Dangerous (Michael Jackson album)

Dangerous is the eighth studio album by American singer Michael Jackson. It was released by Epic Records on November 26, 1991. Co-produced by Jackson, Bill Bottrell, Teddy Riley, and Bruce Swedien, the album was Jackson's first since Off The Wall (1979) to not be produced by longtime collaborator Quincy Jones. Featured appearances include Heavy D, Princess Stéphanie of Monaco, Slash and Wreckx-n-Effect. The album incorporates R&B, pop and new jack swing, a new genre in vogue at the time. Elements of industrial, funk, hip hop, electronic, gospel, classical and rock are also featured. Twelve of the album's fourteen songs were written or co-written by Jackson, discoursing topics like racism, poverty, romance, self-improvement, and the welfare of children and the world.

Dangerous
Original album artwork by Mark Ryden
Original album artwork by Mark Ryden
Studio album by
ReleasedNovember 26, 1991
RecordedJune 25, 1990 – October 30, 1991[1]
Studio
Genre
Length77:03
LabelEpic
Producer
Michael Jackson chronology
The Original Soul of Michael Jackson
(1987)
Dangerous
(1991)
HIStory: Past, Present and Future, Book I
(1995)
Michael Jackson studio album chronology
Bad
(1987)
Dangerous
(1991)
HIStory: Past, Present and Future, Book I
(1995)
Singles from Dangerous
  1. "Black or White"
    Released: November 11, 1991
  2. "Remember the Time"
    Released: January 14, 1992
  3. "In the Closet"
    Released: April 9, 1992
  4. "Jam"
    Released: July 13, 1992
  5. "Who Is It"
    Released: August 31, 1992
  6. "Heal the World"
    Released: November 23, 1992
  7. "Give In to Me"
    Released: February 15, 1993
  8. "Will You Be There"
    Released: June 28, 1993
  9. "Gone Too Soon"
    Released: December 1, 1993

An experimental work, Dangerous is considered an artistic change for Jackson, with his music focusing to more socially conscious material, and a broader range of sounds and styles. It features catchy pop hooks and choruses while also introducing underground sounds to a mainstream audience. The album's tone is noted by critics as gritty and urban, with sounds including synthetic basslines, scratching, and drum machine percussion, as well as unconventional sounds like honking vehicle horns, sliding chains, swinging gates, breaking glass, and clanking metal. Throughout the album Jackson also implements beatboxing, scat singing, and finger snapping.

Dangerous debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 Top Albums chart, as well as in ten other countries, and was the best-selling album worldwide of 1992. Nine singles premiered between November 1991 and December 1993, including two exclusively released outside the United States. The album produced four singles that reached top ten of the Billboard Hot 100: "Remember the Time", "In the Closet", "Will You Be There" and the number-one single "Black or White". The Dangerous World Tour grossed $100 million (equivalent to $177 million in 2019) which made it one of the highest-grossing tours of the 1990s.

Dangerous is one of the best-selling albums of all time having sold over 32 million copies worldwide, and was certified 8× platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) in August 2018. An influence on contemporary pop and R&B artists, it has been included in several publications' lists of the greatest albums. At the 1993 Grammy Awards, it received four Grammy Award nominations, winning Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical, while Jackson was awarded the Grammy Legend Award. Jackson won three American Music Awards at the 1993 American Music Awards, including the inaugural International Artist Award. Jackson was also honored with Billboard Music Awards for Best Worldwide Album, as well as Best Worldwide Single for "Black or White."

BackgroundEdit

After the success of Bad, Jackson wanted more independence and control over the creative process and separated himself from Quincy Jones to avoid the perception that his success was dependent on the long-time producer. Jackson began working on new tracks in 1989 with a handful of members from the B-team of Bad, including Matt Forger and Bill Bottrell.[2] The album was originally conceived as a greatest-hits collection with a handful of new songs similar to Madonna's The Immaculate Collection. The proposed title was Decade. Jackson signed off on the idea in early 1989 and test pressings were made by Epic Records. Jackson received $18 million in advance.[3][4]

Decades was originally scheduled for a late 1989 release date but was delayed several times. Another release date was set for November 1990, but it never materialized. Jackson was preoccupied with on-going changes in his management team while also attempting to realize his film-making ambitions.[5] In June 1990, the artist collapsed while dancing in his home studio due to a possible panic attack, with symptoms of chest pains, dehydration and inflammation of the ribs.[6] Soon after, Decades was dropped entirely, and Jackson determined that his new material constituted a full album, which he called Dangerous.[7]

