Craddock Massif

Craddock Massif is a mountain massif in the Sentinel Range of the Ellsworth Mountains, in the Chilean claim of West Antarctica.

Craddock Massif
Highest point
Elevation4,477 m (14,688 ft) [1]
Coordinates78°36′S 85°18′W / 78.600°S 85.300°W / -78.600; -85.300Coordinates: 78°36′S 85°18′W / 78.600°S 85.300°W / -78.600; -85.300
Geography
LocationWest Antarctica (Chilean claim)
Parent rangeSentinel Range
Climbing
First ascentJed Brown (US) December 2006
Easiest routesnow/ice climb
Sentinel Range with Craddock Massif, USGS Map

Location and highest pointEdit

Craddock Massif is located at the southeastern side of Vinson Massif, between Hammer Col and Karnare Col linking it to Vinson Massif and the southern Sentinel Range respectively. The highest point of Craddock Massif is Mount Rutford, a sharp peak that rises to 4,477 metres (14,688 ft). The Craddock Massif also includes (from north to south) Bugueño Pinnacle, Rada Peak and Mount Craddock.[1]

Discovery and namingEdit

Sentinel Range was first sighted and photographed from the air on November 23, 1935, by Lincoln Ellsworth. The entire range, including Craddock Massif, was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from aerial photography taken by the U.S. Navy, 1958–61.[1]

This massif was originally named "Mount Craddock" by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) in 1965, but subsequent maps limited the name to the massif's southernmost peak, a modification that was adopted by US-ACAN in 2006 when it approved the name Craddock Massif. The massif is named after Professor J. Campbell Craddock (1930–2006), the leader of the 1962–63 University of Minnesota geological expedition to the Sentinel and Heritage Ranges of the Ellsworth Mountains.[1]

MapsEdit

  • Vinson Massif. Scale 1:250 000 topographic map. Reston, Virginia: US Geological Survey, 1988.
  • D. Gildea and C. Rada. Vinson Massif and the Sentinel Range. Scale 1:50 000 topographic map. Omega Foundation, 2007.
  • Antarctic Digital Database (ADD). Scale 1:250000 topographic map of Antarctica. Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR). Since 1993, regularly updated.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Craddock Massif". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 31 May 2010.

External linksEdit

  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document: "Craddock Massif". (content from the Geographic Names Information System)