Confederate States peace commission

The Confederate States peace commission was agreed to on February 15, 1861 in a resolution adopted by the newly-formed Confederate Congress[1] that empowered Confederate President-elect Jefferson Davis to appoint a commission of three men to negotiate "friendly relations" with the United States.

On February 25, Davis, the newly-inaugurated Confederate President, chose Martin J. Crawford of Georgia, John Forsyth of Alabama, and Andre B. Roman of Louisiana to serve as commissioners.[2]

On February 27, Davis wrote a letter[3] to US President-elect Abraham Lincoln to introduce the commissioners as representatives of the Confederate States government. The commission was not received by Lincoln.

On March 12, a letter[4] was sent to William H. Seward, US Secretary of State, to introduce the commissioners and to explain their peaceful intent. The commission was not received by Seward.

On March 15, the commission filed a memorandum,[5] which outlined how they had been ignored by Seward and Lincoln. The commissioners had been rejected because their acceptance would have meant recognition of the Confederate States.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Confederate States of America - A Resolution for the Appointment of Commissioners to the Government of the United States of America". Lillian Goldman Law Library. Retrieved August 22, 2011.
  2. ^ "Confederate States of America - Message to Congress February 25, 1861". Lillian Goldman Law Library. Retrieved August 22, 2011.
  3. ^ "Confederate States of America - Letter of President Davis to President Lincoln February 27, 1861". Lillian Goldman Law Library. Retrieved August 22, 2011.
  4. ^ "Confederate States of America - Confederate Commissioners to Secretary Seward March 12, 1861". Lillian Goldman Law Library. Retrieved August 22, 2011.
  5. ^ "Confederate States of America - Memorandum of March 15, 1861". Lillian Goldman Law Library. Retrieved August 22, 2011.