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Debbie Greenwood (born 16 September 1959 in Liverpool, Lancashire—now in Merseyside) is a British television presenter and a former beauty queen who won the title of Miss Great Britain in 1984.[1][2][3]

CareerEdit

Greenwood began her broadcasting career in 1984, presenting regional programmes for Granada Television.[4][5] She then moved on to the BBC's Breakfast Time (1985-1986),[2][3][6][7] which included broadcasting from a special studio outside Buckingham Palace for the wedding of Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson.[2] In 1986, she also appeared in the BBC Two comedy Naked Video; a reviewer of the first episode wrote, "Among the more hilarious moments was an interview with the father of a kidnap victim by Breakfast Time's Debbie Greenwood, a presenter who would make a cattle-tick blush."[8] During 1987-1989, she presented on BBC Radio 2 daytime programs,[9] beginning with standing in for Gloria Hunniford at Christmas 1987.[10] She later presented Streetwise (1989-1990) for The Channel 4 Daily.[2][11] She also presented the UK version of the short-lived game show Love Me, Love Me Not in 1988, as well as the more successful BBC quiz for schoolchildren First Class,[12] which aired on BBC1 from 1986 to 1988.[13]

Greenwood has since been seen on a variety of UK-based satellite and cable shopping channels, including TV Travel Shop, Bid TV, The Craft Channel,[14] and most notably, twelve years presenting for QVC,[5][15][16] starting in 2001.[17]

Personal lifeEdit

Greenwood is married to broadcaster Paul Coia, with whom she has two daughters.[16][18]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Miss Great Britain Previous Winners". missgreatbritain.co.uk. Retrieved 2013-01-20.
  2. ^ a b c d Jones, Ian (2004). Morning Glory: A History of British Breakfast Television. Kelly. pp. 78, 83, 105, 240, 242. ISBN 9781903053201. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  3. ^ a b Pulson, Diana (14 May 1986). "Pretty as a picture is the early morning girl". Liverpool Echo. p. 6. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  4. ^ "Screen dispute". The Times (The Times Digital Archive) (62157). London, England. 6 June 1985. p. 3. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  5. ^ a b "About Debbie Greenwood". Blogs.qvcuk.com. Archived from the original on September 5, 2012. Retrieved 2011-06-30.
  6. ^ West, Roy (13 May 1985). "Debbie comes through smiling". Liverpool Echo. pp. 1, 4. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  7. ^ Lawson, Mark (1 February 1986). "Long Distance Form 16: Breakfast Television. Just what spinach did for Popeye". The Times (The Times Digital Archive) (62359). London, England. p. 7. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  8. ^ Shakespeare, Nicholas (13 May 1986). "Bees will bumble". The Times (The Times Digital Archive) (62455). London, England. p. 15. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  9. ^ Jones, Tony; Seymour, Anthony (15 November 1989). "Between the Lines - Debbie Greenwood - collecting pennies". Newcastle Journal. Newcastle, Tyne & Wear, England. p. 5. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  10. ^ Our TV and Radio Correspondent (25 November 1987). "Radio 2 to have new presenters". The Daily Telegraph (41188). London, England. p. 3. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  11. ^ "Debbie Greenwood: Partying with Gloria Hunniford". Blogs.qvcuk.com. 2008-11-28. Archived from the original on 2011-10-06. Retrieved 2011-06-30.
  12. ^ Gunter, Barrie; McAleer, Jill L.; Clifford, Brian (1991). Children's views about television. Avebury. p. 91. ISBN 9781856280693. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  13. ^ "First Class". UKGameshows.com. Retrieved August 11, 2011.
  14. ^ Stevens, Philip (December 2015). "Crafty business". TVB Europe: 20–22. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  15. ^ GRAY, RICHARD (19 December 2010). "Hard Sell Soft Focus". The Sunday Times. London, England. pp. 38–39. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  16. ^ a b Stewart, Helen (9 September 2007). "Screen team struck a chord". The Sunday Times. London, England. p. 12. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  17. ^ PHILLIPS, MARTIN (18 July 2013). "Biggest thing on sellyvision". The Sun. pp. 22–23. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  18. ^ "Personal". Paul Coia. Retrieved 2011-06-30.