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Daniels Motor Company was a pioneer brass era American automobile company, founded in 1915 by George E. Daniels (formerly of GM AND Buick) with Neff E. Parish.[1]George Daniels was a known lawyer, engineer, and mechanic. He was considered the best motorcar designer in the United States.[2] Neff Parish had his own automobile parts and framing manufacturing company. Neff was the creator of the time's highest-grade heat-treated alloy steel frames, respected in the steel industry.[3] Daniels Motor Company produced 1,500 high quality automobiles between 1916-1924, branding themselves as “the distinguished car with just a little more power than you will ever need”, and “The aristocrat of American cars”.[4]

Daniels Motor Company
Manufacturer
IndustryAutomobile
FateClosed
Founded1915 in Reading, Pennsylvania, United States of America
FounderGeorge E. Daniels and Neff E. Parish
Defunct1924
Headquarters,
United States of America
ProductsDaniels Eight

No stock models were created.[5] Daniels cars were built to be permanent personal pieces of art.[6] Each car fabricated was crafted for the individual buyer.[7] With custom coachwork, the Daniels was a bespoke car, built to order, offering a proprietary narrow-angle V8 as stand V8 as standard equipment, for a price (in 1922) of US$7,450.[8] By contrast, the 1913 Lozier Big Six limousines and landaulettes were US$6,500, tourers and roadsters US$5,000; the Lozier Light Six Metropolitan tourer and runabout started at US$3,250;[9] Americans ran from US$525 down to US$4250;[10] the Enger 40 was US$2000,[11] the FAL US$1750, the Oakland 40 US$1600,[12] and both the Cole 30 US$1500,[13] and Colt Runabout were US$1500.[14] Below that, presumably, a Daniels customer would not have looked.

BeginningEdit

In 1916, Daniels Motor Company produced 300 Model A Daniels Eight Cylinder Speedsters from its Reading, Pennsylvania manufacturing plant.[15] As Daniels did all of its own production, the company never had to refuse buyers due to high demand unlike competitors.[16] In 1917, the three passenger Coupe Model B was produced. Prices ranged from $3,100 to $5,200. In 1919, between one and two hundred Cloverleaf Coupe model Cs were produced.[17] This model displayed the first Daniels built engine. The engine, designed by the same Italian engineer who created the best four cylinder engines in Europe proved inadequate and had to be reconfigured.[18]

1920sEdit

In 1920, Daniels announced it would be opening a new plant in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and premiered the V8 engine.[19] Production was expected to be 1,500 automobiles annually at the new facility. Seven different body styles were available with V8 engines, with designs ranging from the seven-passenger touring cars priced $4,750 to the Daniels limousine at $6,250. In 1921, prices increased and existing models experienced moderate design changes. In 1922, the Daniels Motor Company opened a new office in Brooklyn,[20] New York intended to serve Brooklyn and Long Island residents and announced the plan to double output of all Daniels’ plants within two months’ time.[21] This office was the first Daniels to offer a service station to all Daniels Motor Company buyers with Daniels Motor Company specific tools and equipment. George Daniels cited providing service stations as the most important facet of his business structure, as it was a major driver of sales. In its prime, Daniels Motor Company had between 15 and 20 agents across the US.[22] That same year, Daniels released a statement explaining the company would be cutting prices for the first time. The president warned buyers no further reductions were expected and prices are to rise again within 90 days.[23] At the same time, a majority of the company's preferred stock was offered on the New York Stock Exchange.

Financial CrisisEdit

In 1923, the company underwent “unusual” procedures to take back its declaration of dividends.[24] A series of internal business problems lead to the initial breakdown of the company.[25] A federal judge rejected an offer of $84,271 made for assets of Daniels Motor Company at public auction for the company's Reading plant.[26] The auction was held by the company's receivers of equity under adherence of the US court system. The courts told receivers they could apply later for a re-sale after they have considered two proposals made in court. First, the president asked for two weeks to develop a reorganization plan. Second, one bidder offered to buy the land for $110,000. The second option fell through when the court found the proposal inadequate.[27] In 1924, as a last ditch effort to save the business, the company announced its line of products will begin to be sold at higher prices in order to make a profit. Additionally, it was announced the moving of its company headquarters from Reading to Philadelphia.[28] Later in 1924, anyone holding claims against the “defunct” Daniels Motor Company were notified to present their claims[29] to the Philadelphia court district who has appointed a special master dedicated to passing the final accounts of the corporation.

In a statement from the company:[30]

With a desire to produce the best material available and to obtain products at the lowest prices, a heavy cash investment was made in raw materials. These expenditures have placed the company in the position of not having sufficient cash to conduct its business along the best and most economical lines. With the object of conserving assets, protecting the creditors, serving the public, and to insure a continuation of the company as soon as the present financial situation is straightened out, the company is asking for a temporary receiver in equity.

The corporation was sold by the order of the district court. One hundred people attended the public auction and six bids were made. George Billman, a real estate dealer bought the Reading plant property. The property was estimated to be worth $300,000.[31] George Nagle purchased the name, trademarks, and drawings for $1,900. Levene Motor Company of Philadelphia acquired the assets of Daniels Motor Company. The company paid $90,000, $50,000 subject to mortgage. The company planned to invest $20,000 in improvements to convert the plan to a warehouse and manufacturing facility for their own purposes.

