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Daniel Glenn Doornink (born February 1, 1956) is a former professional American football running back in the National Football League who played one season for the New York Giants and seven for the Seattle Seahawks.[1]

Dan Doornink
No. 35, 33
Position:Running back
Personal information
Born: (1956-02-01) February 1, 1956 (age 63)
Yakima, Washington
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
High school:Wapato (WA)
College:Washington State
NFL Draft:1978 / Round: 7 / Pick: 174
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Born in Yakima, Washington, Doornink graduated from Wapato High School in 1974 and played college football at Washington State University in Pullman. He was selected in the seventh round of the 1978 NFL Draft by the Giants, then was traded to the Seahawks in August 1979 for a draft choice.[2][3]

Seahawks fans gave him the nicknames of "Dr. Dan" for his medical career, and "Mr. Third Down" for his knack of frequently picking up a first down for the team on third down when given the ball via run or pass. He ran for 123 yards on 27 carries for the Seahawks in a wild-card playoff win in 1984 over the Los Angeles Raiders on December 22 in the Kingdome in Seattle. After a series of injuries in 1985, Doornink was released by the Seahawks in August 1986.[4][5]

A physician, Doornink earned his M.D. at the University of Washington in Seattle and practices internal medicine in Yakima. He and his wife, Sharon, have four children, Heidi, Danielle, Tyler, and Grace. Prior to the Seahawks 2007 preseason game on August 25 against the Minnesota Vikings at Qwest Field in Seattle, he raised the 12th Man flag.


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Wickwire, Bob (12 January 2015). "Chat Rewind: Former Seahawks running back Dan Doornink". The Seattle Times. Retrieved 2 February 2016.
  2. ^ "Ax falls hard on NFL stars". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). Associated Press. August 22, 1979. p. 19.
  3. ^ Brown, Butch (October 13, 1979). "Seahawks can move ball". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). p. 13.
  4. ^ "Doornink and Simpson cut". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). Associated Press. August 19, 1986. p. B1.
  5. ^ "The Seattle Seahawks Monday released fullback Dan Doornink". UPI. (archives). August 18, 1986. Retrieved October 24, 2018.

External linksEdit