Doug Taylor (historian)

Doug Taylor (1938–2020) was a Canadian historian, professor, author and connoisseur of movie theatres.[1][2] In two books, and multiple online articles, Taylor wrote about Toronto's history of beautiful cinemas.[3] He published a history of selected neighbourhoods in 2010, a book on Toronto lost landmarks in 2018.

Doug Taylor
Born(1938-06-14)June 14, 1938
Toronto
DiedJuly 27, 2020(2020-07-27) (aged 82)
Toronto
NationalityCanada
Other namesJohn Douglas Taylor
OccupationHistorian, teacher, author

Toronto Life magazine and Inside Toronto both profiled Taylor when he published Toronto Theaters and the Golden Age of the Silver Screen.[1][3][4] The Toronto Sun's local historian, Mike Filey, used its publication as a jump-off for his own article on Toronto's cinema history.[5]

Taylor's parents immigrated to Canada from Newfoundland, when it was an independent country.[1] Two of Taylor's books are memoirs of his experience growing up in an immigrant family.

Liz Braun, the Toronto Sun long-term film reviewer endorsed Taylor's books on Toronto cinemas.[6]

PublicationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "These vintage photos reveal the glamour of Toronto's old-timey movie theatres". Toronto Life. June 22, 2016. Retrieved May 24, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "LOST TORONTO: Great buildings that are no more". 24 Hours (Toronto). July 6, 2016. Retrieved May 24, 2017. The 1960s were the greatest period of civic destruction," the retired York University professor tells 24 Hours. "It was a period of civic vandalism, great neglect and city council loved everything sparkly and new. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ a b Justin Skinner (August 10, 2014). "Doug Taylor pays tribute to the movie theatres of Toronto's past". Inside Toronto. Retrieved May 24, 2017. Downtown author Doug Taylor has captured many of those changes, looking at Toronto’s history as a movie hub, in his new book Toronto Theatres and the Golden Age of the Silver Screen. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ Bernie Fletcher (September 9, 2014). "The Golden Age of movie houses". Beach Metro News. Retrieved May 25, 2017. Taylor tells the stories of local movie houses from the early days of storefront nickelodeons to the TIFF Bell Lightbox of today. Each chapter in the book traces one era, highlighting the decades when film theatres were the centres of entertainment in a community. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ Mike Filey (July 26, 2014). "The golden age of Toronto movie theatres". Toronto Sun. Retrieved May 25, 2017. Just released by the History Press out of Charleston, South Carolina (what a great city!) and distributed by the good people at Dundurn here in Toronto (an even better city!!) is a new book by Toronto history buff Doug Taylor. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ Liz Braun (June 15, 2019). "BRAUN: See you at the movies!". Toronto Sun. Retrieved August 10, 2019. If you’re interested in Toronto’s old movie theatres, historian Doug Taylor has two good books on the subject: Toronto Theatres and The Golden Age of the Silver Screen, and Local Movie Theatres of Yesteryear, both available on amazon.ca. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)