RecordingEdit

For about a year between 1989 and 1990, recording took place primarily at Record One (a branch of Ocean Way Studios in Sherman Oaks) where Jackson arranged for executive control over the facility for $4,000 per day.[8][9] During this time most work had proceeded with three producers (Bill Bottrell, Bruce Swedien and Bryan Loren) in three distinct studios with Jackson.[10] Bottrell co-wrote and produced "Give In to Me" and "Black or White," while also receiving writing credits for "Dangerous" and production credits for "Who Is It."[11] He was previously forced out of the production of Bad by Quincy Jones, but Jackson brought him back for Dangerous, in which he was known as the "rock guy."[12] Bottrell also introduced classically trained keyboardist Brad Buxer to Jackson. Buxer was originally hired as a technician for his expertise in electronic equipment. A fortuitous relationship grew between Jackson and Buxer, to which Buxer recalled, "Musically speaking, we were on the same wavelength; we spoke the same language."[13] The Jackson-Buxer partnership would continue for twenty years.[14]

For most of the rhythm tracks, Jackson worked with Loren at Westlake Studios. Their work had begun since the end of Jackson's Bad tour, and together they recorded "Work That Body," "She Got It," "Serious Effect," "Do Not Believe It," "Seven Digits," and "Man in Black."[5] Loren wanted to recapture the organic R&B feeling of Jackson's past albums like Off the Wall and Thriller.[15] LL Cool J was invited to rap on "Serious Effect" and "Truth about Youth," because Jackson wanted to add hip-hop to the record. The rapper had been critical of Jackson but changed his tune to praise after their collaboration.[16] Ultimately, however, none of Loren's recordings would make the final cut.[17]

Though Loren's material was strong, it was not up to Jackson's standards, and he was searching a newer type of sound that would be as compelling as Janet Jackson's Rhythm Nation. Jackson discovered new jack swing, a more aggressive and urban sound, after reaching out to Antonio "L.A." Reid and Kenny "Babyface" Edmonds, who were producers of that style of music.[18] In June 1990, Jackson hired Teddy Riley, also known as the "Father of New Jack Swing." By then, Jackson had already recorded over fifty songs.[19] Initially recording at Record One, Riley moved to nearby Larrabee Studios after a few weeks, because other producers were working at the Sherman Oaks Studio.[20] Unlike Loren, Riley wanted Dangerous to sound different from Jackson's earlier work, and Jackson admired Riley for bringing in newer styles. In wanting everything to sound unique, Jackson challenged Riley to create new instrumentals without relying on stock synth and drum machine sounds.[21] Riley rehauled some of Loren's work such as "She Got It" and "Serious Effect." "Jam" and "Dangerous" continued developing with Riley. "Dangerous" was originally recorded with Bottrell, but Jackson was not satisfied until improvements were made.[22] Riley said he brought Jackson's music back to its "barest forms" of R&B and funk.[23]

By spring of 1991, Jackson prepared the track list for the final cut of Dangerous which included several tracks he recorded with Riley: "Remember the Time," "Dangerous," and "In the Closet." For "In the Closet," Jackson had planned a duet with Madonna which did not materialize. Her half of the duet was then changed and replaced with Princess Stéphanie of Monaco.[24] The meeting with Slash took more than a year to coordinate, and the two musicians collaborated on "Black or White" and "Give In to Me."[25] Swedien recalled recording sessions lasting up to 18 hours. On one occasion, he ordered Jackson not to leave the studio until he sang the vocals for "Keep the Faith" all the way through: "This was scary but he did it. He didn't leave the studio until dawn."[26]

Jackson had spent an exorbitant $10 million to record Dangerous.[27] Executives at Epic set a deadline for the album, wanting it released before November 28, 1991, Thanksgiving Day. For the last two months of recording, Jackson and Swedien rented hotel rooms located four minutes from Record One, so they could get back to work as soon as possible. Riley said, "When the deadline came, he [Jackson] wanted to do more and more songs. [...] And then when Michael saw the commercial for Dangerous, the David Lynch thing, we started working hard to get it finished."[9] Dangerous was finally completed and mastered, by Bernie Grundman, on Halloween, 1991.[28]

