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The Deputy Prime Minister of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (Vietnamese: Phó Thủ tướng Cộng hòa xã hội chủ nghĩa Việt Nam), known as Deputy Chairman of the Council of Ministers (Vietnamese: Phó Chủ tịch Hội đồng Bộ trưởng) from 1981 to 1992, is one of the highest offices within the Central Government. The deputy prime minister has throughout its history been responsible for helping the prime minister to handle Vietnam's internal policies. Since Vietnam is a one-party state, with the Communist Party of Vietnam being the sole party allowed by the constitution, all the deputy prime ministers of the Democratic Republic and the Socialist Republic have been members of the party while holding office. There are currently five deputy prime ministers; Trương Hòa Bình, Phạm Bình Minh, Vũ Đức Đam, Vương Đình Huệ, and Trịnh Đình Dũng.

Deputy Prime Minister of the
Socialist Republic of Vietnam
Phó Thủ tướng Chính phủ nước Cộng hòa Xã hội chủ nghĩa Việt Nam
Emblem of Vietnam.svg
StyleThe Honourable
Member ofGovernment of Vietnam
Reports toPrime Minister
SeatHanoi, Vietnam
AppointerThe Prime Minister
Term lengthNo fixed restrictions
Inaugural holderNguyễn Hải Thần
Formation27 September 1945

The Permanent Deputy Prime Minister of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, known as The First Deputy Prime Minister (Vietnamese: Phó Thủ tướng Thường trực Cộng hòa xã hội chủ nghĩa Việt Nam), is a member of the Central Government and a member of the Politburo. The Permanent Deputy Prime Minister (1st) is elected and determined by the Prime Minister.

Contents

Deputy Prime Ministers of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (1945–1976)Edit

No.
[note 2]
Rank
[note 3]
Name
(birth–death)
Portrait Took office Left office Prime Minister
1 1
Nguyễn Hải Thần
(1878–1958)
27 September 1945 1 June 1946 Hồ Chí Minh
2 2 6 Phạm Văn Đồng
(1906–2000)
  25 June 1947 20 September 1955 Hồ Chí Minh
3 3
Phan Kế Toại
(1892–1973)
20 September 1955 6 June 1973 Phạm Văn Đồng
4 4 5 Võ Nguyên Giáp
(1911–2013)
  20 September 1955 2 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng
7
5 5 2 Trường Chinh
(1907–1988)
  April 1958 10 June 1960 Phạm Văn Đồng
6 6 11 Phạm Hùng
(1912–1988)
April 1958 10 June 1971 Phạm Văn Đồng
5
7 7 10 Nguyễn Duy Trinh
(1910–1985)
15 June 1960 2 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng
9
8 8 12 Lê Thanh Nghị
(1911–1989)
15 June 1960 2 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng
10
9 9
Nguyễn Côn
(born 1917)
November 1967 2 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng
10 10
Đỗ Mười
(1917–2018)
  December 1969 2 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng
11 11
Hoàng Anh
(1912–2016)
April 1971 2 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng
12 12
Trần Hữu Dực
(1910–1993)
March 1974 2 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng
13 13
Phan Trọng Tuệ
(1917–1991)
March 1974 2 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng
14 14
Đặng Việt Châu
(1914–1987)
March 1974 2 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng

Deputy Prime Ministers of the Republic of South Vietnam (1969–1976)Edit

No.
[note 2]
Name
(birth–death)
Portrait Took office Left office Prime Minister
1 Phùng Văn Cung
(1909–1987)
6 June 1969 2 July 1976 Huỳnh Tấn Phát
2 Nguyễn Văn Kiết
(1906–1987)
6 June 1969 2 July 1976 Huỳnh Tấn Phát
3 Nguyễn Đóa
(1896–1993)
6 June 1969 2 July 1976 Huỳnh Tấn Phát
4 Trịnh Đình Thảo
(1901–1986)
6 June 1969 2 July 1976 Huỳnh Tấn Phát

Deputy Prime Ministers of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (1976–present)Edit

