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David Bradley (politician)

David T. Bradley[2] (born November 13, 1952 in Seattle, Washington) is an American politician and a Democratic member of the Arizona Senate representing District 10 since January 14, 2013. Bradley served non-consecutively in the Arizona State Legislature from January 2003 until January 10, 2011 in the Arizona House of Representatives District 28 seat. He is now a State Senator representing District 10 starting in 2012 after defeating incumbent Frank Antenori (R).

David Bradley
Member of the Arizona Senate
from the 10th[1] district
Assumed office
January 14, 2013
Preceded byLinda Gray
Member of the Arizona House of Representatives
from the 28th district
In office
January 2003 – January 10, 2011
Serving with Theodore Downing (2003–2007)
Steve Farley (2007–2011)
Personal details
Born (1952-11-13) November 13, 1952 (age 66)
Seattle, Washington
NationalityAmerican
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Debra D'Amore
ChildrenBrian Bradley, Nathan Bradley, Sean Bradley, Brooke D'Amore Bradley
ResidenceTucson, Arizona
Alma materUniversity of Maryland
Old Dominion University
University of Phoenix
Websitebradleyforarizona.com
Military service
Service/branchUnited States Navy
Years of service1972–1980

Contents

EducationEdit

Bradley earned his BS in psychology from the University of Maryland, his MEd in counseling from Old Dominion University, and his MBA from the University of Phoenix.

ElectionsEdit

  • 2014 Ran against the moderate Republican Mark Morrison. Bradley won and retained his seat as the incumbent
  • 2012 Redistricted to District 10, and with incumbent Republican Senator Linda Gray retiring and leaving the Senate District 10 seat open, and Republican Senator Frank Antenori redistricted from District 30, Bradley was unopposed for the August 28, 2012 Democratic Primary, winning with 18,139 votes,[3] and won the November 6, 2012 General election with 48,509 votes (54.7%) against Senator Antenori.[4]
  • 2000 When House District 9 incumbent Republican Representatives William McGibbon ran for Arizona Senate and Lou-Ann Preble left the Legislature, leaving both seats open, Bradley ran unopposed in the September 12, 2000 Democratic Primary, winning with 6,486 votes,[5] but in the four-way November 7, 2000 General election, lost to Republican nominees Marian McClure and Randy Graf.[6]
  • 2002 Redistricted to District 28, and with incumbent Republican Representatives Carolyn Allen and Wes Marsh both running for Arizona Senate and leaving both seats open, and Republican Representative Edward Poelstra redistricted from District 14, Bradley ran in the five-way September 10, 2002 Democratic Primary, placing second with 5,340 votes;[7] in the November 5, 2002 General election, fellow Democratic nominee Theodore Downing took the first seat and Bradley took the second seat with 22,322 votes ahead of Representative Polestra.[8]
  • 2004 Bradley and Representative Downing were challenged the three-way September 7, 2004 Democratic Primary; Representative Downing placed first and Bradley placed second with 6,250 votes;[9] in the five-way November 2, 2004 General election, Representative Downing took the first seat and Bradley took the second seat with 37,003 votes ahead of Republican nominees Bill Phillips, Richard Dale, and Libertarian candidate Daniel Hickman.[10]
  • 2006 With Democratic Representative Downing running for Arizona Senate and leaving a District 28 seat open, Bradley ran in the four-way September 12, 2006 Democratic Primary, taking second with 8,675 votes;[11] in the three-way November 7, 2006 General election, fellow Democratic nominee Steve Farley took the first seat and Bradley took the second seat with 30,575 votes ahead of Republican nominee Bill Phillips.[12]
  • 2008 Bradley and Representative Farley were unopposed for both the September 2, 2008 Democratic Primary where Bradley placed second with 9,568 votes,[13] and the November 2, 2010 General election, where Representative Farley took the first seat and Bradley took the second seat with 43,845 votes.[14]
  • 2010 Bradley ran for one of the two open seats on the Arizona Corporation Commission in the three-way August 24, 2010 Democratic Primary and placed second with 139,191 votes;[15] fellow Democratic nominee Jorge Luis Garcia died before the November 2, 2010 General election, where Republican Senator Brenda Burns took the first seat and incumbent Republican Commissioner Gary Pierce took the second seat.[16]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "David Bradley". Phoenix, Arizona: Arizona State Legislature. Retrieved January 6, 2014.
  2. ^ "Dave Bradley's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved January 6, 2014.
  3. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2012 Primary Election August 28, 2012" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 5. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 12, 2013. Retrieved January 6, 2014.
  4. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2012 General Election November 6, 2012" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 7. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 12, 2013. Retrieved January 6, 2014.
  5. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2000 Primary Election - September 12, 2000" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 9. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 20, 2013. Retrieved January 6, 2014.
  6. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2000 General Election - November 7, 2000" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 9. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 18, 2013. Retrieved January 6, 2014.
  7. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2002 Primary Election - September 10, 2002" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 13 & 14. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 18, 2013. Retrieved January 6, 2014.
  8. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2002 General Election - November 5, 2002" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 10. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 18, 2013. Retrieved January 6, 2014.
  9. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2004 Primary Election - September 7, 2004" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 11. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 20, 2013. Retrieved January 6, 2014.
  10. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2004 General Election - November 2, 2004" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 10. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 20, 2013. Retrieved January 6, 2014.
  11. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2006 Primary Election - September 12, 2006" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 12. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 20, 2013. Retrieved January 6, 2014.
  12. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2006 General Election - November 7, 2006" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 10. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 28, 2011. Retrieved January 6, 2014.
  13. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2008 Primary Election - September 2, 2008" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 12. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 24, 2009. Retrieved January 6, 2014.
  14. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2008 General Election - November 4, 2008" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 12. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 19, 2008. Retrieved January 6, 2014.
  15. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2010 Primary Election - August 24, 2010" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 17. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 20, 2013. Retrieved January 6, 2014.
  16. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2010 General Election - November 2, 2010" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 10. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 20, 2013. Retrieved January 6, 2014.

External linksEdit