Post OperationEdit

In 1953, a 42-year-old Daniels 1921 model D car was up for auction in California. The original cost was $6,500. It was believed to be the last existing 1921 Daniels Model D in existence, and one of five remaining Daniels cars in the world.[32]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Clymer, Floyd (1950). Treasury of Early American Automobiles, 1877-1925 (2 ed.). United States of America: Bonanza Books. p. 161. ISBN 0873414284. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  2. ^ "Daniels "8" is Much Admired". The Scranton Republican. 114 (27): 14. 1 February 1921. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  3. ^ "Erect Factory in Quaker City". The Los Angeles Times. 39: 12. 8 August 1920. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  4. ^ "The Daniels Automobile & The Daniels Motor Car Co". american-automobiles.com. Farber and Associates, LLC. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  5. ^ "The Daniels Automobile & The Daniels Motor Car Co". american-automobiles.com. Farber and Associates, LLC. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  6. ^ "Underneath the Lustre and Beauty". The New York Times. 71 (23, 279): 10. 19 October 1921. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  7. ^ "Underneath the Lustre and Beauty". The New York Times. 71 (23, 279): 10. 19 October 1921. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  8. ^ Clymer, Floyd (1950). Treasury of Early American Automobiles, 1877-1925 (2 ed.). United States of America: Bonanza Books. p. 161. ISBN 0873414284. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  9. ^ Clymer, Floyd (1950). Treasury of Early American Automobiles, 1877-1925 (2 ed.). United States of America: Bonanza Books. p. 111. ISBN 0873414284. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  10. ^ Clymer, Floyd (1950). Treasury of Early American Automobiles, 1877-1925 (2 ed.). United States of America: Bonanza Books. p. 91. ISBN 0873414284. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  11. ^ Clymer, Floyd (1950). Treasury of Early American Automobiles (2 ed.). United States of America: Bonanza Books. p. 104. ISBN 0873414284. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  12. ^ Clymer, Floyd (1950). Treasury of Early American Automobiles, 1877-1925 (2 ed.). United States of America: Bonanza Books. p. 84. ISBN 0873414284. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  13. ^ Clymer, Floyd (1950). Treasury of Early American Automobiles (2 ed.). United States of America: Bonanza Books. p. 104. ISBN 0873414284. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  14. ^ Clymer, Floyd (1950). Treasury of Early American Automobiles (2 ed.). United States of America: Bonanza Books. p. 63. ISBN 0873414284. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  15. ^ "The Daniels Automobile & The Daniels Motor Car Co". american-automobiles.com. Farber and Associates, LLC. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  16. ^ "Erect Factory in Quaker City". The Los Angeles Times. 39: 12. August 8, 1920. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  17. ^ "The Daniels Automobile & The Daniels Motor Car Co". american-automobiles.com. Farber and Associates, LLC. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  18. ^ "Underneath the Lustre and Beauty". The New York Times. 71 (23, 279): 10. 19 October 1921. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  19. ^ "The Daniels Automobile & The Daniels Motor Car Co". american-automobiles.com. Farber and Associates, LLC. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  20. ^ "Daniels Roadster Emergency Model". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. 82 (188): 4C. 9 July 1922. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  21. ^ "Erect Factory in Quaker City". The Los Angeles Times. 39: 12. 8 August 1920. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  22. ^ "The Daniels Automobile & The Daniels Motor Car Co". american-automobiles.com. Farber and Associates, LLC. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  23. ^ "Price Decline Is Announced". The San Francisco Chronicle. 93 (120): A11. 23 April 1922. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  24. ^ "Days High Spots in Wall Street". The Hartford Daily Courant. 86: 21. 18 January 1923.
  25. ^ "The Daniels Automobile & The Daniels Motor Car Co". american-automobiles.com. Farber and Associates, LLC. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  26. ^ "Sale Offers Rejected". Philadelphia Inquirer. 189 (122): 8. October 30, 1923. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  27. ^ "Sale Offers Rejected". Philadelphia Inquirer. 189 (122): 8. 30 October 1923. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  28. ^ "Daniels Motor Plant Sold by Court Order". Reading Times. 65 (463): 10. 15 January 1924. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  29. ^ "Will Receive Claims Against Daniels Co". The Indianapolis Sunday Star. 21 (348): 2. 18 May 1924. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  30. ^ Brooks, JH (1 February 1923). "Local and Unlisted Securities Market". The Scranton Republican. 122 (28): 15. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  31. ^ "Daniels Motor Plant Sold by Court Order". Reading Times. 65 (463): 10. 15 January 1924. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  32. ^ "42-Year-Old Car at Motor Show". Humboldt Standard. 81 (277): 20. 19 November 1953. Retrieved 23 January 2019.

SourcesEdit

  • Clymer, Floyd. Treasury of Early American Automobiles, 1877-1925. New York: Bonanza Books, 1950.