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The Division of Jagajaga is an Australian Electoral Division in the state of Victoria. It is located in the north-eastern suburbs of Melbourne, and lies north of the Yarra River. It covers an area of approximately 104 square kilometres and comprises the suburbs of Bellfield, Briar Hill, Diamond Creek, Eaglemont, Greensborough, Heidelberg, Heidelberg Heights, Heidelberg West, Ivanhoe, Ivanhoe East, Lower Plenty, Montmorency, Plenty, Rosanna, St Helena, Viewbank, Yallambie, Watsonia and Watsonia North; and parts of Bundoora, Bundoora, Eltham, Eltham North, Hurstbridge, Macleod, Wattle Glen and Yarrambat.

Jagajaga
Australian House of Representatives Division
Division of Jagajaga 2019.png
Division of Jagajaga in Victoria, as of the 2019 federal election.
Created1984
MPKate Thwaites
PartyLabor
NamesakeThree Wurundjeri elders
Electors107,575 (2019)
Area104 km2 (40.2 sq mi)
DemographicOuter Metropolitan

The area is predominantly residential and light industrial, and includes the Australian Army's Simpson Barracks, the Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, the Mercy Hospital for Women and the Austin Hospital.

Most of the City of Banyule and parts of the Shire of Nillumbik local government areas are contained within the Division's boundaries. Four Victorian Parliamentary Districts (Legislative Assembly) are represented in the Division, namely Ivanhoe, Eltham, Bundoora and Yan Yean. The Legislative Council Regions of Northern Metropolitan and Eastern Metropolitan are also represented.

Contents

HistoryEdit

 
The Wurundjeri Aboriginal Australian men who supposedly made the Batman Treaty with John Batman. The division's namesake comes from three of these elders

The Division was proclaimed at the redistribution of 14 September 1984, and was first contested at the 1984 election. The division replaced the western half of the abolished Division of Diamond Valley, with the eastern half becoming the Division of Menzies. It was named after three Wurundjeri Aboriginal Australian men who supposedly made the Batman Treaty with the party of early colonial settler and one of the founders of Melbourne, John Batman in 1835.

The area is closely associated with the Heidelberg School art movement of the late 19th century, and in 1915 architect Walter Burley Griffin was commissioned to design a residential subdivision in the area. Griffin became a resident and designed numerous houses in the area. The renowned Montsalvat artists' colony is also located within the Division. The Olympic Village in Heidelberg West housed the thousands of athletes who participated in the 1956 Olympic Games.

The Division has always been a marginal-to-safe Labor seat. It was first held by Peter Staples, who served as a minister under Bob Hawke and Paul Keating. Staples retired in 1996 and was replaced by Jenny Macklin, who has held the seat since. Macklin served as Deputy Leader of the Australian Labor Party under Simon Crean, Mark Latham and Kim Beazley, as well as a minister under Kevin Rudd and Julia Gillard. In 2018, Macklin announced her retirment from politics leaving the seat open for a new candidate at the 2019 Australian federal election.

MembersEdit

Image Member Party Term Notes
    Peter Staples
(1947–)
Labor 1 December 1984
29 January 1996
Previously held the Division of Diamond Valley. Served as minister under Hawke and Keating. Retired
    Jenny Macklin
(1953–)
Labor 2 March 1996
5 July 2018
Served as minister under Rudd and Gillard.Retired
Kate Thwaites Labor 19 May 2019 –

Election resultsEdit

2019 Australian federal election: Jagajaga[1]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labor Kate Thwaites 37,224 42.37 +1.25
Liberal Richard Welch 34,345 39.09 −1.00
Greens Paul Kennedy 11,903 13.55 +0.12
United Australia Maria Rigoni 3,305 3.76 +3.76
Rise Up Australia Jeff Truscott 1,074 1.22 +1.22
Total formal votes 87,851 101.68 −0.03
Informal votes 2,813 3.26 +0.03
Turnout 86,403 80.32 −13.10
Two-party-preferred result
Labor Kate Thwaites 49,446 56.28 +0.68
Liberal Richard Welch 38,405 43.72 −0.68

Results are not final. Last updated 7:00pm AEST on 23 May 2019.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Jagajaga, VIC, Tally Room 2019, Australian Electoral Commission.

External linksEdit