vocational schools' and colleges' championships in 2013. St Joseph's Secondary School (2022) and Cashel Community School (2023) became the most recent first-time champions.

Current format

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Participating teams

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The following teams participated in the 2023-24 championship:

Team Location Colours
Ardscoil Rís Limerick Black, red and yellow
Castletroy College Limerick Blue and navy
Cashel Community School Cashel Yellow and blue
CBS Secondary School, Carrick-on-Suir Carrick-on-Suir Black and red
Charleville CBS Charleville Red and green
Christian Brothers College Cork Black, red and yellow
Coláiste Choilm Ballincollig Blue and white
De La Salle College Waterford Maroon and yellow
Gaelcholáiste Mhuire AG Cork Blue and white
Hamilton High School Bandon Yellow and white
John the Baptist Community School Hospital Red and black
Midleton CBS Midleton Red and white
Nenagh CBS Nenagh Black and blue
Our Lady's Secondary School Templemore Maroon and white
Pobalscoil na Tríonóide Youghal Blue and red
Rice College Ennis Yellow and blue
Scoil na Tríonóide Naofa Doon Blue and navy
St Colman's College Fermoy Green and white
St Flannan's College Ennis Blue and white
St Joseph's Secondary School Tulla Blue and white
Thurles CBS Thurles Blue and yellow

Championship

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The championship begins with a group stage of 21 teams, divided into six groups. Three groups contain four teams and three groups contain three teams. Each team meets the others in the group once in a round-robin format. The first-placed and second-placed teams from each group progress to the knockout stage. For this stage, the winning team from one group plays against the runners-up from another group.

Qualification for the All-Ireland Championship

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As of 2005, the winners and runners up of the Dr Harty Cup qualify for the All-Ireland Colleges Championship.[35] The runners-up qualify for the quarter-finals, while on some occasions the champions receive a bye to the semi-final stage, however, this is done in rotation with the Connacht and Leinster champions.

Trophy and medals

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The winning team is presented with the Dr Harty Cup, which is shaped like a traditional mether drinking vessel, similar in design to the Liam MacCarthy Cup. It was commissioned to honour John Harty (1867–1946), who was the Archbishop of Cashel and Emly for over 30 years until his death in 1946.[36][37]

Traditionally, the victory presentation takes place at a special rostrum in the main grandstand of the stadium. The winning captain accepts the cup on behalf of his team before giving a short speech. Individual members of the winning team then have an opportunity to come to the rostrum to lift the cup, which is held by the winning team until the following year's final. In accordance with GAA rules, a set of gold medals is awarded to the championship winners.

Roll of honours

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Performance by college

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Rank Team Won Runner-up Years won Years runner-up
1   St Flannan's College 22 18 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1952, 1954, 1957, 1958, 1976, 1979, 1982, 1983, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2004, 2005, 2020 1927, 1948, 1949, 1953, 1959, 1962, 1964, 1971, 1972, 1977, 1978, 1985, 1992, 1993, 2001, 2003, 2006, 2007,
2   North Monastery 19 10 1919, 1929, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1955, 1960, 1961, 1970, 1980, 1981, 1985, 1986, 1994 1933, 1939, 1945, 1946, 1956, 1957, 1979, 1982, 1983, 1991
3   Limerick CBS 10 12 1920, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1932, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1993 1923, 1924, 1940, 1941, 1955, 1958, 1968, 1970, 1974, 1975, 1984, 1998
4   St Colman's College 9 4 1948, 1949, 1977, 1992, 1996, 1997, 2001, 2002, 2003, 1920, 1947, 1980, 2017
5   Thurles CBS 8 11 1933, 1938, 1939, 1950, 1951, 1956, 2009, 2015 1932, 1943, 1954, 1960, 1961, 1966, 1988, 2005, 2008, 2010, 2023
6   St Finbarr's College 7 3 1963, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1984 1952, 1967, 1999
7   Rockwell College 5 6 1918, 1923, 1924, 1930, 1931 1922, 1925, 1926, 1929, 1934, 1935
  Ardscoil Rís 5 2 2010, 2011, 2014, 2016, 2018 2022, 2024
8   Midleton CBS 4 6 1988, 1995, 2006, 2019 1944, 1950, 1986, 1987, 1994, 2018
9   De La Salle College 2 2 2007, 2008 1965, 1976
  Coláiste na nDéise 2 1 2012, 2013 2004
  Our Lady's Secondary School 2 4 1978, 2017 2000, 2002, 2013, 2016
11   Nenagh CBS 1 4 2024 1990, 1996, 1997, 2012
  Mount Sion CBS 1 2 1953 1930, 1937
  Coláiste Chríost Rí 1 2 1968 1969, 1981
  Rice College 1 1 1962 1963
  Cashel Community School 1 1 2023 1973
  St Munchin's College 1 0 1922
  Abbey CBS 1 0 1959
  Coláiste Iognáid Rís 1 0 1975
  St Joseph's Secondary School, Tulla 1 0 2022
9  [citation needed] Christian Brothers College 0 3 1918. 2019, 2020
  CBS Charleville 0 2 - 1938, 2011
  M.S.J. Roscrea 0 1 - 1919
  Doon CBS 0 1 - 1931
  Coláiste na Mumhan 0 1 - 1936
Sullivan's Quay 0 1 - 1951
  Shannon Comprehensive School 0 1 - 1989
  Lismore CBS 0 1 - 1995
  St Caimin's Community School, Shannon 0 1 - 2009
  Scoil na Tríonóide Naofa, Doon 0 1 - 2014
  St Francis's College, Rochestown 0 1 - 2015

