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The District Council of Yatala North was a local government area of South Australia on the central Adelaide Plains from 1868 to 1933. It was split from the abolished District Council of Yatala on 18 June 1868.[1] The council area ranged approximately from Dry Creek in the south to the Little Para River in the north.

District Council of Yatala North
South Australia
District Council of Yatala North is located in South Australia
District Council of Yatala North
District Council of Yatala North
Coordinates34°46′S 138°38′E / 34.767°S 138.633°E / -34.767; 138.633Coordinates: 34°46′S 138°38′E / 34.767°S 138.633°E / -34.767; 138.633
Established1868
Abolished1933
LGAs around District Council of Yatala North:
Munno Para West Munno Para West Munno Para East
Birkenhead
Port Adelaide
Rosewater
District Council of Yatala North Highercombe
Tea Tree Gully
Birkenhead
Port Adelaide
Rosewater
Yatala South/Enfield Tea Tree Gully

HistoryEdit

 
Map showing the boundaries of Yatala North and Yatala South immediately after the 1868 split, with relation to the Hundred of Yatala (shaded in green and yellow) and the Hundred of Port Adelaide (shaded in cyan and orange)

The council was established in 1868 when the District Council of Yatala was divided at the Dry Creek and the Dry Creek-Port Adelaide railway line into the District Councils of Yatala South and Yatala North.[1][2]

In 1933 the council was abolished to form, along with a large portion of the adjacent north District Council of Munno Para West (which was abolished at the same time), the new District Council of Salisbury, which ultimately became the modern City of Salisbury.

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b Marsden, Susan (2012). "A History of South Australian Councils to 1936" (PDF). Local Government Association of South Australia. Retrieved 23 February 2016. Formed on 18 June 1868 when the original Yatala Council (see Yatala) was divided into DCs of Yatala North and Yatala South.
  2. ^ "Our History: Enfield History". City of Port Adelaide Enfield. Archived from the original on 3 April 2015. Retrieved 23 February 2011. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)