David Drummond (businessman)

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David Carl Drummond (born March 6, 1963) is an American business executive and lawyer. He served as senior vice president (SVP) of corporate development and chief legal officer (CLO) for Alphabet Inc.,[2][3] and, formerly, for its subsidiary, Google.[4] Prior to joining Google, in 2002, Drummond was a partner at law firm Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati and then chief financial officer of software company SmartForce. Drummond retired from Alphabet on January 31, 2020.

David Drummond
DavidDrummond2010.jpg
Drummond in 2010
Born
David Carl Drummond

(1963-03-06) March 6, 1963 (age 57)[1]
Alma materSanta Clara University
Stanford Law School[1]
OccupationFormerly Senior vice president and chief legal officer, Alphabet Inc.

CareerEdit

Drummond earned a bachelor's degree in history from Santa Clara University in Santa Clara, California and a Juris Doctor from Stanford Law School.[5][6][7] Drummond's first time working with Google was in 1998 as a partner at the technology law firm Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati's corporate transactions group;[8] he was Google's first outside counsel.[1] Drummond worked with Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin to raise funding and incorporate the company.[9]

Drummond was Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of software company SmartForce from June 1999 until January 2002. In July 2007, Drummond and three other SmartForce executives settled accounting violation charges brought by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) resulting from an overstatement of the company’s net income by $127 million during a period of time from 1999 to 2002.[10] Drummond paid a $700,000 fine to the SEC;[11] he was also ordered to pay a $125,000 civil fine by the New Hampshire District Court.[12]

In February 2002, Drummond joined Google as Vice President of Corporate Development and General Counsel.[7] He became Google's Senior Vice President of Corporate Development in January 2006 and Chief Legal Officer in December 2006, positions he retained following Google's restructure into Alphabet Inc. in October 2015. He has also been Secretary at Google and Alphabet since 2002.[13]

During his tenure at Google, Drummond was involved in lawsuits the company fought against GEICO, Viacom, Microsoft and the Association of American Publishers. He played a central role in Google's right to be forgotten dispute in Europe and the company's exit from China in 2010. He also oversaw major acquisitions including YouTube, Android, DoubleClick and Motorola Mobility.[14][15] Drummond is an advocate for freedom of speech and diversity.[14]

Drummond was charged by the SEC in 2005 with causing Google to violate securities law because he failed to advise the company's board that the company was required to register $80 million in stock options used as compensation for employees. The SEC said in its press release, "By deciding Google could escape its disclosure requirements, and failing to inform the Board of the legal risks of his determination, Drummond caused the company to run afoul of the federal securities laws."[16] In January 2005, Google and Drummond settled the complaint by agreeing not to violate securities laws in the future. Neither Google nor Drummond paid a fine or acknowledged wrongdoing.[17]

Drummond and other Google executives were defendants in a trial in Italy which began in 2009 over a video of a child being bullied which had been uploaded to Google Video in 2006.[18] None of the executives charged had any involvement with the creation or posting of the video and Google removed the video after being notified by authorities.[19] The case could have had ramifications for content providers around the world.[20] In 2010, Drummond and two other Google executives were found guilty of privacy violations and handed six-month suspended sentences. They were cleared of defamation charges.[21] In December 2012, the convictions and sentences were overturned on appeal.[19]

Drummond joined Uber's board of directors in August 2013 after Google Ventures led a $360 million funding round for Uber. Drummond stepped down from the board in August 2016 amid reports he had be shut out of board meetings due to his conflict of interest on self-driving cars.[3] Drummond also sat on the board of Crisis Text Line, a not-for-profit organization, from 2012 to 2018.[22] In 2014, Drummond was appointed a board member at Kohlberg Kravis Roberts, where he sat on its conflicts committee.[9][23]

His compensation from Google's parent company, Alphabet Inc., was US$47,282,232 in 2018, US$664,252 in 2017, and US$664,387 in 2016.[24] Drummond is an investor and advisor to the media company Ozy.[22][25]

On January 10, 2020, it was announced that Drummond would leave Alphabet to retire, effective January 31, 2020[25],due to sexual misconduct complaints.[26] He will not receive an exit package.[14] In the months leading up to his announcement, Drummond sold off over $200 million of his Alphabet stock.[27]

Personal lifeEdit

Drummond has a son born in 2007 during an affair with Jennifer Blakely, at the time a Google employee in the department he oversaw.[28][22] Drummond's relationship with Blakely was detailed in a 2018 New York Times exposé on sexual misconduct by executives at Google.[28] Drummond married Corinne Dixon, an employee in Google's legal department, around September 2019.[29]

