Cycling at the 1952 Summer Olympics – Men's track time trial

The men's track time trial at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, Finland was held on July 31, 1952. There were 27 participants from 27 nations, with each nation limited to one competitor.[1] The event was won by Russell Mockridge of Australia, the nation's first victory in the men's track time trial since 1932 and second overall (tying France for most of any nation). Marino Morettini's silver was Italy's first medal in the event; Raymond Robinson's bronze was South Africa's. France's three-Games podium streak ended.

Men's track time trial
at the Games of the XV Olympiad
Russell Mockridge and Hubert Opperman 1948.jpg
Russell Mockridge (1948)
VenueHelsinki Velodrome
DateJuly 31
Competitors27 from 27 nations
Winning time1:11.1 OR
Medalists
1st place, gold medalist(s) Russell Mockridge
 Australia
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Marino Morettini
 Italy
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Raymond Robinson
 South Africa
← 1948
1956 →

BackgroundEdit

This was the sixth appearance of the event, which had previously been held in 1896 and every Games since 1928. It would be held every Games until being dropped from the programme after 2004. The only returning cyclist from 1948 was tenth-place finisher Onni Kasslin of Finland. Russell Mockridge of Australia had competed in the road race in 1948; he had won the sprint and time trial at the 1950 British Empire Games and taken second place in the 1951 sprint world championship. Marino Morettini was the amateur world record holder.[2]

Czechoslovakia, Guatemala, Jamaica, Japan, Romania, and the Soviet Union each made their debut in the men's track time trial. France and Great Britain each made their sixth appearance, having competed at every appearance of the event.

Competition formatEdit

The event was a time trial on the track, with each cyclist competing separately to attempt to achieve the fastest time. Each cyclist raced one kilometre from a standing start.[2][3]

RecordsEdit

The following were the world and Olympic records prior to the competition.

World record   Marino Morettini (ITA) 1:10.6 Milan, Italy 18 October 1950
Olympic record   Arie van Vliet (NED) 1:12.0 Berlin, Germany 1 August 1936

Russell Mockridge broke the Olympic record. Nobody else was able to surpass the old time.

ScheduleEdit

All times are Eastern European Summer Time (UTC+3)

Date Time Round
Thursday, 31 July 1952 11:00 Final

ResultsEdit

Kato was the first to ride. Robinson was sixth, and was the first to surpass the 1948 winner's time; Robinson led for much of the competition. Mockridge was 20th, finally surpassing Robinson with a new Olympic record. Morettini went 26th, unable to beat Mockridge but dropping Robinson to third place.[4]

Rank Cyclist Nation Time Notes
  Russell Mockridge   Australia 1:11.1 OR
  Marino Morettini   Italy 1:12.7
  Raymond Robinson   South Africa 1:13.0
4 Clodomiro Cortoni   Argentina 1:13.2
5 Donald McKellow   Great Britain 1:13.3
6 Ib Vagn Hansen   Denmark 1:14.4
7 Ion Ioniţă   Romania 1:14.4
8 Jan Hijzelendoorn   Netherlands 1:14.5
9 Henri Andrieux   France 1:14.7
10 Joseph De Bakker   Belgium 1:14.7
11 Malcolm Simpson   New Zealand 1:15.1
12 Ladislav Fouček   Czechoslovakia 1:15.2
13 Lev Tsipursky   Soviet Union 1:15.2
14 Onni Kasslin   Finland 1:15.3
15 Fredy Arber   Switzerland 1:15.4
16 Andoni Ituarte   Venezuela 1:15.4
17 Hernán Masanés   Chile 1:15.9
18 István Lang   Hungary 1:16.9
19 Luis Angel de los Santos   Uruguay 1:17.0
20 Kenneth Farnum   Jamaica 1:17.2
21 Kurt Nemetz   Austria 1:17.5
22 Frederick Henry   Canada 1:17.6
23 Frank Brilando   United States 1:17.8
24 Gustavo Martínez   Guatemala 1:18.9
25 Imtiaz Bhatti   Pakistan 1:21.2
26 Tadashi Kato   Japan 1:23.2
27 Suprovat Chakravarty   India 1:26.0

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Cycling: Men's 1000 m time trial". sports-reference.com. Archived from the original on 2020-04-18. Retrieved 2012-12-29.
  2. ^ a b "1,000 metres Time Trial, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 10 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ Official Report, p. 546.
  4. ^ Official Report, p. 540.

External linksEdit