Jackson recorded roughly 60 to 70 songs for Dangerous, some of which were released later.[9][29] One song that would be singles for his next album HIStory, environmental anthem "Planet Earth" (finalized as "Earth Song") and ended up on the cutting room floor. "Superfly Sister," "Ghosts" and "Blood on the Dance Floor" were released in the remix compilation Blood on the Dance Floor: HIStory in the Mix. Loren helped develop "Superfly Sister," while Riley worked on "Ghosts" and "Blood on the Dance Floor."[30] "For All Time," a romantic pop ballad that Jackson liked but did not feel it fit Dangerous, was released in the 25th anniversary edition of Thriller.[31] "Slave to the Rhythm" was remastered and released for the 2014 compilation album Xscape. Another Riley outtake, "Joy," featured in Blackstreet's 1994 debut album, which Riley produced.[32][33]

Composition and lyricsEdit

Dangerous is a new jack swing, R&B and pop album, which incorporates elements of several other genres, including industrial, funk, hip hop, electronic,[37] gospel, classical, and rock.[38] In a 1992 interview with Ebony magazine, Jackson said, "I wanted to do an album like Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite. So that in a thousand years from now, people would still be listening to it."[39][40]

The album features catchy pop hooks and choruses while also introducing underground sounds to a mainstream audience. The album's tone is noted by critics as gritty and urban, with sounds including synthetic basslines, scratching, and drum machine percussion,[37] as well as unconventional sounds like honking vehicle horns, sliding chains, swinging gates, breaking glass, and clanking metal. Throughout the album Jackson also implements beatboxing, scat singing, and finger snapping. The album is considered an artistic artistic change for Jackson, with his music focusing to more socially conscious material, and a broader range of sounds and styles.[41] With its range of genres and unusual use of sounds featured, the album is also considered experimental.[42]

The album featured Jackson rapping for the first time.[11] The inclusion of Wreckx-n-Effect and hip-hop rhythms were attempts to introduce Jackson to a younger generation of urban listeners.[43] Producer Teddy Riley was a pioneer of new jack swing, and he was hired by Jackson specifically for his work in the genre.[44][45] Riley co-produced half the songs on the album. Bruce Swedien said of Riley, "He’d come in with a groove, we’d say it wasn’t exactly right, and there would be no complaining. He’d just go back and then come back in and blow us away with something like 'Dangerous.'"[9] In recordings with Bill Bottrell, the sounds were more diverse (e.g. "Black or White" and "Give In to Me"). The rap in "Black or White" was written and performed by Bottrell, credited under the pseudonym "L.T.B." Jackson hummed melodies and grooves before leaving the studio, while Bottrell developed on these ideas with drum machines and samplers, including an Akai S1000.[11] Bottrell operated a Neve console and two 24-track Studer analog tape machines to draft ideas and demos. He then used a 32-track Mitsubishi machine to assemble the album.[11]

"[Recording with Jackson] is at once the most sterile and creative process I've been involved in. Everything is pieced together from samples: you use the same drum beat and chords, then later add things to make it different [...]. Michael hires out the studio for like ten years and shows up once a month."[46]

Slash, interview with Musician magazine, 1991.

The lyrics for Dangerous were more varied than those of Jackson's previous records. Opening track "Jam" features a dense, swirling Riley track, propelled by horn samples and a subtle scratch effect, and includes a fleet rap by Heavy D.[47] The ballads, "Keep the Faith" (composed by Jackson, Siedah Garrett and Glen Ballard) and the self-composed "Will You Be There" had sounds of gospel, while "Heal the World" and "Gone Too Soon" were softer pop ballads. "Gone Too Soon," written by Larry Grossman and Buz Kohan, is a tribute to Ryan White following his death due to AIDS in 1990.[48] The album also included songs of other personal nature especially in songs such as "She Drives Me Wild," "Remember the Time," "Can't Let Her Get Away," "Who Is It" and "Give In to Me." The title track's subject is similar to that of "Dirty Diana" with the song focusing on a seductress.[49] Though the artist sang about racial harmony in some of his songs with the Jacksons, "Black or White" was the first song where the lyrics were interpreted with the context of his own changing skin color.[50] In "Why You Wanna Trip on Me," Jackson juxtaposed social ills to his own alleged eccentricities that were covered in the press at the time, asking critics and the tabloid media why they were focusing on the cult of celebrity rather than the multitude of serious problems in the world.[51]

