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David Anthony Brading Litt.D, FRHistS, FBA[1][2][3][4] (born 26 August 1936), is a British historian and Professor Emeritus [5] of Mexican History at the University of Cambridge, where he is an Emeritus Fellow of Clare Hall and a Honorary Fellow of Pembroke College. His work has been recognized with several awards,including the Bolton Prize in 1972 [6] the Order of the Aztec Eagle in 2002 from the Mexican government .[2][7][8] and the Medal of Congress from the Peruvian government in 2011.[2][9] Brading has received honorary degrees from several universities, including Universidad del Pacifico, Universidad de Lima[2] and the Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo[10]

David A Brading
Professor David Brading.jpg
Professor David Brading in the courtyard of Condumex, Mexico
Born
David Anthony Brading

(1936-08-26) 26 August 1936 (age 83)
London, England
NationalityBritish
Other namesD.A. Brading
OccupationHistorian, writer
Known forMexican History ,
Church and State
Economic history of Mexico
Spouse(s)
Celia Wu Brading (m. 1966)
ChildrenChristopher James Brading
AwardsBolton Prize (1972)
Order of the Aztec Eagle (2002)
Medalla de Honor del Congreso Peru (2011)
Academic background
Alma materCambridge University (BA, 1960; University College London PhD, 1965)
Academic work
InstitutionsCambridge University
Yale University
University of California, Berkeley
Notable worksMexican Phoenix. Our Lady of Guadalupe: Image and Tradition Across Five Centuries,
The First America: The Spanish Monarchy, Creole Patriotism and the Liberal State 1492–1867

He is regarded as one of the foremost historians of Latin America in the United Kingdom.[11][12][13] and was the most widely cited British Latin Americanist.[14][15]

Early life and educationEdit

David Brading was born in London, England and educated at St Ignatius' College and Pembroke College, Cambridge where he read History and obtained a BA (Hons) Double first-class honours in 1960. He was an Exhibitioner and Foundation Scholar at Cambridge University where he attended the lectures of David Knowles, Geoffrey Elton, and Michael Postan. In 1961 he was awarded a Henry Fellowship to Yale University.But it was later that year, whilst in Mexico, that Brading's fascination with the country began, "I have now found my field of study: sixteenth-century Spain and Latin America"...The more I think of it, the more Latin America seems attractive. Sixteenth–century Spain, looking back to the Reconquista and forward to the Counter Reformation and the decadence. The nature of its Catholicism, its mysticism, the history of its expansion, the Jesuits, its art, architecture and poetry. Latin America with its archaeology and anthropology, the nature of its liberalism and its revolutions.”[11]

After working for several months in the British civil service as Assistant Principal at the Board of Trade, he received his M.A. from Cambridge University[16] and enrolled for a PhD at University College, under the supervision of John Lynch.

Deciding to investigate silver mining in New Spain, Brading spent 15 months engaged in archival research, starting in the Archive of the Indies , Biblioteca Nacional de España and the Archivo Histórico Nacional before continuing in Mexico in the National Library of Mexico, General Archive of the Nation and finally the archive of Guanajuato.[11] The fruition of this research was the completion in 1965 of his doctoral thesis,[2] entitled "Society and Administration in Late Eighteen Century Guanajuato with especial reference to the Silver Mining Industry"[17] which was examined by Charles Boxer and John Parry.

Returning to the United States as Assistant Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, Brading delivered three sets of lectures dealing with Mexico, Peru and Argentina, before moving to Yale University as Associate Professor in 1971.

Brading's first book, Miners and Merchants in Bourbon Mexico 1765–1810 was published in 1971. It dealt with the general history of the silver industry in Mexico with a comprehensive study of Guanajuato and it's mines, population and leading families. A review in the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science called it "landmark of dissertation research and organization"[18] while Fernand Braudel who is considered one of the greatest of the modern historians found it a "fascinating book".[19] It won the Bolton Prize in 1972[6]

In 1973, Brading returned to Cambridge University as a University Lecturer in Latin American History and become Director of the Centre of Latin American Studies at Cambridge University from 1975 – 1990. He was a fellow of St Edmund's College from 1975–1988. In 1991 a LittD was awarded to Brading and he was made Reader in Latin American History at Cambridge University. The following year he was the Leverhulme Research Fellow in Mexico, received an honorary doctorate from the University of Lima in Peru.[2] and was elected membership of the European Academy of Sciences and Arts of which he is one of only ten British members in the humanities, the others being Roger Scruton, Richard Overy , Norman Davies and Timothy Garton Ash among others.[20] In 1999, Brading was made Professor in Latin American History at Cambridge University.

