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Donald Arthur Berry (born 1940[1]) is an American statistician and a practitioner and proponent of Bayesian statistics in medical science. He was the chairman of the Department of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center from 1999-2010, where he played a role in the use of Bayesian methods to develop innovative, adaptive clinical trials. He is best known for the development of statistical theory relating to the design of clinical trials. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the Institute of Mathematical Sciences.[2] He founded Berry Consultants, a statistical consulting group, with Scott Berry in 2000.[3]

Don Berry
Born26 May 1940
Southbridge, Massachusetts
NationalityAmerican
Alma materYale University
Scientific career
FieldsMathematics Statistics
InstitutionsUniversity of Minnesota
Duke University
University of Texas
Doctoral advisorJoseph B. Kadane
Leonard J. Savage
Doctoral studentsLurdes Inoue

BiographyEdit

Berry was born in Southbridge, Massachusetts in 1940, and obtained a A.B. in Mathematics from Dartmouth University, before moving to Yale university where he received an M.A and Ph.D. in statistics.[4] Berry initially "flunked out" of his undergraduate education at Dartmouth and joined the army, being stationed in Panama, but at the request of his Dean he returned to Dartmouth to complete his undergraduate education in mathematics.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ https://arxiv.org/pdf/1203.5668.pdf
  2. ^ Donald A. Berry, Ph.D., Division of Quantitative Sciences, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas. Retrieved 11 May 2009.
  3. ^ About Us Archived August 9, 2009, at the Wayback Machine, Berry Consultants. Retrieved 11 May 2009.
  4. ^ "Celebrating 70: An Interview with Don Berry" (PDF). Statistical Science 27(1), pp. 144-159. Institute of Mathematical Statistics. 2012. Retrieved 25 January 2019.
  5. ^ "Celebrating 70: An Interview with Don Berry" (PDF). Statistical Science 27(1), pp. 144-159. Institute of Mathematical Statistics. 2012. Retrieved 25 January 2019.

External linksEdit