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Count Your Blessings (Bring Me the Horizon album)

Count Your Blessings is the debut studio album by the English rock band Bring Me the Horizon. Recorded at DEP International Studios in Birmingham with producer Dan Sprigg, it was originally released in the United Kingdom on 30 October 2006 by Visible Noise. The album was later issued by Earache Records in the United States on 14 August 2007. Count Your Blessings was supported by the release of music videos for two of the album's tracks: "Pray for Plagues" on 4 June 2007 and "For Stevie Wonder's Eyes Only (Braille)" on 6 March 2008.

Count Your Blessings
BMTH Count Your Blessings.png
Studio album by
Released30 October 2006 (2006-10-30)
Studio
Genre
Length36:19
Label
Producer
  • Dan Sprigg
  • Bring Me the Horizon
Bring Me the Horizon chronology
This Is What the Edge of Your Seat Was Made For
(2004)
Count Your Blessings
(2006)
Suicide Season
(2008)

Named after a lyric in the album's opening song "Pray for Plagues", Count Your Blessings is representative of the band's early deathcore sound, which was phased out on later releases and eventually abandoned in favour of other, less aggressive styles. The band members were young when they recorded the album, and both the band and its fans have largely disregarded it later in their career as inferior to their later material; it began as early as 2008, when guitarist Lee Malia was already criticising the album's quality. Most of the songs on the record quickly faded from the band's live setlists. Most band members recorded their parts individually, rather than the group doing so as a whole, with the central location of the studio blamed for distracting the young musicians. The album received some negative reviews, with the main complaints revolving around musical originality, although it still reached number 93 of the UK Albums Chart.

Contents

Writing and recordingEdit

Following the release of their first extended play This Is What the Edge of Your Seat Was Made For in October 2004, Bring Me the Horizon toured extensively while writing new material for their full-length debut album.[1] Due to the number of shows the band were playing at the time, much of the material was written quickly before recording was due to begin – drummer Matt Nicholls claimed that three songs were written in the space of two days due to the upcoming deadline.[2] A number of songs are re-recordings of early demos that the band had taped for a project titled The Bedroom Sessions and in a broadcast session for the UK station Radio 1, namely "(I Used to Make Out With) Medusa", "Off the Heezay" and "Liquor & Love Lost" (then known as "Dragon Slaying").[3]

Recording took place at DEP International Studios in Birmingham with producer Dan Sprigg, who had previously worked with bands including Cradle of Filth, Napalm Death and, more recently, Lostprophets. Frontman Oliver Sykes described the recording process as "an intense experience" due to the group's desire to make the best debut album they could, with biographer Ben Welch claiming that they "were starting to feel the pressure of all of the hype that was building around them" at the time.[1] Due to the studio's location in the centre of the city, the young band members (all under 20 years old at the time) were often distracted and would not spend a lot of time in the studio; this meant that each individual member ended up recording the majority of their contributions to the album alone, rather than the full unit performing together.[4]

Background and compositionEdit

When recording Count Your Blessings, Bring Me the Horizon intended to make an album which sounded "as heavy and brutal as they possibly could"; Welch claims that the band scrapped any song ideas that "didn't fit that criterion".[1] Speaking in 2014 about the band's intentions when writing and recording music during their early years, Sykes claimed the group "just wanted to make noisy music".[5] Similarly, when asked about the band's beginnings in a 2014 interview, guitarist Lee Malia explained, "When you're young, you just want to do everything to extremes. That's what the first EP and the album were like: too over-excited sounding".[6] Matt Nicholls said that on Count Your Blessings, Bring Me the Horizon "were influenced a lot by Swedish metal – At The Gates and stuff like that."[7] Nicholls also said that on Count Your Blessings, Bring Me the Horizon's members "were 18 or 19 years old and wanted to be as metal as possible."[7] Specifically, the band's members were influenced by Norma Jean, Skycamefalling, Metallica, Pantera, At the Gates, Arch Enemy, The Dillinger Escape Plan, and In Flames at the band's beginning.[8]

The musical style of Count Your Blessings is most often categorised as deathcore,[9][10][11][12] but has also been labeled more generally as metalcore.[9][13] In addition to metalcore, Count Your Blessings uses elements of genres like melodic death metal, death metal and black metal,[9][13] drawing comparisons to bands like The Black Dahlia Murder,[14] Cannibal Corpse,[10] At the Gates,[15] and Obituary.[16] Last Rites compared the album's vocals (which consist of death growls and high-pitched shrieks) to black metal and the album's guitar playing to Gothenburg melodic death metal.[13] According to Drowned in Sound columnist Raziq Rauf, the songs on the album "generally consist of The Black Dahlia Murder-style thunderous riffs mixed with some dastardly sludgy doom moments and more breakdowns than your dad's old Nissan Sunny".[14] The lyrical content is admittedly simple, which according to Sykes is due to the fact that his life had "never been that bad" at the time he wrote them; the singer has noted that most songs on the album are "about girls or just growing up", which he claims contributes to the group's brand of "party music".[14]