WorksEdit

In 1992, Brading's book The First America: The Spanish Monarchy, Creole Patriots, and the Liberal State, 1492–1867 was published. Its central thesis was that Spaniards born in the New World (creoles) had an American cultural identity, a creole consciousness, distinct from those born and raised in Spain (peninsulares). A review in the journal History declared it to be a book of major importance on the topic,[21] as did a review in the Journal of Latin American Studies.[22] The Mexican literary magazine Letras Libres "said it occupies a place of honor in the library of neophytes and scholars."[23]

In 2001, Brading published Mexican Phoenix, Our Lady of Guadalupe: Image and Tradition across Five Centuries, a detailed history of the most important religious icon in Latin America – the Virgin of Guadalupe. Foreign Affairs magazine commented in a review saying that it was "brilliant"... and having " remarkable insight" [13][23][24]

FestschriftEdit

In 2007 a Festschrift was published in his honour, entitled Mexican Soundings: Essays in Honour of David A. Brading.[25][26][27][28][29] The Hispanic American Historical Review in a review of the book said "Brading's contributions to Mexican history are equaled by few and exceeded by none."[28] while an essay by Eric Van Young praised Brading as the " leading scholar of intellectual history and the Catholic Church for colonial Mexico."[11]

Contributors included Alan Knight , Enrique Florescano, Eric Van Young, Susan Deans-Smith, Ellen Gunnarsdóttir, Brian Hamnett, Marta Eugenia García Ugarte, and Guy P.C. Thomson.

BooksEdit

  • Miners and Merchants in Bourbon Mexico, 1763–1810 (Cambridge University Press, 1971) ISBN 9780521078740
  • Haciendas and Ranchos in the Mexican Bajio: Leon 1700–1863 (Cambridge University Press, 1978) ISBN 9780521222006
  • Prophecy and Myth in Mexican History" (Cambridge University Press, 1984) ISBN 9789681672294
  • The Origins of Mexican Nationalism (Cambridge University Press, 1985) ISBN 0904927474
  • The First America: The Spanish Monarchy, Creole Patriotism and the Liberal State 1492–1867 (Cambridge University Press, 1991) ISBN 9780521391306
  • Church and State in Bourbon Mexico. The Diocese of Michoacan, 1749–1810 (Cambridge University Press, 1994) ISBN 9780521523011
  • Mexican Phoenix. Our Lady of Guadalupe: Image and Tradition Across Five Centuries (Cambridge University Press, 2001) ISBN 9780521801317
  • Octavio Paz y la poética de la historia mexicana (Fondo de Cultura Económica, 2002)
  • Mexican soundings : essays in honour of David A. Brading, Edited by Susan Deans-Smith and Eric Van Young (London : Institute for the Study of the Americas, 2007.) ISBN 9781900039734

Academic achievements, awards, and honorsEdit

In the Spring 1998 newsletter of the Conference on Latin American History published by the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, William McGreevey in a study of the 11 volumes of The Cambridge History of Latin America, bibliographic essays, demonstrated that David Brading was "cited more frequently than that of any other writer on Latin American history".[14]

  • Henry Fellow, Yale University, 1960–1961
  • Herbert Eugene Bolton Prize, 1972
  • Visiting Fellow, University of Tokyo, Japan, 1985
  • Directeur d'Etudes at I'Ecole de Hautes Etudes en Science Sociales, 1989
  • Professor Honorario (Honoris Causa), University of Lima, Peru, 1993
  • Fellow of Academia Scientiarum et Artium Europaea, 1993
  • Leverhulme Research Fellow in Mexico,1993
  • Visiting Scholar, Centro de Estudios de Historia de Mexico, Condumex,1993
  • Member of Academia Scientiarum et Artium Europaea
  • Fellow of Clare Hall, Cambridge University, 1995
  • Fellow of the British Academy 1995
  • Julio Cortázar Visiting Professor, University of Guadalajara, 1996
  • Miembro Honorario, Instituto Riva-Agüero, Escuela de Altos Estudios, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, 1997
  • Miembro Fundador, La Sociedad Mexicana de Bibliofilos, A.C. 1997
  • Miembro Correspondiente, La Academia Nacional de la Historia, Lima, Perú, 1998
  • Andrew W. Mellon Senior Research Fellow, John Carter Brown Library, Brown University, 2000
  • Academico Corresponsal, Academia Mexicana de la Historia, 2008
  • Honorary Fellow of Pembroke College, Cambridge University, 2008

