Daishōhō Kiyohiro

Daishōhō Kiyohiro (大翔鵬 清洋) (born August 28, 1994 as Shijirbayar Chimidregzen) is a Mongolian sumo wrestler. He began his professional sumo career in 2013 at the age of eighteen. His highest rank to date has been maegashira 9. He wrestles for the Oitekaze stable.

Daishōhō Kiyohiro
大翔鵬 清洋
Personal information
BornShijirbayar Chimidregzen
(1994-08-28) August 28, 1994 (age 25)
Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
Height1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Weight178 kg (392 lb; 28 st 0 lb)
Career
StableOitekaze
Current ranksee below
DebutJanuary, 2013
Highest rankMaegashira 9 (July, 2019)
Championships1 (Jonidan)
* Up to date as of Dec 24, 2019.

Early life and educationEdit

Chimidregzen spent his childhood in Ulaanbaatar and was a good student, but was sent to Japan to study after his fourth grade year, with his mother wishing for him to get a better education.[1] While at this new school he discovered sumo and started wrestling. After showing an aptitude for sumo, by junior high school he was asked by fellow Mongolian rikishi Sensho to join Shikihide stable but chose to stay in school. In high school he was introduced to Oitekaze Oyakata who then took him into Oitekaze stable. His shikona of Daishōhō was derived from his stablemaser, with the kanji coming from yokozuna Taihō and Hakuhō.[2]

CareerEdit

Chimidregzen entered sumo in the January 2013 tournament.[3] He started strong with a 6-1 in jonokuchi and winning the jonidan division the following tournament with a perfect 7-0 record.[3] He made steady progress until he reached the makushita remaining there for 16 basho before gaining sekitori status by being promoted to the jūryō division after the September 2016 tournament.[3] He told reporters when his promotion was announced that he looked up to yokozuna Kakuryū as a role model, and that he simply hoped to get a kachi-koshi or winning record in his jūryō debut.[2] However, in the event Daishōhō fell short of that with a 5-10 record in November 2016, and he was immediately demoted back to makushita. [3] After a year in makushita, he earned promotion back to jūryō for the January 2018 tournament.[3] He was able to remain in the division this time, recording six straight winning records to rise to Jūryō 1 by January 2019.[3] He secured another 8–7 record in January, and won promotion to the top makuuchi division for the first time at the rank of maegashira 16. He became the 25th Mongolian to be promoted to makuuchi, and alongside Tomokaze and Terutsuyoshi it marked the first time since May 2013 that three wrestlers had made their top division debuts simultaneously.[4]

In the March 2019 tournament in Osaka Daishoho fell just short of a winning record with seven wins against eight losses.[5] However he remained in the top division at the same rank when the banzuke was released for the May 2019 tournament. In this tournament he secured his first winning record in the top division of 9–6, and was promoted to his highest rank to date of maegashira 9 for the July 2019 tournament. He lost to Enhō on the final day to fall to a 6–9 record in July,[6] and a disappointing 5–10 score in September saw him fall to maegashira 15 for the November tournament.

Fighting styleEdit

Daishōhō is a yotsu-sumo wrestler, preferring grappling techniques to pushing and thrusting. His most common winning kimarite is a straightforward yori kiri, or force out, and he uses a migi-yotsu grip on the mawashi or belt, with his right hand inside and left hand outside his opponent's arms.[7]

Career recordEdit

Daishoho Kiyohiro[3]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
2013 (Maezumo) (Maezumo) West Jonokuchi #5
6–1
 
East Jonidan #26
7–0
Champion

 
West Sandanme #33
2–5
 
East Sandanme #58
6–1
 
2014 East Sandanme #5
5–2
 
West Makushita #44
5–2
 
West Makushita #31
4–3
 
West Makushita #24
4–3
 
West Makushita #18
3–4
 
West Makushita #23
4–3
 
2015 East Makushita #18
5–2
 
West Makushita #10
3–4
 
East Makushita #18
5–2
 
East Makushita #9
5–2
 
West Makushita #4
4–3
 
West Makushita #2
3–4
 
2016 West Makushita #5
4–3
 
East Makushita #3
3–4
 
West Makushita #7
4–3
 
East Makushita #4
4–3
 
West Makushita #1
5–2
 
East Jūryō #12
5–10
 
2017 East Makushita #4
3–4
 
West Makushita #7
5–2
 
East Makushita #4
3–4
 
West Makushita #7
4–3
 
East Makushita #5
5–2
 
East Makushita #3
5–2
 
2018 West Jūryō #13
9–6
 
West Jūryō #9
9–6
 
West Jūryō #6
8–7
 
East Jūryō #5
8–7
 
East Jūryō #3
8–7
 
East Jūryō #2
8–7
 
2019 West Jūryō #1
8–7
 
East Maegashira #16
7–8
 
East Maegashira #16
9–6
 
West Maegashira #9
6–9
 
West Maegashira #12
5–10
 
West Maegashira #15
3–12
 
2020 West Jūryō #5

 
x x x x x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "大翔鵬が新十両昇進「自分の中で見本」鶴竜が目標" (in Japanese). Nikkan Sports. 28 September 2016. Retrieved 11 January 2019.
  2. ^ a b "大翔鵬「長かった。まず十両で勝ち越したい」" (in Japanese). Nikkan Sports. 28 September 2016. Retrieved 11 January 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "Daishoho Kiyohiro Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 11 January 2019.
  4. ^ "Wrestlers prepare for crucial battles in Osaka". Japan Times. 25 February 2019. Retrieved 9 May 2019.
  5. ^ "Rikishi Profile: Daishoho Kiyohiro". Japan Sumo Association. Archived from the original on 26 March 2019. Retrieved 26 March 2019.
  6. ^ "Kakuryu beats fellow yokozuna Hakuho on final day to clinch sixth title". Japan Times. 21 July 2019. Retrieved 19 November 2019.
  7. ^ "Rikishi Profile - Daishoho Kiyohiro". Japan Sumo Association. Retrieved 11 January 2019.

External linksEdit