Album artworkEdit

The Dangerous cover was painted by American artist Mark Ryden. It display's Jackson's eyes and a single lock of his hair behind a gold masquerade mask, the face of a chimpanzee (which may be Jackson's pet Bubbles) atop the mask and a dog and a bird wearing royal clothing sitting on the left and right side of the cover respectively. At the entrance of a black path is P. T. Barnum, who was creator of the Barnum and Bailey circus.[52] According to Fraser McAlpine of BBC Music, Ryden depicted Jackson as "a guarded circus artist who has seen glory and the machinery involved in making it happen".[53]

ReleaseEdit

In November 1991, days before the debut of the music video "Black or White," David Browne of Entertainment Weekly commented on the high expectations of Dangerous, due to the extended time spent on developing the album and Jackson's lucrative $65 million contract with Sony Music. The writer stated, "[T]here is more riding on the success of Dangerous than on any other album in pop history."[29] Jackson personally hoped that the album would sell 100 million copies, a number that would twice surpass the sales of Thriller.[9] Five days before the album's release, three men armed with guns robbed 30,000 copies from a Los Angeles warehouse.[54]

Dangerous was released on November 26, 1991. 4 millions were shipped in the United States before the released[55]. The album debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 Top Albums chart. It sold 350,000 copies in its first five days and remained at number one for four weeks.[9][56] By January 1992, the album was certified four-times platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for sales of over four million copies in the United States, roughly the same number as the initial sales of Off the Wall.[57][58] In November 1992, the album reportedly sold 15 million copies worldwide.[59] It dominated global charts, debuting at number one in the U.K. while also reaching number one in seven other territories including Australia, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain.[60] In August 2018, the album was certified eight-times platinum by the RIAA.[57][61] By recent estimates, Dangerous has sold over 32 million copies worldwide making it one of the best-selling albums of all time.[62][63]

PromotionEdit

 
Jackson during a performance of "Will You Be There" at the Dangerous World Tour in 1992

Similar to the way in which record label executives had approached Bad, expectations were set at a high bar for Dangerous.[64] In September 1991, Jackson netted a deal to have his videos air on FOX alongside regular music-video channels MTV, BET and VH1.[65]

The eleven-minute video for "Black or White" debuted on November 14, 1991 and was broadcast across 27 countries. Five hundred million viewers reportedly watched it—the largest audience ever for a music video.[66] The music video and its controversy boosted the sale of Dangerous, as did the broadcast of videos for "Remember the Time" and "In the Closet".[67] The Dangerous: The Short Films collection of music videos from Dangerous, with behind-the-scenes footage, was released in 1993.[68]

Jackson embarked on the Dangerous World Tour to promote Dangerous, which successfully grossed $100 million (equivalent to $177 million in 2020)[69] and drew nearly 4 million people to a total of 72 concerts.[70] All profits from the tour were donated to various charities including Jackson's own Heal the World Foundation. The Bucharest concert was filmed on October 1, 1992, for broadcast on HBO on October 10, 1992. Jackson sold the film rights for the concert for $20 million, then the highest amount for a concert performer to appear on television.[71] The airing of the HBO concert special, Michael Jackson: Live in Bucharest, revived sales of the album.[72]

After several weeks of tapering off again, Jackson made personal appearances in early 1993 including the American Music Awards and Grammy Awards, the latter in which he accepted the Grammy Legend Award from his sister Janet, a widely discussed interview with Oprah Winfrey, his half-time performance at the Super Bowl XXVII which started the NFL's trend of signing top acts to appear during the Super Bowl to attract more viewers and interest, helping to return the album to the top ten.[73][74]

SinglesEdit

The album's leading track, "Black or White", was an instant worldwide hit upon its release in November 1991, reaching the top of the Billboard Hot 100 chart just three weeks after it was released, staying there for seven weeks.[75] It was the fastest chart topper since The Beatles' "Get Back" in 1969 and was also the best-selling single worldwide of 1992.[76][77] "Black or White" reached number one in 20 countries, including the US, the UK, Canada, Mexico, Cuba, Turkey, Zimbabwe, Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the Eurochart Hot 100. In the UK, the single became the first single by an American to chart at number one since "It's Now or Never" by Elvis Presley in 1960.[76] The singles were more successful overseas than in the US. In the UK alone, seven singles reached the top ten. This set a record for any studio album in the UK until Calvin Harris surpassed it in 2013.[78]