Performance by county

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County Winners Runners-Up Winning Colleges Runner-Up Colleges
  Cork 41 33 North Monastery (19), St Colman's College (9), St Finbarr's College (7), Midleton CBS (4), Coláiste Chriost Rí (1), Coláiste Iognáid Rís (1) North Monastery (10), Midleton CBS (6), St Colman's College (4), St Finbarr's College (3), Coláiste Chriost Rí (2), CBS Charleville (2), Christian Brothers College (3), Coláiste na Mumhan (1), Sullivan's Quay (1), St Francis's College (1)
  Clare 24 21 St Flannan's College (22), Rice College (1), St Joseph's Secondary School, Tulla (1) St Flannan's College (18), Rice College (1), Shannon Comprehensive (1), St Caimin's Community School (1)
  Tipperary 18 26 Thurles CBS (8), Rockwell College (5), Our Lady's Secondary School (2), Abbey CBS (1), Cashel CS (1), Nenagh CBS (1) Thurles CBS (11), Rockwell College (6), Our Lady's Secondary School (4), Nenagh CBS (4), M.S.J. Roscrea (1), Cashel CS (1)
  Limerick 16 16 Limerick CBS (10), Ardscoil Rís (5), St Munchin's College (1) Limerick CBS (12), Ardscoil Rís (2), Scoil na Tríonóide Naofa (1), , Doon CBS (1)
  Waterford 5 6 De La Salle College (2), Coláiste na nDéise (2), Mount Sion CBS (1) De La Salle College (2), Mount Sion CBS (2), Coláiste na nDéise (1), Lismore CBS (1)

