Dimitrios Voulgaris

Dimitrios Voulgaris (Greek: Δημήτριος Βούλγαρης; 20 December 1802 – 10 January 1877)[1] was a Greek revolutionary fighter during the Greek War of Independence of 1821 who became a politician after independence. He was nicknamed "Tsoumpes" ("Τσουμπές") after the distinctive Ottoman-style robe he wore.

Dimitrios Voulgaris
Δημήτριος Βούλγαρης
Dimitrios Voulgaris.png
Prime Minister of Greece
In office
11 October 1855 – 25 November 1857
MonarchOtto I
Preceded byAlexandros Mavrokordatos
Succeeded byAthanasios Miaoulis
In office
23 October 1862 – 21 February 1863
Monarchvacant
Preceded byGennaios Kolokotronis
Succeeded byAristeidis Moraitinis
In office
6 November 1863 – 17 March 1864
MonarchGeorge I
Preceded byBenizelos Roufos
Succeeded byKonstantinos Kanaris
In office
15 November 1865 – 18 November 1865
Preceded byEpameinondas Deligeorgis
Succeeded byAlexandros Koumoundouros
In office
21 June 1866 – 30 December 1866
Preceded byBenizelos Roufos
Succeeded byAlexandros Koumoundouros
In office
6 February 1868 – 6 February 1869
Preceded byAristeidis Moraitinis
Succeeded byThrasyvoulos Zaimis
In office
6 January 1872 – 20 July 1872
Preceded byThrasyvoulos Zaimis
Succeeded byEpameinondas Deligeorgis
In office
21 February 1874 – 8 May 1875
Preceded byEpameinondas Deligeorgis
Succeeded byCharilaos Trikoupis
Personal details
Born(1802-12-20)20 December 1802
Hydra, Ottoman Greece
Died10 January 1877(1877-01-10) (aged 74)
Athens, Kingdom of Greece
Signature
Military service
Allegiance
Branch/serviceFlag of Greece.svg Hellenic Navy
Battles/warsGreek War of Independence

BiographyEdit

Voulgaris was an Arvanite,[2] born on December 20th 1802 on the island of Hydra in the Saronic Islands. When the War of Independence broke out, he participated in naval operations against the forces of the Ottoman Empire. After independence was achieved, Voulgaris became involved in politics as a bitter opponent of Governor Ioannis Kapodistrias.

In 1843, Voulgaris was appointed to the newly created Senate and in 1847, he became Minister for the Navy. He became the 11th Prime Minister for the first time in 1855 during the Crimean War. He was elected to the post again in elections marked by widespread corruption and fraud.

Voulgaris was involved in the coup against Otto of Greece in October 1862 and became Prime Minister once more. In total, he was Prime Minister eight times; however, his terms in office where characterised by corruption. Finally, in 1875, Charilaos Trikoupis published his famous article "Who is to blame?" ("Τις πταίει;") in the Athens daily "Times" ("Καιροί") concerning the waste and corruption of the government. After a strong public outcry, King George I dismissed Voulgaris. Many of his associates were indicted on a variety of charges and Voulgaris himself took ill and died in Athens on 10 January 1878.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Note: Greece officially adopted the Gregorian calendar on 16 February 1923 (which became 1 March). All dates prior to that, unless specifically denoted, are Old Style.
  2. ^ Ι. Καργάκος, Σαράντος (1999). ΑΛΒΑΝΟΙ, ΑΡΒΑΝΙΤΕΣ, ΕΛΛΗΝΕΣ. Athens: Ι. ΣΙΔΕΡΗΣ. . Είναι ενδεικτικό ότι οι περισσότεροι στρατηγοί, ναύαρχοι και πρωθυπουργοί της Ελλάδος ήσαν Αρβανίτες (Δημ. Βούλγαρης, Μιαούληδες, Κουντουριώτηδες,..."

External linksEdit


Political offices
Preceded by Prime Minister of Greece
11 October 1855 – 25 November 1857
Succeeded by
Preceded by Prime Minister of Greece
23 October 1862 – 21 February 1863
Succeeded by
Preceded by Prime Minister of Greece
6 November 1863 – 17 March 1864
Succeeded by
Preceded by Prime Minister of Greece
15 November 1865 – 18 November 1865
Succeeded by
Preceded by Prime Minister of Greece
21 June 1866 – 30 December 1866
Succeeded by
Preceded by Prime Minister of Greece
6 February 1868 – 6 February 1869
Succeeded by
Preceded by Prime Minister of Greece
6 January 1872 – 20 July 1872
Succeeded by
Preceded by Prime Minister of Greece
21 February 1874 – 8 May 1875
Succeeded by