Daishōyama Naoki

Daishōyama Naoki (born 7 July 1966 as Naoki Yamazaki) is a former sumo wrestler from Anamizu, Ishikawa, Japan. A former amateur champion, he made his professional debut in January 1989 and reached a highest rank of maegashira 2 before retiring in 1995. He is now the head coach of Oitekaze stable.

Daishōyama Naoki
Daishoyama 09 Sep.JPG
Personal information
BornNaoki Yamazaki
(1966-07-07) 7 July 1966 (age 53)
Anamizu, Ishikawa, Japan
Height1.82 m (5 ft 11 12 in)
Weight179 kg (395 lb; 28.2 st)
Career
StableTatsunami
UniversityNihon University
Record266-252-40
DebutJanuary, 1989
Highest rankMaegashira 2 (January, 1991)
RetiredNovember 1995
Elder nameOitekaze
Championships1 (Jūryō)
2 (Makushita)
Special PrizesFighting Spirit (1)
Gold Stars3
Hokutoumi (2)
Ōnokuni
* Up to date as of March 2009.

CareerEdit

Born in Anamizu, Hosu District, as an amateur he won eleven sumo titles, including collegiate and amateur yokozuna, while studying at Nihon University.[1] He also served as captain of the school sumo team. He was recruited by the former sekiwake Annenyama of the Tatsunami stable. Yamazaki had stayed at the heya while taking part in junior high school competitions (as did Daishōhō), and he had also met the former Tatsunami stable wrestler Wakanami as an infant, being held in his arms for a photograph (as top rikishi are often requested to do for luck).[1] As an amateur champion he was given makushita tsukedashi status and made his debut in the third highest makushita division. His first tournament was in January 1989 and after two consecutive yūshō with perfect 7-0 records in January and March 1990 he was promoted to the second highest jūryō division, becoming the first sekitori from Tatsunami stable since the abrupt departure of yokozuna Futahaguro in 1987. He changed his shikona or fighting name from his own surname to Daishōyama at this point.

Daishōyama made his debut in the top makuuchi division in September 1990, and made a kachi-koshi winning score along with three other makuuchi debutants, Akebono, Wakahanada and Takatoriki. This marked the first time that four wrestlers making their top division debuts at the same time had all come through with winning records.[1] In January 1991 he reached what was to be his highest rank of maegashira 2 and earned his first kinboshi for defeating yokozuna Hokutoumi. He was to repeat this upset in July 1991 and also defeated yokozuna Ōnokuni in that tournament. In January 1993 he had slipped to maegashira 14 in the banzuke rankings but responded with his best ever top division score, winning twelve bouts, defeating Konishiki and Takahanada amongst others and finishing runner-up to Akebono, who was promoted to yokozuna after the tournament. Daishōyama was rewarded with what was to be his only sanshō award, for Fighting Spirit.

Daishōyama had had longstanding hip problems since his professional debut,[1] and after missing two tournaments in 1994 through injury he fell back to the jūryō division. After being forced to sit out the September 1995 tournament as well he was demoted to the makushita division and retired from sumo in November without competing in any more bouts.

Retirement from sumoEdit

Having fought in 33 tournaments as a sekitori, Daishōyama was qualified to become a toshiyori, or elder of the Japan Sumo Association, and he purchased the Oitekaze name. In May 1998 he branched out from Tatsunami stable, where he had been working as a coach, and opened up his own Oitekaze stable. His first top division wrestler was Hayateumi in 2000 and he was followed by Hamanishiki in 2001. Both are former Nihon University competitors. He also recruited the Georgian wrestler Kokkai who reached makuuchi in 2004. More recent Nihon University recruits include the popular Endō in 2013 and Daishōmaru in 2014, both of whom have reached the top division. He produced another top division wrestler Daieishō in 2015, who has a non-collegiate background.

Career recordEdit

Daishōyama Naoki[2]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1989 Makushita tsukedashi #60
6–1
 
East Makushita #32
4–3
 
East Makushita #23
5–2
 
West Makushita #11
4–3
 
West Makushita #8
1–6
 
West Makushita #30
4–1–2
 
1990 East Makushita #24
7–0
Champion

 
East Makushita #4
7–0
Champion

 
West Jūryō #11
12–3
Champion

 
West Jūryō #2
11–4
 
East Maegashira #12
8–7
 
West Maegashira #8
9–6
 
1991 West Maegashira #2
5–10
West Maegashira #8
8–7
 
East Maegashira #4
8–7
 
East Maegashira #2
5–10
East Maegashira #9
8–7
 
East Maegashira #7
9–6
 
1992 West Maegashira #2
5–10
 
East Maegashira #8
9–6
 
East Maegashira #3
6–9
 
East Maegashira #6
8–7
 
West Maegashira #2
5–10
 
West Maegashira #8
5–10
 
1993 West Maegashira #14
12–3
F
East Maegashira #3
3–12
 
East Maegashira #12
9–6
 
East Maegashira #6
5–10
 
West Maegashira #12
8–7
 
East Maegashira #10
6–9
 
1994 East Maegashira #15
9–6
 
West Maegashira #10
3–11–1
 
East Jūryō #4
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
East Jūryō #4
5–10
 
West Jūryō #9
9–6
 
West Jūryō #4
7–8
 
1995 West Jūryō #6
6–9
 
East Jūryō #11
9–6
 
West Jūryō #7
7–8
 
West Jūryō #8
9–6
 
East Jūryō #4
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
West Makushita #3
Retired
0–0–7
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Sharnoff, Lora (1993). Grand Sumo. Weatherhill. p. 212. ISBN 0-8348-0283-X.
  2. ^ "Daishōyama Naoki Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 18 September 2012.

External linksEdit