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Daniel Heath Justice is an Colorado-born Canadian citizen of Cherokee heritage. He is professor of First Nations and Indigenous Studies and English at the University of British Columbia. He started his studies at University of Northern Colorado and received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. He began his career at the University of Toronto, where he taught English and worked in association with the Aboriginal Studies Program.[1]

Daniel Heath Justice
Daniel Justice, Park.jpg
Born
Colorado, United States
ResidenceShíshálh territory on the Sunshine Coast of British Columbia
NationalityCherokee, Canadian, American
EducationUniversity of Northern Colorado, University of Nebraska - Lincoln
OccupationProfessor, writer
Notable work
Our Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History, Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature, Sovereign Erotics: A Collection of Two-Spirit Literature, Why Indigenous Literatures Matter

Justice is the author of Why Indigenous Literatures Matter (2018) (Wilfrid Laurier University Press), Our Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History (2006) (University of Minnesota Press),[2] as well as his Indigenous fantasy trilogy, The Way of Thorn & Thunder - Kynship (2005), Wyrwood (2006), and Dreyd (2007) which was published by Kegedonce Press.[3][4]

Contents

AwardsEdit

In 2015, Justice was awarded the UBC Killam Research Prize[5] in recognition of his leadership in the field of Indigenous Literary Studies and for his many contributions to it, including Our Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History (2006), The Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature (co-edited with James H. Cox, 2014), and Why Indigenous Literature Matters (2018). In 2010, he was awarded the Ludwik and Estelle Jus Memorial Human Rights Prize[6] at the University of Toronto. James Cox of the University of Texas at Austin stated that "Daniel has devoted his life and work to advocating for the civil and human rights of the silences and dispossessed peoples of our world."[7] The University of Toronto added that Justice's "positive and lasting impact is felt directly at the U of T through his one-on-one work with native students, his ability to bring previously inexperienced young people to thinking about social justice and creative activism against oppression and his encouragement of both graduate and undergraduate students to take on community service as part of classes."[8]

BooksEdit

  • Why Indigenous Literatures Matter (2018)
  • Our Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History (2006)
  • Reasoning Together: The Native Critics Collective
  • Sovereign Erotics: A Collection of Two-Spirit Literature
  • The Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature
  • Badger
  • W'daub Awae, Speaking True: A Kegedonce Press Anthology

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Daniel Justice: First Nations and Indigenous Studies". University of British Columbia. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  2. ^ "Daniel Heath Justice. Our Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History". H-Net Reviews. 2006. Retrieved 2012-11-29.
  3. ^ "Daniel Heath Justice (Author of Kynship)". Goodreads. Retrieved 2012-11-29.
  4. ^ Daisy Hernandez (2006-11-15). "Spotlight: Daniel Heath Justice". COLORLINES. Retrieved 2012-11-29.
  5. ^ "Daniel Heath Justice wins UBC Killam Research Prize | Department of English Language & Literatures". english.ubc.ca. Retrieved 2018-03-12.
  6. ^ "University of Toronto - Alumni Award Recipients". awards.alumni.utoronto.ca. Retrieved 2018-03-12.
  7. ^ "University of Toronto - Alumni Award Recipients". awards.alumni.utoronto.ca. Retrieved 2018-03-12.
  8. ^ "University of Toronto - Alumni Award Recipients". awards.alumni.utoronto.ca. Retrieved 2018-03-12.

External linksEdit