Promotion and releaseEdit

Count Your Blessings was originally released in the United Kingdom on 30 October 2006 by Visible Noise.[1] It was not released in the United States until 14 August 2007, when it was issued by Earache Records.[17] The version released by retailer Hot Topic featured a cover version of Slipknot's "Eyeless" as a bonus track,[18] which had originally been recorded for Higher Voltage: Another Brief History of Rock, a CD released for free with an issue of Kerrang! magazine in June 2007.[19] A first music video for "Pray for Plagues", was directed by Kenny Lindström and released on 4 June 2007.[20][21] A second music video, directed by Perrone Salvatore, "For Stevie Wonder's Eyes Only (Braille)" was issued on 6 March 2008.[22]

Following the release of Count Your Blessings, Bring Me the Horizon toured extensively in support of the album. Throughout October and November the group toured the UK with American black metal band Abigail Williams,[23] although the Phoenix, Arizona-based band left the tour early on after drummer Zach Gibson suffered a wrist injury.[24] Centurion replaced Abigail Williams for the remainder of the tour, and Bring Me the Horizon spent the rest of the year supporting labelmates Lostprophets.[25] The band later replaced Bury Your Dead supporting Killswitch Engage on their European tour in January 2007,[26] then continued to tour the UK through March and April.[27] During the summer, the band played a number of festivals (including Download Festival).[28]

ReceptionEdit

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
About.com     [9]
AllMusic     [29]
Chronicles of Chaos8.5/10[16]
Exclaim!Favourable[10]
MetalSucks     [11]

Upon its release, Count Your Blessings debuted at number 93 on the UK Albums Chart.[30] It also peaked at number 9 on the UK Rock & Metal Albums Chart[31] and remained there for two further weeks, first dropping to number 14[32] and then to number 26.[33]

Most of the media response to Count Your Blessings was mixed to negative. Exclaim! writer Bill Whish wrote positively about the release, praising the "vitriolic lyrics and brutally heavy guitar work" and welcoming the band as "a little more interesting" than some other metalcore artists.[10] DIY magazine's Tom Connick dubbed "(I Used to Make Out With) Medusa" the "crowning jewel" of Count Your Blessings in a 2014 feature, claiming that it "Perfectly [captures] that youthful, drunken recklessness that defined [the band's] most controversial years" with its "razor sharp" guitar work and "thunderous breakdowns".[34] Aaron McKay, a writer for Chronicles of Chaos, praised Sykes' vocal delivery, likening it to Obituary frontman John Tardy.[16]

However, many commentators criticised the lack of invention on the album. While AllMusic's Stewart Mason praised the album for being "vaguely interesting musically" as well as claiming that there is "a greater sense of dynamic than usual" in the genre on the release, he also commented on the "generally unimaginative songwriting", claiming it adds "little to the existing knowledge base" of the genre. Furthermore, he also criticised Sykes's vocal style on the record, which he described as an "immediately irritating" and a "high-pitched gibber".[29] Chad Bowar for About.com highlighted the band within their scene, praising their "catchy melodies" and "decent riffs and solos", and on Count Your Blessings welcomed the variety in styles of vocal delivery across the collection.[9] However, similarly to Mason, Bowar dubbed the album "way too generic and repetitive", claiming that it features "too many breakdowns" and a majority of "extremely forgettable" songs.[9] Axl Rosenberg of MetalSucks complained that the band displayed "nothing to distinguish them from the pack" on the album, although he did praise the presence of "some decent breakdowns" and claim that the songs would make "good background noise".[11]

ImpactEdit

Due to the young age of the band when they recorded the album and the drastic stylistic changes which followed its release, Count Your Blessings has largely been neglected in recent years, both by the band and by their fans. As early as 2008, guitarist Lee Malia was criticising the album's quality and noting that the band quickly wanted "to do something better" after its release.[35] Following the release of "Drown" in 2014, described by Digital Spy's Adam Silverstein as "a universe away from the ... full-on commotion" of Count Your Blessings, Sykes reflected that the single would have "offended" the band members when they were younger, adding that the group were "never gonna sound like that again".[5]

Keyboardist Jordan Fish (who joined Bring Me the Horizon about 6 years after the album's release) has explained the drastic evolution in style between Count Your Blessings and later releases as simply being due to the fact that the band members "don't listen to deathcore anymore", claiming that to attempt that type of music would be dishonest due to the members' change in tastes and feelings.[36] Alternative Press writer Tyler Sharp has added that "The members of Bring Me the Horizon have evolved from teenage metalheads to a group of mature, progressed songwriters" in response to criticism of their change in style.[37] Most of the album's songs were dropped from live performances in the years following the release of Suicide Season and There Is a Hell..., although "Pray for Plagues" returned to set lists briefly in late 2014 when the band performed with original guitarist Curtis Ward at a few shows.[38][39] The song is featured on the video album Live at Wembley, recorded in December 2014.[40]

