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Dana Jacobson (born November 5, 1971) is a host and correspondent for CBS News currently serving as a co host for CBS This Morning Saturday. She is also an anchor & reporter for CBS Sports and CBS SportsNetwork. She joined CBS News in 2015, 2 years after she began working for CBS SportsNetwork. Prior to that Jacobson spent a decade at ESPN, from 2002 until 2012. In March 2005, she was named co-host of Cold Pizza and transitioned with the show as it became ESPN First Take. On December 30, 2011, she left First Take and returned to anchoring SportsCenter. On March 27, 2012, USA Today announced that Jacobson would leave ESPN when her contract expires at the end of April. Monday, April 30, 2012, was her final day at ESPN when she anchored the 6–8 p.m. ET SportsCenter.

Dana Jacobson
Dana Jacobson Jan 2019.jpg
Jacobson in 2019
Born (1971-11-05) November 5, 1971 (age 47)
Alma materUniversity of Michigan (B.A.)
Career
ShowCBS This Morning
Station(s)CBS
ShowWe Need to Talk
Station(s)CBS Sports Network
Time slotVarious
CountryUnited States
Previous show(s)Cold Pizza
ESPN First Take

On July 13, 2018, Jacobson, along with long-time CBS correspondent Michelle Miller, were named the new co-hosts of the Saturday edition of CBS This Morning.[1]

On CBS morning show on October 11, 2018, host Gayle King announced that Jacobson was engaged. According to 98.5 radio in Boston (The Sports Hub), Jacobson is engaged to Boston Celtics' play-by-play announcer, Sean Grande.

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Early life and careerEdit

Jacobson was born and raised in the suburbs of Detroit, Michigan, in a Jewish family[2] and attended Andover High School in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Subsequently, she attended and graduated from Valley High School in West Des Moines, Iowa, in 1989. Jacobson graduated from the University of Michigan in 1993[2] with a Bachelor of Arts in english and communications and was a member of the Pi Beta Phi sorority.

  • Her first television job was in Traverse City, Michigan, at WPBN/WTOM-TV, where she spent two years as a fill-in news anchor and weekend sports anchor, producer, and editor.
  • Reported on a number of stories in Northern California, including profiles of one time Sacramento Kings players Mike Bibby, Chris Webber, and Jason Williams.
  • Covered a wide range of professional sports including the NFL and NBA as a weekend sports anchor at KXTV-TV, ABC’s Sacramento affiliate station (1998-02).
  • Hosted KXTV’s News10 Red Zone
  • Served as a sports reporter for KXTV's Monday Night Football show (1996–98).
  • Hosted The NBA Insiders, a weekly two-hour radio show for KHTK-AM (2000–02).
  • Filled in for Dan Patrick on his radio show broadcast on ESPN Radio weekdays from 1pm - 4pm Eastern time, during the 2005 holiday season.
  • Filled in occasionally for Mike Golic on the ESPN Radio show Mike and Mike in the Morning.
  • Now works for CBS Sports and CBS Sports Network. She's a regular contributor on the NFL Today, and host on CBS's We Need To Talk.
  • In October 2018 she will be honored by the Michigan Jewish Sports Foundation as one of their Hall of Fame inductees.[3]

ControversyEdit

At a private roast for co-workers Mike Greenberg and Mike Golic in January 2008, Jacobson allegedly cursed the University of Notre Dame and Touchdown Jesus.[4][5] Jacobson and ESPN both released a statement apologizing to those offended by the roast comments.[6] Jacobson was suspended from ESPN for one week. Upon returning, she apologized on-air for her behavior and comments.

AwardsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Steinberg, Brian (July 13, 2018). "'CBS This Morning' Adds Michelle Miller, Dana Jacobson to Saturday Lineup". variety.com. Retrieved July 21, 2018.
  2. ^ a b Jewish Women's Archive: "Dana Jacobson" retrieved March 12, 2017
  3. ^ "Hall of Fame Induction Dinner – Michigan Jewish Sports". www.michiganjewishsports.org. Retrieved 2018-08-10.
  4. ^ Betts, Kyle (February 22, 2008). "Open your eyes people: ESPN is not the real authority on sports". Daily Illini. Archived from the original on December 8, 2008. Retrieved 2009-04-24. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  5. ^ Parks, Bob (January 23, 2008). "ESPN: A Classic Do-As-I-Say, Not-As-I-Do". Canada Free Press. Retrieved 2009-04-24.
  6. ^ http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/print?id=3240230&type=story

External linksEdit