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Damour (Arabic: الدامور‎) is a Lebanese Christian town that is 20 km (12 mi) south of Beirut. The name of the town is derived from the name of the Phoenician god Damoros who symbolized immortality (ديمومة in Arabic). Damour also remained the capital of Mount Lebanon for three Centuries.

Damour

الدامور
City
Map showing the location of Damour within Lebanon
Map showing the location of Damour within Lebanon
Damour
Location within Lebanon
Coordinates: 33°44′N 35°27′E / 33.733°N 35.450°E / 33.733; 35.450Coordinates: 33°44′N 35°27′E / 33.733°N 35.450°E / 33.733; 35.450
Country Lebanon
GovernorateMount Lebanon Governorate
DistrictChouf District
Area
 • Total10.1 km2 (3.9 sq mi)
Highest elevation
200 m (700 ft)
Lowest elevation
0 m (0 ft)
Population
 • Total10,000
 • Density990/km2 (2,600/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+2 (EET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+3 (EEST)
Dialing code+961
Websitehttp://www.damour-lb.com/

GeographyEdit

The city is located in one of the few flat areas of the Lebanese coast. It is built to the north of the river, the ancient Tamyrus,[1] which bears its name on a dune overlooking the Mediterranean. It is surrounded by plantations of bananas and vegetable crops.[2] It has an area of 10.1 km2 (3.9 sq mi). The Beirut-Tyre Highway separates the plantations. Now dismantled, the track is a stopover.

ClimateEdit

Damour has a mild mediterranean climate (Köppen climate classification: Csa).

Climate data for Damour
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 16.7
(62.1)
17.2
(63.0)
19.3
(66.7)
22.4
(72.3)
25.7
(78.3)
28.4
(83.1)
30.0
(86.0)
30.5
(86.9)
29.5
(85.1)
27.2
(81.0)
23.0
(73.4)
18.9
(66.0)
24.1
(75.3)
Daily mean °C (°F) 13.2
(55.8)
13.5
(56.3)
15.2
(59.4)
17.9
(64.2)
21.2
(70.2)
24.0
(75.2)
25.9
(78.6)
26.8
(80.2)
25.5
(77.9)
23.0
(73.4)
18.9
(66.0)
14.3
(57.7)
20.0
(67.9)
Average low °C (°F) 9.8
(49.6)
9.8
(49.6)
11.3
(52.3)
13.4
(56.1)
16.7
(62.1)
19.7
(67.5)
21.9
(71.4)
22.7
(72.9)
21.5
(70.7)
18.8
(65.8)
14.8
(58.6)
11.7
(53.1)
16.0
(60.8)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 200
(7.9)
150
(5.9)
108
(4.3)
50
(2.0)
17
(0.7)
1
(0.0)
0
(0)
1
(0.0)
6
(0.2)
38
(1.5)
102
(4.0)
161
(6.3)
834
(32.8)
Source: Climate-Data.org[3]

ChurchesEdit

Now, there exist 6 churches in Damour, of which Notre-Dame de Damour and St Élias are the biggest. We also find three other chapels, including Sainte Thècle, St Michel, which was the first church in Damour, St Maroun under reconstruction and St Joseph. These 6 churches are all Maronite Churches. Before the Lebanese Civil War, Damour had another Catholic Church, Savior's Church.

TourismEdit

Because Damour is one of the few cities of the Lebanese coast having a sand beach, and since it is ten minutes from Beirut, Damour attracts tourists and especially water sports enthusiasts. Thus several restaurants, coffees and snacks are located along the beach. There are also a few restaurants at the edges of the Damour river.

HistoryEdit

Emir Fakhreddine the Great had a great interest in Damour.

 
Commemorative plate for the seizure of Damour by the Australians in 1941, installed in Nahr al-Kalb to the north of Beirut.