Despite the radical evolution of the band since Count Your Blessings, the album has still received some retrospective praise. In a feature published in 2015, Kerrang! writer Emily Carter credited the album for increasing the popularity of the band during their formative years, as well as praising its guitar riffs and the song "Pray for Plagues".[41] AXS contributor Rey Harris described the album as "a classic among deathcore fans", highlighting "Black & Blue" in particular.[12] Sarai C. of Loudwire named "Pray for Plagues" the fourth best Bring Me the Horizon song to date (as of May 2014), praising it as "one of Bring Me the Horizon's most timeless tracks".[42] Dan Slessor for Alternative Press included "Tell Slater Not to Wash His Dick" as the alternative tenth choice in his feature of "The 10 best Bring Me the Horizon songs", praising its "exuberant energy and rich melody".[43]

Track listingEdit

All lyrics written by Oliver Sykes; all songs produced by Bring Me the Horizon and Dan Sprigg.

No.TitleLength
1."Pray for Plagues"4:21
2."Tell Slater Not to Wash His Dick"3:30
3."For Stevie Wonder's Eyes Only (Braille)"4:29
4."A Lot Like Vegas"2:09
5."Black & Blue"4:33
6."Slow Dance"1:16
7."Liquor & Love Lost"2:39
8."(I Used to Make Out With) Medusa"5:39
9."Fifteen Fathoms, Counting"1:56
10."Off the Heezay"5:39
Total length:36:19

PersonnelEdit

Bring Me the Horizon

  • Oliver Sykes – lead vocals
  • Lee Malia – lead guitar
  • Curtis Ward – rhythm guitar
  • Matt Kean – bass guitar
  • Matt Nicholls – drums, percussion

Additional personnel

  • Bring Me the Horizon – production, music
  • Dan Sprigg – production, mixing, mastering
  • Tom Barnes – photography

Credits adapted from the liner notes of Count Your Blessings, Visible Noise[44]

Chart positionsEdit

Chart (2006) Peak
position
UK Albums (OCC)[30] 93
UK Rock & Metal Albums (OCC)[31] 9

Release historyEdit

Region Date Label(s) Formats Edition
United Kingdom 30 October 2006[1] Visible Noise CD, digital download Standard
United States 14 August 2007[17] Earache