List of finals

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Year Winners Score Runners-up Score
1918 Rockwell College 5-05 Christian Brothers College 3-01
1919 North Monastery 3-02 Mount St. Joseph Abbey 2-02
1920 Limerick CBS 7-00 St Colman's College 3-00
1921 No Competition
1922 St Munchin's College 4-01 Rockwell College 3-03
1923 Rockwell College 5-02 Limerick CBS 2-01
1924 Rockwell College 8-00 Limerick CBS 4-02
1925 Limerick CBS 4-00 Rockwell College 1-01
1926 Limerick CBS 3-03 Rockwell College 1-03
1927 Limerick CBS 11-07 St Flannan's College 1-00
1928 No Competition
1929 North Monastery 6-03 Rockwell College 5-00
1930 Rockwell College 8-02 Mount Sion CBS 1-01
1931 Rockwell College 6-02 Doon CBS 1-01
1932 Limerick CBS 4-01 Thurles CBS 2-02
1933 Thurles CBS 3-03 North Monastery 1-03
1934 North Monastery 4-02, 7-01 (R) Rockwell College 4-02, 3-03 (R)
1935 North Monastery 4-08 Rockwell College 3-02
1936 North Monastery 4-03 Coláiste na Mumhan, Mallow 2-06
1937 North Monastery 6-02 Mount Sion CBS 2-04
1938 Thurles CBS 7-07 Charleville CBS 3-02
1939 Thurles CBS 7-04 North Monastery 4-04
1940 North Monastery 6-03 Limerick CBS 4-02
1941 North Monastery 4-02 Limerick CBS 1-03
1942 North Monastery none
1943 North Monastery 3-07 Thurles CBS 3-01
1944 St Flannan's College 4-05 Midleton CBS 2-02
1945 St Flannan's College 2-06 North Monastery 3-02
1946 St Flannan's College 4-05 North Monastery 2-01
1947 St Flannan's College 4-05 St Colman's College 3-06
1948 St Colman's College 3-06, 6-04 (R) St Flannan's College 4-03, 4-06 (R)
1949 St Colman's College 4-06 St Flannan's College 1-03
1950 Thurles CBS 7-03 Midleton CBS 2-00
1951 Thurles CBS 3-05 Sullivan's Quay CBS 1-03
1952 St Flannan's College 1-05 St Finbarr's College 1-03
1953 Mount Sion CBS 3-02 St Flannan's College 1-07
1954 St Flannan's College 2-11 Thurles CBS 3-05
1955 North Monastery 4-07 Limerick CBS 2-02
1956 Thurles CBS 2-05 North Monastery 2-03
1957 St Flannan's College 7-07 North Monastery 3-03
1958 St Flannan's College Limerick CBS
1959 Abbey CBS 1-09 St Flannan's College 2-04
1960 North Monastery 0-10 Thurles CBS 1-04
1961 North Monastery 4-06 Thurles CBS 2-05
1962 Rice College 4-02 St Flannan's College 2-07
1963 St Finbarr's College 4-09 Rice College 4-03
1964 Limerick CBS 6-10 St Flannan's College 4-07
1965 Limerick CBS 4-06 De La Salle College Waterford 1-05
1966 Limerick CBS 6-05 Thurles CBS 5-03
1967 Limerick CBS 4-09 St Finbarr's College 1-05
1968 Coláiste Chríost Rí 5-09 Limerick CBS 5-04
1969 St Finbarr's College 6-11 Coláiste Chríost Rí 2-07
1970 North Monastery 6-05 Limerick CBS 4-07
1971 St Finbarr's College 4-12 St Flannan's College 2-04
1972 St Finbarr's College 6-11 St Flannan's College 2-07
1973 St Finbarr's College 5-14 Cashel CBS 2-05
1974 St Finbarr's College 10-11 Limerick CBS 2-02
