Division of Eden-Monaro

The Division of Eden-Monaro is an Australian electoral division in the state of New South Wales.

Eden-Monaro
Australian House of Representatives Division
Division of EDEN-MONARO 2016.png
Division of Eden-Monaro in New South Wales, as of the 2016 federal election.
Created1901
MPKristy McBain
PartyLabor
NamesakeEden and Monaro
Electors114,244 (2020)
Area41,617 km2 (16,068.4 sq mi)
DemographicRural

The previous member, Mike Kelly resigned due to ill health on 30 April 2020. The seat was filled at a by-election on 4 July 2020.

HistoryEdit

The town of Eden and
the region of Monaro, the division's namesakes

The division was proclaimed in 1900, and was one of the original 65 divisions to be contested at the first federal election. It is named for the town of Eden and the Monaro district of southern New South Wales.

Its boundaries have changed very little throughout its history, and it includes the towns of Yass, Bega and Cooma and the city of Queanbeyan. It completely surrounds the Australian Capital Territory.

Until 1943 the seat was held by non-Labor parties for all but three years. Since then, it has been consistently marginal, though it was in Labor hands for all but one term from 1943 to 1975. This is mainly because of the seat's demographics. The Eden area tilts toward the Liberals; most of the area is part of the historically safe Liberal state seat of Bega. In contrast, the Monaro area has traditionally been more of a swing area.

Up to the 2016 election, Eden-Monaro was long regarded as Australia's most well-known "bellwether seat". From the 1972 election until the 2013 election, Eden-Monaro was won by the party that also won the election. During this time, all of its sitting members were defeated at the polls – none retired or resigned.

Liberal incumbent Peter Hendy was defeated by Labor's Mike Kelly at the 2016 election. Kelly had previously represented Eden-Monaro from 2007 to 2013. Kelly's 2016 victory made him the seat's first opposition MP elected since 1969. The nation's new bellwether became the seat of Robertson – continually won by the party that also won government since the 1983 election. "Best" bellwether aside, ABC psephologist Antony Green classed a total of eleven electorates as bellwethers in his 2016 election guide.[1]

MembersEdit

Image Member Party Term Notes
    (Sir) Austin Chapman
(1864–1926)
Protectionist 29 March 1901
26 May 1909
Previously held the New South Wales Legislative Assembly seat of Braidwood. Served as Chief Government Whip in the House under Barton. Served as minister under Deakin and Bruce. Died in office
  Commonwealth Liberal 26 May 1909 –
17 February 1917
  Nationalist 17 February 1917 –
12 January 1926
    John Perkins
(1878–1954)
Nationalist 6 March 1926
12 October 1929
Previously held the New South Wales Legislative Assembly seat of Goulburn. Served as Chief Government Whip in the House under Bruce. Lost seat
    John Cusack
(1868–1956)
Labor 12 October 1929
19 December 1931
Previously held the New South Wales Legislative Assembly seat of Albury. Did not contest in 1931. Failed to win the Division of Cowper
    John Perkins
(1878–1954)
United Australia 19 December 1931
21 August 1943
Served as minister under Lyons, Page and Menzies. Lost seat
    Allan Fraser
(1902–1977)
Labor 21 August 1943
26 November 1966
Lost seat
    Dugald Munro
(1930–1973)
Liberal 26 November 1966
25 October 1969
Lost seat
    Allan Fraser
(1902–1977)
Labor 25 October 1969
2 November 1972
Retired. Later elected to the Australian Capital Territory House of Assembly seat of Fraser in 1975
    Bob Whan
(1933–2015)
Labor 2 December 1972
13 December 1975
Lost seat
    Murray Sainsbury
(1940–)
Liberal 13 December 1975
5 March 1983
Lost seat
    Jim Snow
(1934–)
Labor 5 March 1983
2 March 1996
Lost seat
    Gary Nairn
(1951–)
Liberal 2 March 1996
24 November 2007
Served as minister under Howard. Lost seat
    Mike Kelly
(1960–)
Labor 24 November 2007
7 September 2013
Served as minister under Gillard and Rudd. Lost seat
    Peter Hendy
(1962–)
Liberal 7 September 2013
2 July 2016
Served as minister under Abbott and Turnbull. Lost seat
    Mike Kelly
(1960–)
Labor 2 July 2016
30 April 2020
Resigned due to ill health
    Kristy McBain
(1982–)
Labor 4 July 2020
present
Incumbent

Election resultsEdit

2020 Eden-Monaro by-election[2]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Fiona Kotvojs 36,388 38.33 +1.33
Labor Kristy McBain 34,073 35.89 −3.28
National Trevor Hicks 6,052 6.38 −0.57
Greens Cathy Griff 5,385 5.67 −3.11
Shooters, Fishers, Farmers Matthew Stadtmiller 5,066 5.34 +5.34
HEMP Michael Balderstone 2,154 2.27 +2.27
Independent Karen Porter 1,218 1.28 +1.28
Science James Jansson 1,071 1.13 +1.13
Sustainable Australia Joy Angel 944 0.99 +0.99
Liberal Democrats Dean McCrae 651 0.69 +0.69
Independent James Holgate 636 0.67 −1.23
Christian Democrats Narelle Storey 614 0.65 −0.52
Independent Riccardo Bosi 513 0.54 +0.54
Australian Federation Jason Potter 170 0.18 +0.18
Total formal votes 94,935 93.29 +0.09
Informal votes 6,832 6.71 −0.09
Turnout 101,767 89.08 −4.23
Two-party-preferred result
Labor Kristy McBain 47,835 50.39 −0.46
Liberal Fiona Kotvojs 47,100 49.61 +0.46
Labor hold Swing −0.46
 
Diagram of preference flows at the Eden-Monaro by-election

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ The Bellwether Contests: Antony Green ABC
  2. ^ "Eden-Monaro, NSW". Australian Electoral Commission. Retrieved 22 August 2020.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 36°17′31″S 149°20′38″E / 36.292°S 149.344°E / -36.292; 149.344