David Hawthorne (actor)

David Hawthorne (22 May 1888 – 18 June 1942) was a British stage and film actor.[1][2] He played the leading man in a number of films during the silent era, but later switched to character roles.[3] One of his more notable roles was that of Rob Roy MacGregor in the 1922 film Rob Roy.[4][5]

David Hawthorne
Actor David Hawthorne.jpg
as Rob Roy (1922)
Born
Charles Frederick Hawthorne

22 May 1888
Died18 June 1942(1942-06-18) (aged 54)
OccupationFilm actor
Stage actor
Years active1920 - 1937

His stage work included the original West End productions of Noël Coward's Sirocco in 1927, Somerset Maugham's For Services Rendered in 1932 and J.B. Priestley's Laburnum Grove in 1933, for which he reprised his performance as Inspector Stack in the 1936 film version.[6][7][8][9] A 1937 extract from Busman's Honeymmoon at the Comedy Theatre survives, showing him as a detective interviewing a witness, as filmed for Pathé News.[10]

Selected filmographyEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "David Hawthorne - Theatricalia". theatricalia.com.
  2. ^ "David Hawthorne". BFI.
  3. ^ McFarlane, Brian (16 May 2016). "The Encyclopedia of British Film: Fourth edition". Oxford University Press – via Google Books.
  4. ^ Richards p.187
  5. ^ "ARTS NEWS: Rob Roy silent film to open film festival, Queen portrait for Holyroodhouse, YDance win award". HeraldScotland.
  6. ^ "Production of Sirocco - Theatricalia". theatricalia.com.
  7. ^ Wearing, J. P. (15 May 2014). "The London Stage 1930-1939: A Calendar of Productions, Performers, and Personnel". Rowman & Littlefield – via Google Books.
  8. ^ Wearing, J. P. (15 May 2014). "The London Stage 1930-1939: A Calendar of Productions, Performers, and Personnel". Rowman & Littlefield – via Google Books.
  9. ^ "BFI Screenonline: Laburnum Grove (1936) Credits". www.screenonline.org.uk.
  10. ^ Pathé, British. "Busman's Honeymoon". www.britishpathe.com.

BibliographyEdit

  • Low, Rachael. History of the British Film, 1918-1929. George Allen & Unwin, 1971.
  • Richards, Jeffrey. Films and British National Identity: From Dickens to Dad's Army. Manchester University Press, 1997.

External linksEdit