In the 19th century, Damour was the a flourishing center of the Chouf region. Its plain was then planted with mulberry and had twelve large manufacturing companies. Ten thousand workers and technicians worked in the natural silk industry. The city has a real fascination for the Lebanese worker and attracts the largest majority of the natives in the Sahel region.

During the last centuries, Damour was located on the central axis of fighting and successive wars.

In 1302, after the mamelouks took Arwad Island, on 8 June the same year, the Cypriots landed on the Damour River. A battle took place between the Emir Fakhr al - Din Abdel - Hamid bin Jamaluddin Altnokhi, his brother the Emir Shams al - Din Abdullah accompanied by an army of Muslims against the Cypriot. The battle was won by Crusaders. Fakhr Din Emir was killed, while his brother Shams al - Din fell hostage. He was released after five days for a ransom of three thousand dinars tyriens.

In May 1860, Druze forces committed a massacre of the people.

During the nights of the first world war, inhabitants met the armoured French cruiser Jeanne d'Arc sailors and received medicines, food and other needed supplies.

In 1941, Damour was the French administrative capital. The city being a strategic crossing point on the road to Beirut, 21 July 1941, was the place of one of the battles that affected Lebanon during World War II Syria-Lebanon Campaign. Australian troops, progressing towards the North along the coast, took Damour, held by the French Foreign Legion, faithful to the Vichy Government. A cease-fire was concluded at the end of the battle. There were no more obstacles in the direction of Beirut.

In 1942, South African army engineers built a railway line from Haifa to Beirut along the coast and Australian engineers continued the line to Tripoli. <Orpen N & Martin H J. Salute the Sappers, part 1. 1981 Johannesburg. ISBN 0 620 05376 3> The line is no longer in use.

On January 9, 1976, Palestinians laid siege to the city. On January 20, 1976, thousands of Palestinians committed a massacre of the inhabitants. See Damour Massacre.

During Israeli invasion of 1982, the Israeli air force bombed the city which was under the control of the Palestinian militias.

During the Israeli conflict of 2006, the Israeli air force destroyed several bridges on Highway Beirut-Tyre and on the Damour River.

The Historical BridgeEdit

The history of the archeological bridge dates back to the era of prince-Béchir Shehab who had a great interest in it, it was considered a strategic and important transit point between Mt Lebanon and the South.

NeighbourhoodsEdit

  • Mar Thecla El Naame
  • Mar Mikhael Al Damour
  • Khiyam Al Damour
  • Saadiyat
  • Ghandouriyeh
  • Missiar

Notable people and familiesEdit

  • Elie Saab
  • Said Akl
  • Nassib Al Matni (journalist killed 1958)
  • Michel Aoun
  • Georges Akl
  • Rose Ghurayeb - renown Lebanese author and literary critic
  • Michel Farid Ghrayeb
  • Georges Asaad Aoun
  • Aziz Al Matni (Journalist/writer)
  • Marwan Al Matni (journalist)
  • Said Ghorayeb (Journalist/Television Presenter)
  • Michel Azzi (Television Presenter)
  • Michel Azzi (Singer)
  • Nadine Saab (Singer)
  • Joseph Hashem - Zaghloul al-Damour (Zajal Poet)
  • Geryes Boustani (Zajal Poet)
  • Mario Aoun (Minister)
  • Dani Fadel (Scientific Researcher)
  • Robert ghorayeb (journalist)
  • Camil Azzi (legend)
  • The town has many families that are difficult to enumerate. The largest and most notable ones are: Andraos, Aoun, Chaaya, El Hashem, Azzi, Ghrayeb, Al-Matni, Abou Abdallah, Akl, Fadel, Abou Faysal, Bou Faysal, Bou Abdallah, and Bou Merhi.[who?]

See alsoEdit

FADEL Said Akl , Nassib Al Matni

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Travels in Palestine and Syria, Volume 1, page 286 By George Robinson
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2011-11-05.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ "Climate: Damour". November 2011.

BibliographyEdit

External linksEdit