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Contemporary Authors Online (2003). "D. A. Brading". Detroit: Gale. Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Who's Who (UK) (2016). "BRADING, Prof. David Anthony, PhD, LittD; FBA 1995". Oxford: A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 2016; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2015. Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  3. ^ British Academy (2016). "BRADING,David Emeritus Professor of Mexican History, University of Cambridge". London: The British Academy. Retrieved 16 May 2016.[permanent dead link]
  4. ^ Cambridge University (2016). "BRADING,David Emeritus Professor of Mexican History, University of Cambridge". Cambridge: Cambridge University. Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  5. ^ Cambridge University (2016). "Cambridge University Reporter Special No 5 Tuesday 15 December 2015 Vol cxlvi". Cambridge: Cambridge University. Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  6. ^ a b "Bolton-Johnson Prize". Conference on Latin American History. 2016. Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  7. ^ JUAN MANUEL, VENEGAS (12 November 2002). "El Aguila Azteca para Brading" (in Spanish). La Jornada. Desarrollo de Medios S.A. de C.V. Retrieved 18 May 2016. el presidente Fox distinguiera al profesor David Brading con el Aguila Azteca,
  8. ^ Ruiz, José Luis (13 November 2002). "Inauguran muestra prehispánica". El Universal. Retrieved 18 May 2016.
  9. ^ "CONGRESO CONDECORÓ A HISTORIADOR BRADING". Congreso de la República Peru (in Spanish). Congreso de la República Peru. Retrieved 18 May 2016.
  10. ^ "Historia de México, legado de nuestros antepasados que no debe morir". Universia (in Spanish). Universia. 9 June 2005. Retrieved 20 May 2016. Por sus contribuciones a la historia de México, nombran Doctor Honoris Causa a Enrique Florescano, Friedrich Katz y David A. Brading en la Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo
  11. ^ a b c d Deans-Smith, Susan; Young, Eric Van (2007). Mexican soundings : Essays in honour of David A. Brading. London: Institute for the Study of the Americas, University of London. ISBN 978-1900039734. Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  12. ^ Moya, Jose C (2010). The Oxford Handbook of Latin American History. Oxford University Press. p. 43. ISBN 9780195166200.
  13. ^ "by world renowned historian, Professor David Brading FBA". British Academy. Archived from the original on 19 September 2015. Retrieved 16 May 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  14. ^ a b Mcgreevey, William (1998). "Leading Scholars of Latin American History". Conference on Latin American History. University of North Carolina at Charlotte. 34 Spring. Retrieved 19 May 2016.
  15. ^ Craske, Nikki; Lehmann, David (April 2002). "Fifty Years of Research in Latin American Studies in the UK". European Review of Latin American and Caribbean Studies. Celda. No. 72: 61–80. JSTOR 25675968.
  16. ^ "The Cambridge MA: : Student Registry". Cambridge University. Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  17. ^ Brading, David. "Society and administration in late eighteenth century Guanajuato : with especial reference to the silver mining industry". copac.jisc.ac.uk. Retrieved 17 May 2016.
  18. ^ Bernstein, Harry (1972). "Reviewed Work: Miners and Merchants in Bourbon Mexico, 1763–1810 by D. A. Brading". The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. Sage Publications, Inc. 400: 197–198. JSTOR 1039991.
  19. ^ Braudel, Fernand (1979). Civilization and Capitalism, 15th–18th Century: The perspective of the world, Volume 3. Fontana. p. 402. ISBN 9780520081161. Retrieved 19 May 2016. From D.A. Brading's fascinating book on eightteenth-century New Spain
  20. ^ "European Academy of Sciences and Arts Members". European Academy of Sciences and Arts. Retrieved 19 May 2016.
  21. ^ Fisher, John (1992). "Review Reviewed Work: The First America: The Spanish Monarchy, Creole Patriots, and the Liberal State, 1492–1867 by D. A. Brading". History. Wiley. 77 (251): 464–465. JSTOR 24422114.
  22. ^ Carr, Raymond (1992). "Reviewed Work: The First America: The Spanish Monarchy, Creole Patriots, and the Liberal State 1492–1867 by D. A. Brading". Journal of Latin American Studies. 24 (2): 437–439. JSTOR 157074.
  23. ^ a b Domínguez Michael, Christopher. "La Virgen de Guadalupe: imagen y tradición, de David A. Brading". Letras Libres. Retrieved 17 May 2016.
  24. ^ "Mexican Phoenix, Our Lady of Guadalupe: Image and Tradition Across Five Centuries; Images at War:". Foreign Affairs. Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  25. ^ Radding, Cynthia (2008). "Review of Mexican Soundings: Essays in Honour of David A. Brading". Journal of Latin American Studies. 40 (2): 341–343. JSTOR 40056672.
  26. ^ Rankin, Monica A (2009). "Mexican Soundings: Essays in Honour of David A. Brading". Estudios Interdisciplinarios de América Latina y el Caribe. Tel Aviv University. 20 (2). Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  27. ^ Anna, Timothy E (2008). "Mexican Soundings: Essays in Honour of David A. Brading". The Americas. Cambridge University Press. 64 (3): 452–454. JSTOR 30139155.
  28. ^ a b Tutino, J (2009). "Mexican Soundings: Essays in Honour of David A. Brading". Hispanic American Historical Review. Duke University Press. 89 (1): 165–167. doi:10.1215/00182168-2008-059. Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  29. ^ Buve, Raymund (2009). "Mexican Soundings. Essays in Honour of David A. Brading". Iberoamericana. Frankfurt: Iberoamericana Editorial Vervuert. Año 9, No. 35: 285–287. JSTOR 41676953.

External linksEdit