Division of Nepean

The Division of Nepean was an Australian Electoral Division in the state of New South Wales. It was located in the western suburbs of Sydney. It originally covered the suburbs of Granville, Lithgow and Penrith. After the redistribution of 27 February 1913 it also included the suburb of Homebush.

Nepean
Australian House of Representatives Division
Created1906
Abolished1922
NamesakeEvan Nepean

The Division was named for the Nepean River,[1] which itself was named after British politician Evan Nepean.[2] It was proclaimed at the redistribution of 13 July 1906, and was first contested at the 1906 Federal election.[3] It was abolished at the redistribution of 13 September 1922 and divided between six electorates: Macquarie, Martin, Parramatta, Reid, Robertson and Werriwa.[4]

MembersEdit

Image Member Party Term Notes
    Eric Bowden
(1871–1931)
Anti-Socialist 12 December 1906
26 May 1909
Lost seat. Later elected to Nepean in 1919
  Commonwealth Liberal 26 May 1909
13 April 1910
    George Cann
(1871–1948)
Labor 13 April 1910
31 May 1913
Lost seat. Later elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly seat of Canterbury in 1914
    Richard Orchard
(1871–1942)
Commonwealth Liberal 31 May 1913
17 February 1917
Served as minister under Hughes. Retired
  Nationalist 17 February 1917
3 November 1919
    Eric Bowden
(1871–1931)
Nationalist 13 December 1919
16 December 1922
Elected to the Division of Parramatta after Nepean was abolished in 1922

Election resultsEdit

1919 Australian federal election: Nepean
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Nationalist Eric Bowden 20,630 57.1 -3.4
Labor Con Wallace 15,524 42.9 +3.4
Total formal votes 36,154 97.8
Informal votes 814 2.2
Turnout 36,968 68.6
Nationalist hold Swing -3.4

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Electoral division names no longer in use". Australian Electoral Commission. Retrieved 15 October 2020.
  2. ^ "Nepean River". Geographical Names Register (GNR) of NSW. Geographical Names Board of New South Wales. Retrieved 24 February 2013.  
  3. ^ Carr, Adam. "1906 legislative election: House of Representatives, New South Wales". Psephos. Retrieved 15 October 2020.
  4. ^ "Redistribution: new divisions, NSW gains a seat". The Sydney Morning Herald. 29 July 1922. p. 11. Retrieved 15 October 2020 – via Trove.