Cumbia refers to a number of musical rhythm and folk dance traditions of Latin America, generally involving musical and cultural elements from Amerindians, Africans enslaved during colonial times and Europeans. Examples include:

  • Colombian cumbia, is a musical rhythm and traditional folk dance from Colombia.[1] It has contents of three cultural aspects, indigenous, blacks and to a lesser extent, Spanish, being the result of the long and intense miscegenation between these cultures during the Conquest and the Colony.
  • Panamanian cumbia, a Panamanian folk dance and musical genre, developed by blacks enslaved during colonial times and later syncretized with Amerindian and European cultural elements.

Regional adaptations of Colombian cumbiaEdit

ArgentinaEdit

BoliviaEdit

ChileEdit

Costa RicaEdit

MexicoEdit

ParaguayEdit

  • Cachaca, a fusion of cumbia sonidera, norteña, vallenato and cumbia villera

PeruEdit

  • Peruvian cumbia;
  • Chicha or Andean tropical music
  • Amazonian cumbia or jungle cumbia, a popular subgenre of Peruvian cumbia, created in the Peruvian Amazon
  • Cumbia piurana, a set of styles and sub-genres linked to cumbia that have been produced in Piura, a region on the north Peruvian coast, since the mid-1960s
  • Cumbia sanjuanera, a subgenre of cumbia piurana
  • Cumbia sureña, a subgenre of Peruvian cumbia, a fusion of Andean cumbia and techno

El SalvadorEdit

VenezuelaEdit

ReferencesEdit