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The Deep Lens Survey (DLS, short for "Deep Gravitational Lensing Survey") is an ultra-deep multi-band optical survey of seven 4 square degree fields. Mosaic CCD imagers at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory's Blanco (Cerro Tololo) and Mayall telescopes (Kitt Peak) are being used. The deep fields took five years to complete (2001–2006), in four bands: B, V, R, and z', to 29/29/29/28 mag per square arcsecond surface brightness. Optical transient events (including moving objects such as minor planets and comets) and supernova candidates are released in real time.

Deep Lens Survey
Survey typeastronomical survey Edit this on Wikidata
TargetGravitational lens Edit this on Wikidata
Minor planets discovered: 79 [1]
see § List of discovered minor planets

SurveyEdit

The main goal of the survey is to produce unbiased maps of the large-scale structure of the mass distribution beyond the local universe, via very deep multicolor imaging of seven 2-degree fields and colour-redshifts. The shear of distant galaxies induced by the mass of foreground structures will be measured. These weak-lensing observations are sensitive to all forms of clumped mass and will yield unbiased mass maps with resolution of one arcmin in the plane of the sky (about 120 kpc/h at z = 0.2), in multiple redshift ranges. These maps will measure for the first time the change in large scale structure from z = 1 to the present epoch, and test the current theories of structure formation, which predict that mass in the low-redshift universe has a particular filamentary/sheetlike structure. These observations will directly constrain the clustering properties of matter, and, when compared with the results from microwave background anisotropy missions, will test the basic theory of structure formation via gravitational instability.

While this is the main goal of the survey, a wide-field imaging survey has a myriad of other uses. In addition, the group is acquiring the data in a way which makes it possible to detect variable objects on scales of hours to months, by spreading observations of individual subfields over 4 runs over two years.

DiscoveriesEdit

List of discovered minor planetsEdit

(46060) 2001 DL88 26 February 2001 list
(89886) 2002 CT230 14 February 2002 list
(104314) 2000 EC203 5 March 2000 list
(107558) 2001 DK85 23 February 2001 list
(107868) 2001 FT85 26 March 2001 list
(114722) 2003 GN33 3 April 2003 list
(143352) 2003 AB85 7 January 2003 list
(144688) 2004 FG145 29 March 2004 list
(147428) 2003 GM54 1 April 2003 list
(148990) 2001 YX92 17 December 2001 list
(154544) 2003 GP33 4 April 2003 list
(156423) 2002 AD92 12 January 2002 list
(159758) 2003 FZ122 31 March 2003 list
(160842) 2000 YE142 21 December 2000 list
(189839) 2003 AQ83 4 January 2003 list
(193671) 2001 DV84 23 February 2001 list
(196401) 2003 GM33 3 April 2003 list
(205413) 2001 FX85 26 March 2001 list
(208544) 2002 AE92 12 January 2002 list
(216501) 2000 EP203 5 March 2000 list
(220530) 2004 FT18 26 March 2004 list
(223271) 2003 GY32 1 April 2003 list
(223272) 2003 GC33 1 April 2003 list
(226345) 2003 FM122 31 March 2003 list
(231056) 2005 JG63 3 May 2005 list
(231914) 2000 YT140 19 December 2000 list
(242393) 2004 FO18 26 March 2004 list
(242599) 2005 JG45 2 May 2005 list
(244218) 2002 AA93 14 January 2002 list
(245421) 2005 JW63 4 May 2005 list
(245431) 2005 JX108 6 May 2005 list
(252143) 2000 YK141 20 December 2000 list
(257954) 2000 YY141 20 December 2000 list
(264468) 2001 FY85 26 March 2001 list
(267852) 2003 UJ283 30 October 2003 list
(270019) 2001 FA86 26 March 2001 list
(270473) 2002 DV4 17 February 2002 list
(275636) 2000 EJ203 5 March 2000 list
(283757) 2003 EU61 8 March 2003 list
(285797) 2000 WN193 24 November 2000 list
(285835) 2001 DW83 23 February 2001 list
(287594) 2003 FK122 31 March 2003 list
(297152) 2010 UQ56 14 February 2002 list
(301831) 2011 QH14 5 March 2000 list
(302421) 2002 CU230 14 February 2002 list
(302806) 2003 AH83 4 January 2003 list
(302864) 2003 GJ54 1 April 2003 list
(306179) 2010 WA55 2 April 2003 list
(306339) 2011 SQ129 5 January 2003 list
(306581) 2000 ED204 6 March 2000 list
(317662) 2003 FY122 31 March 2003 list
(318601) 2005 JX45 3 May 2005 list
(321876) 2010 SG7 23 February 2001 list
(337289) 2000 WL194 25 November 2000 list
(338450) 2003 EG55 9 March 2003 list
(348151) 2004 FS18 26 March 2004 list
(354650) 2005 JR45 3 May 2005 list
(357315) 2003 FL122 31 March 2003 list
(360809) 2005 JH63 3 May 2005 list
(365944) 2012 AZ16 9 March 2003 list
(368103) 2013 EN 3 May 2005 list
(370195) 2002 CU231 15 February 2002 list
(370686) 2004 FS123 26 March 2004 list
(385437) 2003 GH55 1 April 2003 list
(393559) 2003 GO33 3 April 2003 list
(397214) 2006 GU37 2 April 2006 list
(415789) 2000 WO193 24 November 2000 list
(416827) 2005 JU45 3 May 2005 list
(416834) 2005 JY108 6 May 2005 list
(416835) 2005 JA109 6 May 2005 list
(427831) 2005 JQ108 4 May 2005 list
(434011) 2000 YU140 19 December 2000 list
(455743) 2005 JV45 3 May 2005 list
(461503) 2003 FJ122 31 March 2003 list
(461672) 2005 JM22 6 May 2005 list
(464869) 2005 JL22 4 May 2005 list
(464881) 2005 JF177 5 May 2005 list
(468500) 2005 JR108 6 May 2005 list
(481053) 2005 JP45 3 May 2005 list

Galaxy clustersEdit

Significant discoveries
Cluster Date Notes Names Refs
DLSCL J0916.2+2951 2012 This is a dissociative galaxy cluster merger with a large separation between the baryonic and dark matter components. Musket Ball Cluster [2][3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Minor Planet Discoverers (by number)". Minor Planet Center. 12 January 2017. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  2. ^ Dawson, William A.; Wittman, David; Jee, M. James; Gee, Perry; Hughes, John P.; Tyson, J. Anthony; et al. (19 October 2011). "Discovery of a Dissociative Galaxy Cluster Merger with Large Physical Separation". The Astrophysical Journal Letters (published March 2012). 747 (2): 6. arXiv:1110.4391. Bibcode:2012ApJ...747L..42D. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/747/2/L42. L42.
  3. ^ Chandra X-Ray Observatory (12 April 2012). "DLSCL J0916.2+2951: Discovery of the Musket Ball Cluster". Harvard University.

External linksEdit