"Remember the Time" peaked at number three on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart and number one on the R&B Singles Chart. It reached number one in New Zealand charts for two consecutive weeks.[79] In the United Kingdom, the song charted at number three, where it peaked.[80] It peaked at number four in the Netherlands and Switzerland.[81] The song also charted within the top ten on the French, Australian, Swedish, Italian, and Norwegian charts; peaking at number five, six, eight and ten.[81] It charted in the top 20, peaking at number 16, in Austria.[81] It was generally well received by contemporary music critics and regarded as one of the highlight songs on Dangerous.[82]

The album's third single, "In the Closet" peaked at number six on the Billboard Hot 100, also reached number one on the R&B Singles Chart, becoming the album's third consecutive top 10 hit.[83] In the United Kingdom, the song charted at number eight, where it peaked.[84] The song's female vocal was originally labeled "Mystery Girl" but was later revealed to be Princess Stéphanie of Monaco.[85]

"Jam" only reached number 26 on the Billboard Hot 100, despite heavy promotion.[86] The music video of the song featured NBA icon Michael Jordan. The song was played in the Chicago Bulls' 1992 NBA Championship video Untouchabulls and was used in many promotional NBA ads of that season.[87] In the UK, the single reached the top twenty, where it peaked at number 13.[88] "Heal the World" peaked at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100.[89] The song reached number two in the UK Singles Chart in December 1992, kept off the number one position by Whitney Houston's "I Will Always Love You".[90] In a 2001 Internet chat with fans, Jackson said "Heal the World" was the song he was most proud to have created.[89] "Who Is It" peaked at number 14 on the United States' Billboard Hot 100, while peaking at number six on Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs, as well as topping the Hot Dance Club Play.[91] The song peaked on the United Kingdom music chart at number ten. It remained within the top 100 positions for seven consecutive weeks from July to September 1992.[92] In France, the track peaked at number eight on August 29.[91] "Who Is It" reached its lowest peak position at number 34 in Australia.[93]

"Will You Be There" was the last top-10 single on the Billboard Hot 100 from the album, peaking at number seven.[89] The song peaked at number two in New Zealand and reaching the top ten in Belgium, Canada, Ireland, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.[94][95] It was the theme song of the film Free Willy. Its appearance in the film also helped sales for Dangerous.[96]

The overseas-only single "Give In to Me" reached the top five in the UK,[97] Netherlands and Australia, while hitting the top of the charts in New Zealand. "Gone Too Soon", another overseas single, was more moderately received, charting within the top 40 in the UK.[98] Jackson performed the song at president-elect Bill Clinton's inauguration celebration An American Reunion: The 52nd Presidential Inaugural Gala.[99]

Critical receptionEdit

Professional ratings
Aggregate scores
SourceRating
Album of the Year76/100[108]
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic     [100]
Blender     [101]
Chicago Tribune    [102]
Encyclopedia of Popular Music     [103]
Entertainment WeeklyB−[43]
Los Angeles Times    [104]
Pitchfork8.6/10[105]
Q     [106]
Rolling Stone     [47]
The Village VoiceA−[107]

In a review for Rolling Stone, Alan Light said Jackson was "a man, no longer a man-child, confronting his well-publicized demons and achieving transcendence through performance", on an album that rose to "the impossible challenge set by Thriller during moments when Riley's production dance rhythms "prove a perfect match for Jackson's clipped, breathy uptempo voice".[47]

Robert Christgau of The Village Voice deemed it Jackson's "most consistent album since Off the Wall, a step up from Bad even if its hook craft is invariably secondary and its vocal mannerisms occasionally annoying. "While he felt Jackson was too insistent with the "faith-hope-and-charity" message songs, Christgau applauded the production's "abrasively unpredictable" rhythms and the "sex-and-romance" songs, calling them the most plausible of Jackson's career.[107]

