Cuatro Caminos metro station (Naucalpan)

Cuatro Caminos (translated from Spanish the name literally means "Four Roads") is a station of the Mexico City metro network.[2][3] Colloquially known as "Metro Toreo",[4][5] it is the current north terminus of Line 2 and serves as a hub for regional transport from and into the State of Mexico.[2][6] In 2019, the station had an average ridership of 114,947 passengers per day, making it the third busiest station in the network.[7]

Metro Cuatro Caminos pictogram.svg Cuatro Caminos
STC rapid transit
Andenes de la estación Cuatro Caminos del Metro de la Ciudad de México - panoramio.jpg
View of the platforms
General information
Other namesToreo
LocationNaucalpan, State of Mexico
Mexico
Coordinates19°27′35″N 99°12′57″W / 19.459592°N 99.215899°W / 19.459592; -99.215899Coordinates: 19°27′35″N 99°12′57″W / 19.459592°N 99.215899°W / 19.459592; -99.215899
Operated bySistema de Transporte Colectivo (STC)
Line(s)Mexico City Metro Line 2 (Cuatro Caminos - Tasqueña)
Platforms2 island platforms
Tracks3
Construction
Structure typeUnderground
Disabled accessYes
Other information
StatusIn service
History
Opened22 August 1984
Passengers
202115,156,149[1]Decrease 32.91%
Rank6/195[1]
Services
Preceding station Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Following station
Terminus Line 2 Panteones
toward Tasqueña
Location
Cuatro Caminos is located in Mexico City
Cuatro Caminos
Metro Cuatro Caminos pictogram.svg Cuatro Caminos
Location within Greater Mexico City
Area map

As of 14 September 1970 Line 2 originally terminated at Metro Tacuba, but on 22 August 1984 the line was extended an additional two stations to reach the municipality of Naucalpan.[6] The station sits on the dividing line between the Mexico City and the neighboring State of Mexico and as such was the first station of the network to be built outside the limits of the Federal District.

General informationEdit

The station logo is a large geodesic dome depicting the former nearby Toreo de Cuatro Caminos bull fighting ring, which the station takes its name from,[2] however the bullring was torn down in 2008.[8] The station's surroundings (popularly known as the paradero), are the main public transport hub to Toluca and northwestern municipalities in the State of Mexico, such as Naucalpan, Atizapán, Tlalnepantla or Huixquilucan, as well as a major connection point to several destinations within the Mexico City proper and it also serves as the housing of a large street market, which is known largely because of its poor general conditions.[9] Officially, no private vehicles are allowed in the area.

Upon leaving the station, there are two main corridors, labeled "North" and "South". North corridor (denoted by the exits A to K), is mainly used for transportation to State of Mexico, while the "South" corridor is mainly aimed at passengers going to the city (denoted by exit letters J to Z), though this is not strictly the case.

The South corridor (if walked) leads to the Anillo Periférico, the Pericentro shopping mall, and many military facilities, while the North corridor leads to the industrial complex of Naucalpan.

In 2003, the Mexican popular music group Café Tacuba produced an album with the title "Cuatro Caminos" in homage to this part of the city.[10]

ExitsEdit

  • South: Avenida Ingenieros Militares, Colonia Argentina Poniente
  • North: Avenida 16 de septiembre, Colonia Transmisiones

RidershipEdit

Annual passenger ridership
Year Ridership Average daily Rank % change Ref.
2021 15,156,149 41,523 6/195 −32.91% [1]
2020 22,591,021 61,724 3/195 −42.63% [11]
2019 39,378,128 107,885 2/195 −1.28% [12]
2018 39,886,917 109,279 3/195 +1.33% [13]
2017 39,364,914 107,849 3/195 +1.03% [14]
2016 38,962,862 106,455 3/195 −3.61% [15]
2015 40,423,144 110,748 2/195 −3.54% [16]
2014 41,904,523 114,806 2/195 −9.01% [17]
2013 46,056,083 126,181 1/195 +7.27% [18]
2012 42,933,161 117,303 1/195 −5.10% [19]
2011 45,242,105 123,950 1/175 +1.84% [20]
2010 44,425,920 121,714 1/175 [21]

GalleryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Afluencia de estación por línea 2021" [Station traffic per line 2021] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2020. Archived from the original on 7 March 2022. Retrieved 7 March 2022.
  2. ^ a b c "Cuatro Caminos" (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 27 September 2011. Retrieved 16 August 2011.
  3. ^ Archambault, Richard. "Cuatro Caminos » Mexico City Metro System". Retrieved 16 August 2011.
  4. ^ Tomasini, Carlos (14 June 2017). "Estaciones del Metro con nombres de lugares que ya no existen". Chilango (in Spanish). Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  5. ^ "Se inunda estación del Metro Toreo". Milenio (in Spanish). 26 May 2014. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  6. ^ a b Monroy, Marco. Schwandl, Robert (ed.). "Opening Dates for Mexico City's Subway". Retrieved 15 August 2011.
  7. ^ "Estaciones de mayor afluencia 2019" (in Spanish). Metro CDMX. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  8. ^ Chávez, Silvia (6 September 2008). "Inicia demolición del Toreo de Cuatro Caminos". La Jornada. Retrieved 19 August 2011.
  9. ^ "Califican de 'bomba de tiempo' al paradero de Cuatro Caminos". Retrieved October 18, 2010.
  10. ^ Jurek, Thom. "Cuatro Caminos - Café Tacuba". AllMusic. Retrieved 19 August 2011.
  11. ^ "Afluencia de estación por línea 2020" [Station traffic per line 2020] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2021. Archived from the original on 21 June 2021. Retrieved 21 June 2021.
  12. ^ "Afluencia de estación por línea 2019" [Station traffic per line 2019] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2020. Archived from the original on 8 April 2020. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  13. ^ "Afluencia de estación por línea 2018" [Station traffic per line 2018] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2019. Archived from the original on 6 June 2019. Retrieved 7 April 2020.
  14. ^ "Afluencia de estación por línea 2017" [Station traffic per line 2017] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2019. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  15. ^ "Afluencia de estación por línea 2016" [Station traffic per line 2016] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2017. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  16. ^ "Afluencia de estación por línea 2015" [Station traffic per line 2015] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2016. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  17. ^ "Afluencia de estación por línea 2014" [Station traffic per line 2014] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2015. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  18. ^ "Afluencia de estación por línea 2013" [Station traffic per line 2013] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2014. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  19. ^ "Afluencia de estación por línea 2012" [Station traffic per line 2012] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2013. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  20. ^ "Afluencia de estación por línea 2011" [Station traffic per line 2011] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2012. Archived from the original on 6 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  21. ^ "Afluencia de estación por línea 2010" [Station traffic per line 2010] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2011. Archived from the original on 6 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.

External linksEdit