Confederate Medal of Honor (Sons of Confederate Veterans)

The Confederate Medal of Honor is a posthumous award created by the Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV) in 1977 to recognize Confederate veterans who "distinguished themselves conspicuously by gallantry, bravery, and intrepidity at the risk of life, above and beyond the call of duty" during the American Civil War.

Confederate Medal of Honor
Awarded forConspicuous "gallantry, bravery, and intrepidity at the risk of life, above and beyond the call of duty" during the American Civil War
Date1977; 44 years ago (1977)
Presented byCommander-in-Chief of the
Sons of Confederate Veterans

BackgroundEdit

During the American Civil War, the Confederate States Congress authorized President Jefferson Davis to "bestow medals, with proper devices, upon such officers of the armies of the Confederate States as shall be conspicuous for courage and good conduct on the field of battle, and also to confer a badge of distinction upon one private or non-commissioned officer of each company after every signal victory it shall have assisted to achieve." Lacking adequate manufacturing capability, Adjutant and Inspector General Samuel Cooper belatedly established the "Roll of Honor" on October 3, 1863, in Richmond, Virginia.[1]

HistoryEdit

In 1968, the Sons of Confederate Veterans passed a resolution to issue a "medal of honor" and began minting them in 1977.[2] According to past executive director Ben Sewell, "[t]he SCV created their own Confederate Medal of Honor simply because there were some incredible acts of valor that had received little or no recognition during and after the war".[3] As of 2014, at least 50 medals had been awarded.[3][2]

DesignEdit

The Confederate Medal of Honor is bronze and silver, with two five-pointed stars overlain.[4] Inscribed are the words "Honor. Duty. Valor. Devotion."[4] In the center is the Great Seal of the Confederate States.[4]

CriteriaEdit

Recipients must be shown to have "distinguished themselves conspicuously by gallantry, bravery, and intrepidity at the risk of life, above and beyond the call of duty, while engaged in action against the enemy of the Confederate States of America." Most recommendations are derived from the Confederate Roll of Honor.[2] Medals are provided to museums and libraries under a condition they properly display them.[5]

Notable recipientsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ The Editors of Boston Publishing Company (October 1, 2014). The Medal of Honor: A History of Service Above and Beyond. Voyageur Press. p. 51. ISBN 978-1-62788-494-5.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Tucker, Spencer C. (September 30, 2013). American Civil War: The Definitive Encyclopedia and Document Collection [6 volumes]: The Definitive Encyclopedia and Document Collection. ABC-CLIO. p. 2202. ISBN 978-1-85109-682-4.
  3. ^ a b c d e "Confederate soldiers have their own medal of honor". News Leader. AP. April 26, 2014.
  4. ^ a b c Dishneau, David (April 27, 2014). "Confederate sons honor their heroes with medals". AP. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  5. ^ Sons of Confederate Veterans Awards and Insignia Guide 2013: National Awards and Officer Insignia (PDF). Sons of Confederate Veterans. General Executive Council. 2012. p. 6. Retrieved January 22, 2019.
  6. ^ "Valor In Gray; The Recipients of the Confederate Medal of Honor," Clemmer, Gregg S. Hearthside Pub. Company, 1998.
  7. ^ Staff Reports (July 13, 2012). "Saturday ceremony to honor Confederate officer". Corsicana Daily Sun. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  8. ^ "David Owen Dodd". MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History. Archived from the original on May 13, 2008. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  9. ^ Tucker, Spencer C. (September 30, 2013). American Civil War: The Definitive Encyclopedia and Document Collection [6 volumes]: The Definitive Encyclopedia and Document Collection. https://books.google.com/books?id=9dvYAQAAQBAJ&pg=PA2202#v=onepage&q&f=false: ABC-CLIO. p. 2202. ISBN 978-1-85109-682-4.CS1 maint: location (link)
  10. ^ Alston, Beth (November 9, 2015). "40th annual Wirz Memorial Service held Sunday". Americus Times-Recorder. Retrieved January 26, 2019.

Further readingEdit

  • Clemmer, Gregg S. (1992). Valor in Gray: The Recipients of the Confederate Medal of Honor. Hearthside Pub. ISBN 978-0965098700.

External linksEdit