Jon Pareles was less receptive in The New York Times, calling it Jackson's "least confident" solo album yet. He believed Jackson sounded anxious and out of place with Riley's electronic beats while panning the "dogmatically ordinary" lyrics of the love songs, writing that "they seem based on demographic research rather than experience or imagination."[109] Chris Willman, writing for the Los Angeles Times, said, in the album, Jackson wanted to transcend all demographics—race, age, nationality—and be a role model for children and a bad cat at the same time. The album was "mostly good, expertly made fun" but far from Jackson's best work. Willman also criticized "Heal the World" as "goofily embarrassing" and "venturing into the realm of self-parody."[104]

Retrospective appraisalsEdit

An influence on contemporary pop and R&B artists, Dangerous has been ranked by critics and publications as one of the greatest albums of all time. While the sounds on the album polarized critics,[37] some have considered Dangerous as Jackson's artistic peak. Jeff Weiss called it "Jackson’s final classic album and the best full-length of the New Jack Swing era."[110] Critic Joseph Vogel described the album as Jackson's most socially conscious record, most personally revealing—similar to Stevie Wonder's Songs in the Key of Life—and the most groundbreaking record of its era.[111][38] Writing for The Guardian in 2018, the critic said, "Returning to [Dangerous] now, without the hype or biases that accompanied its release in the early 90s, one gets a clearer sense of its significance [...] it surveyed the cultural scene—and the internal anguish of its creator—in compelling ways [...]. The contemporary music scene is certainly far more indebted to Dangerous". Vogel also credited the album as a significant factor to the transformation of black music.[50] Ben Beaumont-Thomas deemed Dangerous as Jackson's career-high album, "the very peak of his powers, with his widest ever emotional range set to production that makes new jack swing seem much more than just lame dance moves and fluorescent man-made fibers."[112] Stephen Thomas Erlewine also praised Jackson's brave approach in the album, that it was "a much sharper, riskier album" than Bad.[100]

Speaking for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Janet Macoska applauded the modernity of Dangerous: "a sleek, contemporary-sounding update of Jackson's music" which featured the "ambitious, heartfelt anthems "Heal The World" and "Will You Be There."[113] Similarly, Odyssey critic James Wesser said, "[Dangerous], in my opinion, is timeless and if it was re-released in the year 2016, it will still sound fresh and new."[114] Michael Roffman of Consequence of Sound described the album as "Jackson's 90s masterpiece."[115] Scholar Susan Fast thought of Dangerous as Jackson's coming-of-age album: “[The album] offers a compelling narrative arc of postmodern angst, love, lust, seduction, betrayal, damnation, and above all else racial politics, in ways heretofore unseen in his music."[116] Meanwhile, Tari Ngangura of Vice magazine described it as one of the "greatest introspective albums of all time."[117] Todd "Stereo" Williams of The Boombox said the album was Jackson's "blackest album" since Off the Wall—a return to his roots. He highlighted the cultural references in the music video "Black or White," the all black cast and black director for "Remember the Time," the casting of black supermodel Naomi Campbell as the love interest in "In the Closet" and working with Teddy Riley who was "R&B's biggest hit-maker" at the time.[118] Williams also considered the album as a significant record of the 90s; it asserted Jackson as a formidable force in popular music amid the rise of grunge and gangsta rap.[118]

RankingsEdit

In 2007, the National Association of Recording Merchandisers (NARM), in conjunction with the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, ranked Dangerous at number 115 on its list of the Definitive 200 Albums of All Time.[119] In Spin's list of The 300 Best Albums of the Past 30 Years (1985-2014), the album was ranked at number 132.[120] Spin writer Chuck Eddy named it one of the essential new jack swing albums in a list published by the magazine.[121] In Colin Larkin's third edition of the All Time Top 1000 Albums (2000), Dangerous was ranked number 325. Additionally, it was ranked number 13 in the list of the Soul/R&B – All Time Top 50 albums.[122] Dangerous was ranked number 43 in Billboard's list of the Greatest of All Time R&B/Hip-Hop Albums, out of 100 albums.[123] In 2019, 24/7 Wall St. ranked it number 89 in its list of the 100 Best Pop Albums of All Time.[124]

AccoladesEdit

Dangerous received four Grammy Award nominations including three for Jackson: Best Pop Vocal Performance for "Black or White," and Best R&B Vocal Performance and Best R&B Song for "Jam." Teddy Riley and Bruce Swedien won Best Engineered Album, Non Classical, while Jackson received the Grammy Legend Award in the same ceremony.[125][126] Jackson won two awards and received five nominations total at the 1993 American Music Awards. Dangerous won Favorite Pop/Rock Album, and "Remember the Time" won Favorite Soul/R&B Song. The inaugural International Artist Award also went to Jackson.[127]

