Diamond D

Joseph Kirkland (born April 5, 1968), also known as Diamond D, is an American hip hop MC and record producer from The Bronx, New York City,[1] and one of the founding members of the Diggin' in the Crates Crew, abbreviated as D.I.T.C.[2]

Diamond D
Diamond D at A3C in Atlanta
Diamond D at A3C in Atlanta
Background information
Born (1968-04-05) April 5, 1968 (age 52)
Bronx, New York City, United States[1]
GenresHip hop
Occupation(s)Record producer, rapper
InstrumentsKeyboard
Sampler
Drum machine
Turntable
Years active1987–present
LabelsChemistry/Mercury/PolyGram Records
Diamond Mine Records
Babygrande Records

Early YearsEdit

Growing up in Forest Houses in The Bronx, Diamond D was influenced by local DJs, DJ Hutch and DJ Supreme. During his youth the two DJs would let him perform on their turntables.[3] At the beginning of his career as a producer, Diamond spent many hours at Jazzy Jay's studio on Allerton Avenue in The Bronx. He credits Jay for inspiring him to buy a sampler and teaching him various production techniques.[3] In a 2017 interview he said, "I learned about 95% of my production skills from him. And he was ahead of his time."[4]

Recording CareerEdit

In addition to Jazzy Jay's teachings, Diamond credited Brand Nubian member Grand Puba as his inspiration to start rapping.[5] An early guest appearance on A Tribe Called Quest's The Low End Theory track "Show Business" helped make people more aware of him as an artist.[3]

The following year he released his debut record Stunts, Blunts and Hip Hop. In a 2017 interview Diamond described the album as, "just a collection of beats and records I was just setting aside. It was more about, 'One day I want to do something with this' ideas. And about 80% of that album I got from those records."

Diamond's favorite experience from making Stunts, Blunts, and Hip Hop was recording the vocals for the song "Check One, Two."[4] He credits producer The 45 King with clearing the samples for that beat.[4] It took him 30 minutes to construct the beat one of the album's best-known tracks, "Sally Got A One Track Mind".

In 1996 Diamond won a Grammy Award for his production on the title track from The Fugees' The Score album. He later described the experience as "just a bad memory" and declined to talk about it in an interview.[6]

To promote his 1997 sophomore record Hatred, Passions and Infidelity, Mercury Records compiled a promotional vinyl called Diamond Jewels that included the Stunts, Blunts, and Hip Hop songs "Best Kept Secret', "*!*! What U Heard", and "Sally Got A One Track Mind".[7]

DiscographyEdit

AlbumsEdit

Album information
Stunts, Blunts and Hip Hop
  • Released: September 22, 1992
  • Billboard 200 chart position: -
  • R&B/Hip-Hop chart position: #47
  • Singles: "Best Kept Secret"/"Freestyle (Yo, That's That Shit)," "Sally Got a One Track Mind"/"Check One, Two," "Fuck What U Heard"/"I'm Outta Here"
Hatred, Passions and Infidelity
  • Released: August 26, 1997
  • Billboard 200 chart position: -
  • R&B/Hip-Hop chart position: #40
  • Singles: "The Hiatus"/"No Wonduh (The Projects)," "J.D.'s Revenge"/"This One"
Grown Man Talk
  • Released: 2003
  • Billboard 200 chart position: -
  • R&B/Hip-Hop chart position: -
  • Singles:
I'm Not Playin' (with Master Rob as Ultimate Force)
  • Released: June, 2007
  • Billboard 200 chart position: -
  • R&B/Hip-Hop chart position: -
  • Singles: "I'm Not Playing", "Girls/I'm in Effect/Supreme Diamond D"
The Huge Hefner Chronicles
  • Released: 2008
  • Billboard 200 chart position: -
  • R&B/Hip-Hop chart position: -
  • Singles:
The Diam Piece
  • Released: September 30, 2014
  • Billboard 200 chart position: -
  • R&B/Hip-Hop chart position: -
  • Singles: "Rap Life"
The Diam Piece 2
  • Released: May 10, 2019

As featured artistEdit

List of singles, with selected chart positions, showing year released and album name
Title Year Peak chart positions Album
US US
R&B
US
Rap
"One for the Money"
(Royce da 5'9" featuring Skillz and Diamond D)
2012 Non-album single

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Colin Larkin, ed. (2000). The Virgin Encyclopedia of Nineties Music (First ed.). Virgin Books. pp. 121/2. ISBN 0-7535-0427-8.
  2. ^ John Bush. "Diamond D | Biography". AllMusic. Retrieved 2015-05-22.
  3. ^ a b c Isenberg, Daniel (July 14, 2011). "Diamond D Tells All: The Stories Behind His Classic Records". Retrieved August 14, 2020.
  4. ^ a b c Ducker, Jesse (December 29, 2017). "INTERVIEW: The Enduring Duality & Dynamism of Hip-Hop Legend Diamond D". Albumism. Retrieved August 14, 2020.
  5. ^ Garcia, Bobbito (June–July 1995). "Sound Check: Bobbito Garcia plays the tracks; Diamond D states the facts". Vibe: 35 – via Google Books.CS1 maint: date format (link)
  6. ^ Ettelson, Robbie (February 12, 2014). "Diamond D – The Unkut Interview". Unkut. Retrieved August 14, 2020.
  7. ^ Nelson, Havelock (August 2, 1997). "Diamond D's Hip-Hop 'Hiatus' Ends with 'Hatred' on Mercury". Billboard: 27 and 32 – via Google Books.

External linksEdit