1975 Colaiste Iognáid Ris 5-06 Limerick CBS 2-04
1976 St Flannan's College 2-09 De La Salle College Waterford 2-04
1977 St Colman's College 0-07 St Flannan's College 0-03
1978 Templemore CBS 3-05 St Flannan's College 2-05
1979 St Flannan's College 2-11 North Monastery 1-03
1980 North Monastery 3-06, 2-10 (R) St Colman's College 2-09, 2-05 (R)
1981 North Monastery 2-06 Coláiste Chríost Rí 1-07
1982 St Flannan's College 2-07 North Monastery 1-07
1983 St Flannan's College 0-09, 1-06 (R) North Monastery 0-09, 0-07 (R)
1984 St Finbarr's College 4-09 Limerick CBS 1-07
1985 North Monastery 5-06 St Flannan's College 1-07
1986 North Monastery 1-12 Midleton CBS 0-09
1987 St Flannan's College 3-12 Midleton CBS 2-06
1988 Midleton CBS 2-07 Thurles CBS 2-03
1989 St Flannan's College 0-09 Shannon Comprehensive School 0-05
1990 St Flannan's College 0-10 Nenagh CBS 0-03
1991 St Flannan's College 4-16 North Monastery 1-07
1992 St Colman's College 3-14 St Flannan's College 3-11
1993 Limerick CBS 5-05 St Flannan's College 1-12
1994 North Monastery 1-09 Midleton CBS 0-04
1995 Midleton CBS 3-18 Lismore CBS 3-05
1996 St Colman's College 3-19 Nenagh CBS 1-04
1997 St Colman's College 1-17 Nenagh CBS 0-08
1998 St Flannan's College 0-12 Limerick CBS 0-05 [38]
1999 St Flannan's College 1-14 St Finbarr's College 1-08 [39]
2000 St Flannan's College 3-14 Our Lady's Secondary School 3-08 [40]
2001 St Colman's College 2-12 St Flannan's College 0-15 [41]
2002 St Colman's College 2-18 Our Lady's Secondary School 0-06 [42]
2003 St Colman's College 1-06, 2-13 (R) St Flannan's College 1-06, 0-08 (R) [43]
2004 St Flannan's College 3-15 Coláistí na Déise 1-08 [44]
2005 St Flannan's College 1-11 Thurles CBS 1-06 [45]
2006 Midleton CBS 2-08 St Flannan's College 0-12 [46]
2007 De La Salle College Waterford 2-07 St Flannan's College 0-11 [47]
2008 De La Salle College Waterford 1-11 Thurles CBS 0-07 [48]
2009 Thurles CBS 3-15 St Caimin's Community School 0-10 [49]
2010 Ardscoil Rís 3-15 Thurles CBS 0-14 [50]
2011 Ardscoil Rís 3-19 Charleville CBS 0-03 [51]
2012 Colaiste na nDéise 2-14 Nenagh CBS 1-10 [52]
2013 Dungarvan Colleges 2-21 Our Lady's Secondary School 1-11 [53]
2014 Ardscoil Rís 2-13 Scoil na Troinoide, Doon 0-04 [54]
2015 Thurles CBS 2-12 St Francis College, Rochestown 1-12 [55]
2016 Ardscoil Rís 0-11 Our Lady's Secondary School 0-08 [56]
2017 Our Lady's Secondary School 2-22 St Colman's College 1-06 [57]
2018 Ardscoil Rís 3-18 Midleton CBS 2-10 [58]
2019 Midleton CBS 2-12 Christian Brothers College 0-14 [59]
2020 St Flannan's College 1-15 Christian Brothers College 1-12 [60]
2021 Cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic
2022 St Joseph's Secondary School 1-17 Ardscoil Rís 1-14 [61]
2023 Cashel Community School 0-12 Thurles CBS 0-11 [62]
2024 Nenagh CBS 2-16 Ardscoil Rís 0-21