Jackson won Best R&B/Soul Album of the Year – Male and Best R&B/Soul Single – Male for "Remember the Time" at the 1993 Soul Train Music Awards. He also won the special Humanitarian Award.[128] At the 1993 NAACP Image Awards, "Black or White" won Outstanding Music Video, and Jackson won the Entertainer of the Year Award.[129][130] At the 1994 MTV Movie Awards, "Will You Be There" won Best Song From a Movie.[131] The 1992 Billboard Music Awards awarded Jackson Best Worldwide Album for the album and Best Worldwide Single for "Black or White." Both were special awards.[77]

Award Date of Ceremony Category Recipient(s) Result Ref.
American Music Awards January 25, 1993 Favorite Pop/Rock Male Artist Michael Jackson Nominated [127]
Favorite Pop/Rock Album Dangerous Won
Favorite Soul/R&B Male Artist Michael Jackson Nominated
Favorite Soul/R&B Album Dangerous Nominated
Favorite Soul/R&B Song "Remember the Time" Won
Grammy Awards February 24, 1993 Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male "Black or White" — Michael Jackson Nominated [132]
Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male "Jam" — Michael Jackson Nominated
Best Rhythm & Blues Song "Jam" — Michael Jackson, René Moore, Teddy Riley, Bruce Swedien Nominated
Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical Teddy Riley, Bruce Swedien Won
Soul Train Music Awards March 9, 1993 Best R&B/Soul Album of the Year – Male Dangerous Won [128]
Best R&B/Soul Single – Male "Remember the Time" Won
Best R&B Music Video "Remember the Time" Nominated

Track listingEdit

Standard edition disc[133]

No.TitleWriter(s)Producer(s)Length
1."Jam"
  • Jackson
  • Riley
  • Swedien
5:39
2."Why You Wanna Trip on Me"
  • Jackson
  • Riley
5:24
3."In the Closet"
  • Jackson
  • Riley
  • Jackson
  • Riley
6:32
4."She Drives Me Wild"
  • Jackson
  • Riley
3:42
5."Remember the Time"
  • Jackson
  • Riley
  • Belle
  • Jackson
  • Riley
4:01
6."Can't Let Her Get Away"
  • Jackson
  • Riley
  • Jackson
  • Riley
4:59
7."Heal the World"
  • Jackson
  • Jackson
  • Swedien
6:25
8."Black or White"
  • Jackson
  • Bottrell
4:16
9."Who Is It"Jackson
  • Jackson
  • Bottrell
6:35
10."Give In to Me"
  • Jackson
  • Bottrell
  • Jackson
  • Bottrell
5:30
11."Will You Be There"
  • Jackson
  • Jackson
  • Swedien
7:41
12."Keep the Faith"
  • Jackson
  • Swedien
5:57
13."Gone Too Soon"
  • Jackson
  • Swedien
3:22
14."Dangerous"
  • Jackson
  • Bottrell
  • Riley
  • Jackson
  • Riley
6:57
Total length:77:03

PersonnelEdit

Personnel as listed in the album's liner notes.[134]

