Cycling at the 1984 Summer Olympics – Men's track time trial

The men's track time trial cycling event at the 1984 Summer Olympics took place on 30 July and was one of eight cycling events at the 1984 Olympics.[1] There were 25 competitors from 25 nations, with each nation limited to one cyclist.[2] Two other cyclists entered but did not start. The event was won by Fredy Schmidtke of West Germany, the nation's first victory in the men's track time trial and the third consecutive Games in which a German cyclist won (with East Germany victorious in 1976 and 1980). Curt Harnett earned Canada's first medal in the event with his silver, while France returned to the podium for the first time since 1968 with Fabrice Colas's bronze.

Men's track time trial
at the Games of the XXIII Olympiad
Stamps of Germany (Berlin) 1984, MiNr 717.jpg
German stamp commemorating 1984 Olympic cycling
VenueOlympic Velodrome, Los Angeles
Date30 July
Competitors25 from 25 nations
Winning time1:06.10
Medalists
1st place, gold medalist(s) Fredy Schmidtke
 West Germany
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Curt Harnett
 Canada
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Fabrice Colas
 France
← 1980
1988 →

BackgroundEdit

This was the 14th appearance of the event, which had previously been held in 1896 and every Games since 1928. It would be held every Games until being dropped from the programme after 2004. The returning cyclists from 1980 were bronze medalist David Weller of Jamaica and sixth-place finisher Heinz Isler of Switzerland. The Soviet-led boycott kept out defending Olympic champion Lothar Thoms of East Germany and reigning world champion Sergey Kopylov of the Soviet Union. The favorite among those competing was 1982 world champion Fredy Schmidtke.[2]

The Cayman Islands and Chinese Taipei each made their debut in the men's track time trial. France and Great Britain each made their 14th appearance, having competed at every appearance of the event.

Competition formatEdit

The event was a time trial on the track, with each cyclist competing separately to attempt to achieve the fastest time. Each cyclist raced one kilometre from a standing start.[2][3]

RecordsEdit

The following were the world and Olympic records prior to the competition.

World record   Lothar Thoms (FRA) 1:02.955 Moscow, Soviet Union 22 July 1980
Olympic record   Lothar Thoms (GDR) 1:02.955 Moscow, Soviet Union 22 July 1980

No new world or Olympic records were set during the competition.

ScheduleEdit

All times are Pacific Daylight Time (UTC-7)

Date Time Round
Monday, 30 July 1984 12:00 Final

ResultsEdit

Rank Cyclist Nation Lap 1 Lap 2 Time
  Fredy Schmidtke   West Germany 23.67 44.00 1:06.10
  Curt Harnett   Canada 23.78 44.02 1:06.44
  Fabrice Colas   France 24.10 44.11 1:06.65
4 Gene Samuel   Trinidad and Tobago 23.82 44.03 1:06.69
5 Craig Adair   New Zealand 24.82 45.19 1:06.96
6 David Weller   Jamaica 24.17 44.48 1:07.24
7 Marcelo Alexandre   Argentina 24.44 44.96 1:07.29
8 Rory O'Reilly   United States 24.07 44.45 1:07.39
9 Stefano Baudino   Italy 23.79 44.67 1:07.70
10 Heinz Isler   Switzerland 24.08 44.99 1:07.88
11 Rolf Morgan Hansen   Norway 24.42 45.30 1:07.94
12 Marcelo Greuel   Brazil 24.00 45.14 1:08.37
13 Tsutomu Sakamoto   Japan 24.31 45.52 1:08.87
14 Max Rainsford   Australia 25.36 46.28 1:08.96
15 Claus Rasmussen   Denmark 25.15 46.22 1:09.04
16 Max Leiva   Guatemala 25.15 46.41 1:09.36
17 Miguel Droguett   Chile 25.40 46.76 1:09.42
18 Mark Barry   Great Britain 24.10 45.92 1:09.54
19 Charles Pile   Barbados 25.13 46.51 1:10.56
20 Rosman Alwi   Malaysia 25.39 47.64 1:11.03
21 Paul Popp   Austria 26.05 47.61 1:11.10
22 Lee Fu-hsiang   Chinese Taipei 24.89 46.32 1:11.12
23 Rodolfo Guaves   Philippines 26.30 48.36 1:11.61
24 Ernest Moodie   Cayman Islands 26.97 50.06 1:16.91
Leon Richardson   Antigua and Barbuda DNF
Gonzalez Carlos Garcia   Uruguay DNS
Muharud Mukasa   Uganda DNS

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Cycling at the 1984 Summer Games: Men's 1,000 metres Time Trial". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 18 April 2020. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  2. ^ a b c "1,000 metres Time Trial, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  3. ^ Official Report, vol. 2, p. 376.