Alphabet's board of directors, including Drummond, were sued by shareholders in January 2019 for allegedly covering up the sexual misconduct by executives.[30] The board formed an independent committee and hired a law firm to investigate how executives handled the claims.[31][32]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "David Drummond". CNBC. Retrieved June 24, 2019.
  2. ^ Kokalitcheva, Kia. "Alphabet Executive Resigns from Uber's Board Amid Growing Rivalry". Fortune.
  3. ^ a b Bhuiyan, Johana (August 29, 2016). "Alphabet's David Drummond has left Uber's board over conflict of interest on self-driving cars". Vox. Archived from the original on October 8, 2019. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  4. ^ "BBC News - Google's Drummond calls for new NSA reforms". BBC News.
  5. ^ "State Bar of CA :: David C. Drummond". California Bar. Archived from the original on June 9, 2019. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  6. ^ "David Drummond - The 2011 TIME 100 Poll - TIME". TIME.com. April 4, 2011. Archived from the original on June 11, 2019. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  7. ^ a b "Management team". Google. Archived from the original on March 31, 2012. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  8. ^ Weisman, Robert (July 30, 2004). "Probe targets Google executive". The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on January 27, 2005. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  9. ^ a b Alden, William (March 17, 2014). "Google's Legal Chief Joins K.K.R.'s Board". DealBook. Archived from the original on October 1, 2019. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  10. ^ Wutkowski, Karey (July 19, 2007). "Google exec settles with SEC for SmartForce work". Reuters. Archived from the original on January 11, 2020. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  11. ^ Rosencrance, Linda (July 20, 2007). "Google's Top Legal Officer to Pay $700,000 in SEC Fines". PCWorld. Archived from the original on January 11, 2020. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  12. ^ Nystedt, Dan (July 20, 2007). "Google's chief legal officer slapped with SEC fines". ITworld. Archived from the original on January 11, 2020. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  13. ^ "Alphabet Inc. 2016 Proxy Statement". www.sec.gov. April 29, 2016. Archived from the original on January 11, 2020. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  14. ^ a b c Dave, Paresh (January 11, 2020). "Alphabet legal head Drummond exits, giving its new CEO chance to shake up team". Reuters. Archived from the original on January 10, 2020. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  15. ^ Bergen, Mark (January 10, 2020). "Alphabet's Top Lawyer to Retire Following Questions on Conduct". Bloomberg. Archived from the original on January 12, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  16. ^ "SEC Charges Google and its General Counsel David C. Drummond with Failure to Register Over $80 Million in Employee Stock Options Prior to IPO". www.sec.gov. Archived from the original on January 10, 2020. Retrieved August 29, 2019.
  17. ^ Delaney, Kevin J. (January 14, 2005). "Google, Its Lawyer Are Unscathed In SEC Investigation of Offering". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Archived from the original on August 19, 2016. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  18. ^ "Google bosses on trial in Italy". BBC News. September 30, 2009. Archived from the original on January 12, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  19. ^ a b Barry, Colleen (December 22, 2012). "Italian court overturns Google convictions". news.yahoo.com. Archived from the original on January 12, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  20. ^ "Google's content trial delayed". BBC News. June 23, 2009. Archived from the original on January 12, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  21. ^ "Google bosses convicted in Italy". BBC News. February 24, 2010. Archived from the original on January 12, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  22. ^ a b c O'Brien, Sara Ashley (August 30, 2019). "Top Google exec faces renewed scrutiny after former employee details alleged affair". CNN. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  23. ^ Bolland, Ian (March 17, 2014). "KKR appoint Google's David Drummond to Board of Directors". HITC. Archived from the original on January 10, 2020. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  24. ^ Page, Larry; Brin, Sergey; Hennessy, John L. (April 30, 2019). "ALPHABET INC Schedule 14A". U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Retrieved August 31, 2019.
  25. ^ a b Elias, Jennifer (January 10, 2020). "Alphabet's legal chief David Drummond is leaving the company". CNBC. Archived from the original on January 10, 2020. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  26. ^ Bensinger, Greg (January 10, 2020). "Google parent company's top lawyer to leave following scrutiny for potentially inappropriate relationships". Washington Post. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  27. ^ Statt, Nick (January 10, 2020). "Alphabet's top lawyer is leaving with no exit package following misconduct scandals". The Verge. Archived from the original on January 11, 2020. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  28. ^ a b Wakabayashi, Daisuke; Benner, Katie (October 25, 2018). "How Google Protected Andy Rubin, the 'Father of Android'". The New York Times. Retrieved October 25, 2018.
  29. ^ Elias, Jennifer (September 3, 2019). "Alphabet's legal chief, already in hot water over past relationship, married an employee this weekend". CNBC. Archived from the original on December 21, 2019. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  30. ^ D'Onfro, Jillian (January 10, 2019). "Alphabet's board sued for role in allegedly covering up sexual misconduct by senior execs". CNBC. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  31. ^ De Vynck, Gerrit (November 7, 2019). "Alphabet Board Investigates Executives Over Relationships". Bloomberg. Archived from the original on December 13, 2019. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  32. ^ Elias, Jennifer (December 13, 2019). "Alphabet gets two-month delay to reply to shareholder lawsuit over executive misconduct". CNBC. Archived from the original on January 6, 2020. Retrieved January 11, 2020.