Records and statistics

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Teams

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Final

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  • Most wins: 22:
    • St Flannan's College (1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1952, 1954, 1957, 1958, 1976, 1979, 1982, 1983, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2004, 2005, 2020)
  • Most consecutive wins: 4:
  • Most second-place finishes: 18:
    • St Flannan's College (1927, 1948, 1949, 1953, 1959, 1962, 1964, 1971, 1972, 1977, 1978, 1985, 1992, 1993, 2001, 2003, 2006, 2007)
  • Most appearances: 40:
    • St Flannan's College (1927, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1962, 1964, 1971, 1972, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2020)
  • Most appearances without winning: 4:

By decade

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The most successful college of each decade, judged by number of Dr Harty Cup titles, is as follows:

Gaps

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Longest gaps between successive championship titles:

See also

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References

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  1. ^ Daly, Anthony (27 July 2019). "Mind the gap - the dangerous leap from provincial champions to All-Ireland contenders". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 7 July 2023.
  2. ^ "Ryan recalls glory days for St Flannan's Harty hurling". The Clare Champion. 28 February 2020. Retrieved 7 July 2023.
  3. ^ Moynihan, Michael (18 February 2017). "Harty Cup final a nursery for the hurling heroes of tomorrow". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 7 July 2023.
  4. ^ Ó Muircheartaigh, Joe (4 February 2022). "Harty Cup final: 'Everyone in East Clare loves being associated with this'". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 7 July 2023.
  5. ^ Ryan, Pat (18 February 2017). "Harty final really is the blue ribbon day". The Corkman. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
  6. ^ "Dr. Harty Cup - Under 19 A Hurling". Munster GAA PPS website. Retrieved 17 February 2023.
  7. ^ O'Callaghan, Therese (6 February 2023). "Cashel CS crowned Harty Cup champions after historic first all-Tipperary decider". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
  8. ^ "Rockwell College and the Harty Cup". Séamus J. King website. Retrieved 27 July 2022.
  9. ^ "CBC Power into first Harty Cup final in 101 years". Irish Independent. 28 January 2019. Retrieved 27 July 2022.
  10. ^ "Harty Cup heroes: St Colman's and Thurles showcased the best of schools hurling". Echo Live. 12 January 2023. Retrieved 27 July 2022.
  11. ^ "Death of former Rebel captain Connie Buckley". Irish Examiner. 30 January 2009. Retrieved 8 July 2023.
  12. ^ "The Leeside Legends series: Jack Lynch was the ultimate leader at every level". The 42. 18 June 2020. Retrieved 8 July 2023.
  13. ^ Larkin, Brendan (30 April 2007). "Murphy: a truly great GAA statesman". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 8 July 2023.
  14. ^ Larkin, Brendan. "The best hurling team of the North Mon". dodonovan website. Retrieved 8 July 2023.
  15. ^ O'Sullivan, Jim (27 June 2011). "Friendship of greats worth more than medals to Smyth". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 8 July 2023.
  16. ^ Hurley, Denis (14 October 2015). "Thurles CBS begin title defence with St Colman's clash". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 8 July 2023.
  17. ^ Cahill, Liam (31 December 2011). "Mount Sion to the bone". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 8 July 2023.
  18. ^ "Abbey CBS Tipperary celebrate important milestone in unique history". Tipperary Live. 16 May 2019. Retrieved 8 July 2023.
  19. ^ O'Flynn, Diarmuid (11 February 2014). "Discipline, desire and dedication the Banner buzzwords". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 8 July 2023.
  20. ^ Moynihan, Michael (3 September 2016). "The mission accomplished to end Cork famine in 1966". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 8 July 2023.
  21. ^ Fogarty, John (19 August 2020). "Eamonn Cregan embarrassed by Limerick's 'pitiful' All-Ireland record". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 8 July 2023.
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  24. ^ Moynihan, Michael (6 March 2020). "Harty Cup hurling and a changing Ireland". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 8 July 2023.
  25. ^ Moynihan, Michael (25 April 2021). "The Mon versus Críost Rí — 'It was the biggest game a lot of us ever played in'". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 8 July 2023.
  26. ^ Daly, Anthony (27 July 2019). "Mind the gap - the dangerous leap from provincial champions to All-Ireland contenders". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 26 June 2023.
  27. ^ "A season to cherish for Midleton CBS and Paudie O'Brien". Echo Live. 20 April 2021. Retrieved 8 July 2023.
  28. ^ Crowe, Marie (21 November 2010). "Old order under threat in new colleges landscape". Irish Independent. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  29. ^ Cormican, Eoghan (11 January 2023). "Special allure of Harty Cup draws Andrew O'Shaughnessy back to Colman's". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 8 July 2023.
  30. ^ O'Grady, Donal (19 December 2012). "Since 2006-7, 18 Munster colleges 'A' level hurling trophies have been on offer: Cork are bottom of the list with one". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  31. ^ Moynihan, Michael (6 March 2020). "Harty Cup hurling and a changing Ireland". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 19 January 2023.
  32. ^ O'Toole, Fintan (25 February 2012). "Déise date with destiny". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  33. ^ Larkin, Brendan (12 March 2005). "Thurles ready for a Harty celebration". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
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  35. ^ Larkin, Brendan (9 April 2005). "St Kieran's will be very difficult to dethrone". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 26 June 2023.
  36. ^ "'Treasured trophy' comes to Cashel for the very first time, writes school principal". Tipperary Live. 9 February 2023. Retrieved 26 June 2023.
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  39. ^ "Flannan's too hot for Finbarr's". Irish Independent. 8 March 1999. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
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  41. ^ "Limerick wonderkid leads Fermoy to glory". Irish Independent. 26 March 2001. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
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  46. ^ "Flannan's shocked as Midleton take Harty Cup". Irish Independent. 13 March 2006. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
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  53. ^ "Harty Cup final: Back-to-back titles for Dungarvan". Hogan Stand. 3 March 2013. Retrieved 3 March 2023.
  54. ^ "Harty Cup final: Ardscoil Ris rout local rivals". Hogan Stand. 22 February 2014. Retrieved 24 February 2014.
  55. ^ "Harty Cup final: Thurles topple Rochestown". Hogan Stand. 21 February 2015. Retrieved 22 February 2015.
  56. ^ "Ardscoil Rís claim fourth Harty Cup in seven years". Irish Examiner. 20 February 2016. Retrieved 22 February 2016.
  57. ^ "Templemore turn on the power". Irish Examiner. 20 February 2017. Retrieved 21 February 2017.
  58. ^ "Ardscoil Rís extend Cork's wait for Harty Cup success". Irish Examiner. 17 February 2018. Retrieved 17 May 2018.
  59. ^ "Midleton CBS end 13-year wait for Dr Harty Cup glory with final win over CBC Cork". The 42. 16 February 2019. Retrieved 17 February 2022.
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  62. ^ O'Callaghan, Therese (6 February 2023). "Cashel CS crowned Harty Cup champions after historic first all-Tipperary decider". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
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