  • John Bahler – vocal and choir arrangements (track 7)
  • The John Bahler Singers – choir (track 7)
  • Glen Ballard – arrangements (track 12)
  • John Barnes – keyboards (track 8)
  • Michael Boddicker – synthesizer (tracks 1, 7, 11–13), sequencer (8), keyboards and programming (9)
  • Bill Bottrell – producer, engineer, and mixing (tracks 8–10); guitar (8, 10); drums (9, 10); percussion, rap, and intro voice-over (8); synthesizer (9); bass guitar and mellotron (10)
  • Craig Brock – assistant guitar engineer (track 10)
  • Brad Buxer – keyboards (tracks 1, 7–9, 11), synthesizer (1, 14), percussion (8), programming (9)
  • Larry Corbett – cello (track 9)
  • Andraé Crouch – choir arrangements (tracks 11, 12)
  • Sandra Crouch – choir arrangements (tracks 11, 12)
  • The Andraé Crouch Singers – choir (tracks 11, 12)
  • Heavy D – rap (track 1)
  • George Del Barrio – string arrangements (track 9)
  • Matt Forger – engineer and mixing (track 7), engineering and sound design (8 intro)
  • Kevin Gilbert – speed sequencer (track 8)
  • Endre Granat – concertmaster (track 9)
  • Linda Harmon – soprano voice (track 9)
  • Jerry Hey – arrangements (track 12)
  • Jean-Marie Horvat – engineer (track 14)
  • Michael Jackson – producer and lead vocals (all tracks), background vocals (1–12, 14), arrangements (1, 9), vocal arrangements (1, 3–7, 11, 14), rhythm arrangements (7, 11), director (8 intro), soprano voice (9)
  • Paul Jackson Jr. – guitar (track 2)
  • Terry Jackson – bass guitar (track 8)
  • Louis Johnson – bass guitar (track 9)
  • Abraham Laboriel – bass guitar (track 13)
  • Christa Larson – ending solo vocal (track 7)
  • Rhett Lawrence – synthesizer (tracks 1, 11, 12, 14); drums, percussion, and arrangements (12); synthesizer programming (11)
  • Bryan Loren – drums (track 8, 9), synthesizer (8)
  • Johnny Mandel – orchestral arrangements and conductor (track 11)
  • Jasun Martz – keyboards (track 8)
  • Andres McKenzie – intro voice-over (track 8)
  • Jim Mitchell – guitar engineer (track 10)
  • René Moore – arrangements and keyboards (track 1)
  • David Paich – keyboards (tracks 7, 9, 13), synthesizer (7, 13), keyboard arrangements and programming (9), rhythm arrangements (13)
  • Marty Paich – orchestral arrangements and conductor (tracks 7, 13)
  • Greg Phillinganes – keyboards (track 11)
  • Tim Pierce – heavy metal guitar (track 8)
  • Jeff Porcaro – drums (track 7)
  • Steve Porcaro – synthesizer (tracks 7, 13), keyboards and programming (9)
  • Teddy Riley – producer, engineer, mixing, and synthesizers (tracks 1–6, 14); keyboards (1–6); guitar (1, 2); rhythm arrangements (2–6, 14); synthesizer arrangements (3–6, 14); drums and arrangements (1)
  • Thom Russo – engineer (track 14)
  • Slash – special guitar performance (track 8 intro, track 10)
  • Bruce Swedien – producer (tracks 1), co-producer (tracks 7, 11–13), engineer and mixing (1–7, 11–14), arrangements and keyboards (1), drums (1, 11, 12), percussion (11, 12)
  • Jai Winding – keyboards and programming (track 9), piano and bass guitar (12)
  • Mystery Girl (Princess Stéphanie of Monaco) – vocals (track 3)

ChartsEdit

CertificationsEdit

Region Certification Certified units/sales
Australia (ARIA)[160] 10× Platinum 700,000^
Austria (IFPI Austria)[161] 4× Platinum 200,000*
Brazil (Pro-Música Brasil)[163] Gold 350,000[162]
Canada (Music Canada)[164] 6× Platinum 600,000^
Chile (IFPI)[165] 5× Platinum 125,000
Czech Republic[166] Gold 1,500
Finland (Musiikkituottajat)[167] Platinum 61,896[167]
France (SNEP)[168] Diamond 2,084,200[169]
Germany (BVMI)[170] 4× Platinum 2,000,000^
Indonesia 500,000[171]
Israel[172] Platinum 40,000
Italy 650,000[173]
Japan (RIAJ)[174] 2× Platinum 400,000^
Malaysia (RIM)[175] 7× Platinum 175,000
Mexico (AMPROFON)[176] 2× Platinum+Gold 600,000^
Netherlands (NVPI)[177] 3× Platinum 300,000^
Portugal (AFP)[178] 2× Platinum 80,000^
Spain (PROMUSICAE)[179] 6× Platinum 600,000^
Sweden (GLF)[180] 3× Platinum 300,000^
Switzerland (IFPI Switzerland)[181] 5× Platinum 250,000^
Thailand 300,000[182]
United Kingdom (BPI)[184] 6× Platinum 2,010,069[183]
United States (RIAA)[185] 8× Platinum 8,000,000^
Summaries
Europe (IFPI)[186] 5× Platinum 5,000,000*

*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

FootnotesEdit

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Works citedEdit