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Donga is one of the twelve departments of Benin. The capital of Donga is Djougou. The department of Donga was created in 1999 when it was split off from Atakora Department. Donga is subdivided into five communes, each centered at one of the principal towns: Bassila, Copargo, Djougou Rural, Djougou Urban and Ouaké.

Donga
Agriculture near Djougou, the department capital
Agriculture near Djougou, the department capital
Map highlighting the Donga Department
Map highlighting the Donga Department
Coordinates: 9°42′N 1°40′E / 9.700°N 1.667°E / 9.700; 1.667Coordinates: 9°42′N 1°40′E / 9.700°N 1.667°E / 9.700; 1.667
Country Benin
CapitalDjougou
Area
 • Total11,126 km2 (4,296 sq mi)
Population
 (2013 census)
 • Total542,605
 • Density49/km2 (130/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+1 (WAT)

As of 2013, the total population of the department was 543,130, with 270,754 males and 272,376 females. The proportion of women was 50.10%. The total rural population was 57.90%, while the urban population was 42.10%. The total labour force in the department was 120,021, of which 24.20% were women. The proportion of households with no level of education was 72.50%.

Contents

GeographyEdit

 
Road in Copargo, Benin

Benin is located in West Africa, bordered by Togo, Niger, Burkina Faso and Nigeria. The northwest regions are mostly forested mountains, from which two tributaries of the Niger River, the Mékrou River and the Pendjari River, originate.[2] The northeast plains slope down to the valleys of the Niger River. The climate is mostly humid and tropical. The northern regions of Benin receive one season of rainfall from May to September, while the southern regions receive two spells of rain from March to July and September to November. The country receives an average annual rainfall of around 1,200 mm (47 in).[3]

DemographicsEdit

Religious census[4]
Religion Percent(%)
Muslim
77.9%
Methodist
1%
Vodoun
0.4%
Catholic
11.9%
Celestial
0.2%
Other Christian
1.8%
Other Traditional
1.8%
Other
0.5%
Other Protestant
1.1%

According to Benin's 2013 census, the total population of the department was 543,130, with 270,754 males and 272,376 females. The proportion of women was 50.10%. The total rural population was 57.90%, while the urban population was 42.10%. The proportion of women of childbearing age (15 to 49 years old) was 23.30%. The foreign population was 7,760, representing 1.40% of the total population in the department. The labour force participation rate among foreigners aged 15–64 years was 30.70%. The proportion of women among the foreign population constituted 50.50%. The number of households in the department was 66,433 and the average household size was 8.2. The intercensal growth rate of the population was 4.00%.[5]

Among women, the average age at first marriage was 20.5 and the average age at maternity was 28. The synthetic index of fertility of women was 4.6. The average number of families in a house was 1.8 and the average number of persons per room was 1.8. The total labour force in the department was 120,021, of which 24.20% were women. The proportion of households with no level of education was 72.50% and the proportion of households with children attending school was 51.40%. The crude birth rate was 34.6, the general rate of fertility was 148.70 and the gross reproduction rate was 2.30.[4]

Administrative divisionsEdit

 
Communes of Donga

The department of Donga was created in 1999 with an area of 10,691 square kilometres (4,128 sq mi), when it was split off from Atakora Department. Its capital is Djougou.[6] Donga is subdivided into five communes, each centered at one of the principal towns: Bassila, Copargo, Djougou Rural, Djougou Urban and Ouaké.[7]

Benin, formerly known as Dahomey, was a French colony till 1894. It gained independence in 1960 and was admitted to the United Nations. The period from 1960 to 1972 was marked by political instability and frequent changes of leadership.[8] Benin originally had six administrative regions (départements), which have now been bifurcated to make 12. Each of the deconcentrated administrative services (directions départementales) of the sectoral ministries takes care of two administrative regions. A law passed in 1999 transformed the sous-prefectures, the lowest level of territorial administration, into local governments.[7] Municipalities and communal councils have elected representatives who manage the administration of the regions. The latest elections of the municipal and communal councils were held in June 2015.[9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Benin". Geohive. Archived from the original on 2017-02-01. Retrieved 25 November 2016.
  2. ^ McColl, R. W. (2014). Encyclopedia of World Geography, Volume 1. Infobase Publishing. p. 92-93. ISBN 9780816072293.
  3. ^ Haggett, Peter, ed. (2002). Encyclopedia of World Geography, Volume 17. Marshall Cavendish. p. 2325. ISBN 9780761473060.
  4. ^ a b "Socio economic data of Benin, 2013". Institut National de la Statistique et de l’Analyse Economique (INSAE) du Benin. 2013. Retrieved 25 November 2016.
  5. ^ "Census of Benin, 2013". Institut National de la Statistique et de l’Analyse Economique (INSAE) du Benin. 2013. Retrieved 25 November 2016.
  6. ^ Houngnikpo, Mathurin C.; Decalo, Samuel (2013). Historical Dictionary of Benin. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 143–4. ISBN 9780810871717.
  7. ^ a b Republic of Benin, Public Administration and Country profile (PDF) (Report). Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA), United Nations. 2004. p. 8. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  8. ^ "Benin country profile". BBC. 5 August 2016. Retrieved 20 November 2016.
  9. ^ "Local elections in Benin, 2015". African Elections Database. Retrieved 25 November 2016.

External linksEdit