No.
[note 2]
Rank
[note 3]
Name
(birth–death)
Portrait Took office Left office Prime Minister
1 3 7 Võ Nguyên Giáp
(1911–2013)
  2 July 1976 8 August 1991 Phạm Văn Đồng
6
Phạm Hùng
Đỗ Mười
2 6 5 Phạm Hùng
(1912–1988)
2 July 1976 22 June 1987 Phạm Văn Đồng
4
2
3 8 10 Lê Thanh Nghị
(1911–89)
2 July 1976 4 July 1981 Phạm Văn Đồng
8
4 10 17 Đỗ Mười
(1917–2018)
  2 July 1976 22 June 1987 Phạm Văn Đồng
11
4
Phạm Hùng
5 15
Huỳnh Tấn Phát
(1913–1989)
2 July 1976 June 1982 Phạm Văn Đồng
6 16 13 Võ Chí Công
(1912–2011)
2 July 1976 April 1982 Phạm Văn Đồng
7
7 17 15 Tố Hữu
(1920–2002)
February 1980 June 1986 Phạm Văn Đồng
9
8 18
Nguyễn Lam
(1922–1990)
February 1980 April 1982 Phạm Văn Đồng
9 19
Trần Quỳnh
(1920–2005)
January 1981 February 1987 Phạm Văn Đồng
10 20 10 Võ Văn Kiệt
(1922–2008)
  April 1982 8 August 1991 Phạm Văn Đồng
5
Phạm Hùng
Đỗ Mười
3 Đỗ Mười
11 21 16 Đồng Sỹ Nguyên
(1923–2019)
April 1982 8 August 1991 Phạm Văn Đồng
9
Phạm Hùng
Đỗ Mười
Đỗ Mười
12 22
Vũ Đình Liệu
(1918–2005)
April 1982 February 1987 Phạm Văn Đồng
13 23
Trần Phương
(born 1927)
April 1982 February 1987 Phạm Văn Đồng
6 16 3 Võ Chí Công
(1912–2011)
27 June 1986 22 June 1987 Phạm Văn Đồng
14 24 8 Nguyễn Cơ Thạch
(1921–1998)
  February 1987 8 August 1991 Phạm Văn Đồng
Phạm Hùng
Đỗ Mười
Đỗ Mười
15 25
Nguyễn Ngọc Trìu
(born 1926)
February 1987 May 1988 Phạm Văn Đồng
Phạm Hùng
16 26
Trần Đức Lương
(born 1936)
  February 1987 29 September 1997 Phạm Văn Đồng
Phạm Hùng
Đỗ Mười
Võ Văn Kiệt
12
Phan Văn Khải
17 27
Nguyễn Khánh
(born 1928)
February 1987 29 September 1997 Phạm Văn Đồng
Phạm Hùng
Đỗ Mười
Võ Văn Kiệt
Võ Văn Kiệt
Phan Văn Khải
18 28
Đoàn Duy Thành
(born 1929)
February 1987 May 1988 Phạm Văn Đồng
Phạm Hùng
19 29
Nguyễn Văn Chính
(1924—2016)
February 1987 May 1988 Phạm Văn Đồng
Phạm Hùng
20 30
Phan Văn Khải
(1933–2018)
8 August 1991 29 September 1997 Đỗ Mười
Võ Văn Kiệt
8 Võ Văn Kiệt
7
3
21 31 15 Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
(born 1949)
29 September 1997 27 June 2006 Phan Văn Khải
5
4
22 32 8 Nguyễn Mạnh Cầm
(born 1929)
  29 September 1997 12 August 2002 Phan Văn Khải
23 33
Nguyễn Công Tạn
(1935–2014)
29 September 1997 12 August 2002 Phan Văn Khải
24 34
Ngô Xuân Lộc
(born 1940)
29 September 1997 11 December 1999 Phan Văn Khải
25 35
Phạm Gia Khiêm
(born 1944)
  29 September 1997 3 August 2011 Phan Văn Khải
Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
7 Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
26 36
Vũ Khoan
(born 1937)
  12 August 2002 27 June 2006 Phan Văn Khải
27 37
Nguyễn Sinh Hùng
(born 1946)
  28 June 2006 25 July 2011 Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
28 38 9 Trương Vĩnh Trọng
(born 1942)
  28 June 2006 19 January 2012 Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
29 39
Hoàng Trung Hải
(born 1959)
  2 August 2007 8 April 2016 Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
30 40
Nguyễn Thiện Nhân
(born 1953)
  2 August 2007 11 November 2013 Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
31 41 3 Nguyễn Xuân Phúc
(born 1954)
2 August 2011 7 April 2016 Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
6
32 42
Vũ Văn Ninh
(born 1955)
  2 August 2011 8 April 2016 Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
33 43
Phạm Bình Minh
(born 1959)
13 November 2013 Incumbent Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
13 Nguyễn Xuân Phúc
34 44
Vũ Đức Đam
(born 1963)
  13 November 2013 Incumbent Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
Nguyễn Xuân Phúc
35 45 11 Vương Đình Huệ
(born 1957)
  9 April 2016 Incumbent Nguyễn Xuân Phúc
36 46 15 Trương Hòa Bình
(born 1955)
9 April 2016 Incumbent Nguyễn Xuân Phúc
37 47
Trịnh Đình Dũng
(born 1956)
9 April 2016 Incumbent Nguyễn Xuân Phúc

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

1.^ The Politburo of the Central Committee is the highest decision-making body of the CPV and the Central Government. The membership composition, and the order of rank of the individual Politburo members is decided in an election within the newly formed Central Committee in the aftermath of a Party Congress.[1] The Central Committee can overrule the Politburo, but that does not happen often.[2]
2.^ These numbers are official. The "—" denotes acting deputy prime minister. The first column shows how many deputy prime ministers there have been in Vietnamese history, while the second show how many deputy prime ministers there was in that state.
3.^ The Central Committee when it convenes for its first session after being elected by a National Party Congress elects the Politburo.[1] According to David Koh, in interviews with several high-standing Vietnamese officials, the Politburo ranking is based upon the number of approval votes by the Central Committee. Lê Hồng Anh, the Minister of Public Security, was ranked 2nd in the 10th Politburo because he received the second-highest number of approval votes. Another example being Tô Huy Rứa of the 10th Politburo, he was ranked lowest because he received the lowest approval vote of the 10th Central Committee when he standing for election for a seat in the Politburo. This system was implemented at the 1st plenum of the 10th Central Committee.[3] The Politburo ranking functioned as an official order of precedence before the 10th Party Congress, and some believe it still does.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Van & Cooper 1983, p. 69.
  2. ^ Abuza, Zachary (2002). "The Lessons of Le Kha Phieu: Changing Rules in Vietnamese politics" (PDF). Contemporary Southeast Asia. 24 (1): 121–45. doi:10.1355/CS24-1H. Retrieved 27 February 2015.
  3. ^ Koh 2008, p. 666.

BibliographyEdit