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e Welch, Ben (6 April 2016). Bring Me the Horizon: Heavy Sounds from the Steel City. John Blake Publishing. ISBN 978-1784189860.
  2. ^ Pertola, Aleksi (2 November 2011). "Bring Me The Horizon". Rockfreaks.net. Archived from the original on 6 April 2012. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  3. ^ "Album The Bedroom Sessions, Bring Me the Horizon". MTV (in Italian). Archived from the original on 8 May 2019. Retrieved 8 May 2019.
  4. ^ Wilton, Lisa (1 April 2009). "U.K. deathcore band expands horizons". Jam!. Archived from the original on 14 September 2016. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  5. ^ a b Silverstein, Adam (1 December 2014). "Bring Me the Horizon: Our teenage selves would be offended by our new single!". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on 13 September 2016. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  6. ^ Parker, Matt (17 November 2014). "Lee Malia talks Wembley, gear and his guitar roots". MusicRadar. Archived from the original on 11 September 2015. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  7. ^ a b "Matt Nicholls (Bring Me The Horizon) interview". MusicRadar. 31 July 2013. Archived from the original on 28 August 2018. Retrieved 17 September 2018.
  8. ^ Patterson, Dayal (30 October 2016). "Love And Hate: The Irresistible Rise Of Bring Me The Horizon". Metal Hammer. Archived from the original on 31 March 2019. Retrieved 15 April 2019.
  9. ^ a b c d e f Bowar, Chad. "Bring Me The Horizon - Count Your Blessings Review". About.com. Archived from the original on 14 March 2012. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  10. ^ a b c d Whish, Bill (17 September 2007). "Bring Me the Horizon Count Your Blessings". Exclaim!. Archived from the original on 7 November 2017. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  11. ^ a b c Rosenberg, Axl (18 December 2007). "Reviews in Brief: Blood Red Throne's Come Death and Bring Me the Horizon's Count Your Blessings". MetalSucks. Archived from the original on 11 July 2015. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  12. ^ a b Harris, Rey (3 May 2015). "Bring Me The Horizon's 10 best songs". AXS. Archived from the original on 14 September 2016. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  13. ^ a b c Guard, Old; Roberts, Michael (22 November 2007). "Bring Me The Horizon – Count Your Blessings Review". Last Rites. Archived from the original on 18 September 2018. Retrieved 17 September 2018.
  14. ^ a b c Rauf, Raziq (6 November 2006). "Bring Me The Horizon: "It's just party music"". Drowned in Sound. Archived from the original on 14 October 2013. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  15. ^ Savage, MG (9 October 2013). "IN DEFENCE OF: Bring Me The Horizon". Dead Press!. Archived from the original on 18 September 2018. Retrieved 17 September 2018.
  16. ^ a b c McKay, Aaron (9 September 2007). "Bring Me the Horizon - _Count Your Blessings_". Chronicles of Chaos. Archived from the original on 18 September 2018. Retrieved 17 September 2018.
  17. ^ a b "Bring Me The Horizon: 'Count Your Blessings' To Receive U.S. Release In August". Blabbermouth.net. 22 May 2007. Archived from the original on 22 August 2018. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  18. ^ Sharp, Tyler (12 May 2016). "Remember when Bring Me The Horizon covered Slipknot on their debut album?". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on 16 May 2016. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  19. ^ "The stars on 'Higher Voltage'". Kerrang!. 19 June 2007. Archived from the original on 30 June 2009. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  20. ^ "Bring Me The Horizon: 'Pray For Plagues' Video Posted Online". Blabbermouth.net. 4 June 2007. Archived from the original on 23 December 2017. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  21. ^ "Bring Me the Horizon - Pray for Plagues". Kenny Lindström. Archived from the original on 14 April 2016. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  22. ^ "Bring Me the Horizon - For Stevie Wonder's Eyes Only (Braille)". Visible Noise. 6 March 2008. Archived from the original on 10 April 2016. Retrieved 30 March 2016.
  23. ^ "Tour Dates". Visible Noise. Archived from the original on 20 October 2006. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  24. ^ "Abigail Williams Forced To Drop Off U.K. Tour". Blabbermouth.net. 27 October 2006. Archived from the original on 22 August 2018. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  25. ^ "Tour Dates". Visible Noise. Archived from the original on 11 November 2006. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  26. ^ "Bring Me The Horizon Replaces Bury Your Dead On Killswitch Engage's European Tour". Blabbermouth.net. 7 January 2007. Archived from the original on 8 May 2016. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  27. ^ "Tour Dates". Visible Noise. Archived from the original on 18 March 2007. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  28. ^ "Slayer, Marilyn Manson, Killswitch Engage Confirmed For U.K.'s Download Festival". Blabbermouth.net. 13 February 2007. Archived from the original on 10 January 2016. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  29. ^ a b Mason, Stewart. "Count Your Blessings - Bring Me the Horizon: Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 12 October 2016. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  30. ^ a b "Bring Me the Horizon Full Official Chart History". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 31 August 2016. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  31. ^ a b "Official Rock & Metal Albums Chart Top 40: 05 November 2006 – 11 November 2006". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 26 October 2017. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  32. ^ "Official Rock & Metal Albums Chart Top 40: 12 November 2006 – 18 November 2006". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 12 July 2018. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  33. ^ "Official Rock & Metal Albums Chart Top 40: 19 November 2006 – 25 November 2006". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 12 July 2018. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  34. ^ Connick, Tom (15 December 2014). "Bring Me The Horizon: a decade under the influence". DIY. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 3 November 2016.
  35. ^ "Bring Me The Horizon: New Video Interview With Lee Malia Available". Blabbermouth.net. 13 December 2008. Archived from the original on 22 August 2018. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  36. ^ Wiederhorn, Jon (23 July 2015). "Bring Me the Horizon on Ditching Metalcore for Poppy, Positive New LP". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on 26 September 2016. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  37. ^ Sharp, Tyler (24 July 2015). "Why aren't Bring Me The Horizon a deathcore band anymore?". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on 18 May 2016. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  38. ^ Connick, Tom (5 December 2014). "Bring Me The Horizon reunite with original guitarist Curtis Ward for 'Pray For Plagues'". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on 25 May 2016. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  39. ^ Crane, Matt (4 December 2014). "Watch Bring Me The Horizon perform "Pray For Plagues" for the first time in years". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on 2 June 2017. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  40. ^ "Live at the SSE Arena Wembley - Bring Me the Horizon: Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 5 November 2016. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  41. ^ Carter, Emily (18 June 2015). "10 Reasons BMTH's Debut Might Not Be That Bad". Kerrang!. Archived from the original on 10 April 2017. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  42. ^ Sarai C. (29 May 2014). "10 Best Bring Me the Horizon Songs". Loudwire. Archived from the original on 19 September 2016. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  43. ^ Slessor, Dan (30 May 2015). "The 10 best Bring Me The Horizon songs". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on 20 December 2016. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  44. ^ Count Your Blessings (album liner notes). Visible Noise. 2006. 50-176876-19529.

External linksEdit