Circumferential Road 5

Circumferential Road 5 (C-5), informally known as the C-5 Road, is a network of roads and bridges that all together form the fifth beltway of Metro Manila in the Philippines.[2] Spanning some 32.5 kilometers (20.2 mi), it connects the cities of Las Piñas, Makati, Parañaque, Pasay, Pasig, Quezon City, Taguig, and Valenzuela.

C-5
Circumferential Road 5
C-5 Road
C-5 corner Kalayaan Avenue, looking towards Pasig
Route information
Maintained by the Department of Public Works and Highways,[a] the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority, and NLEX Corporation[b]
Length42.3 km (26.3 mi)
Component
highways
Major junctions
Beltway around Metro Manila
North end N1 (MacArthur Highway) in Valenzuela
South end E3 (Manila–Cavite Expressway) in Las Piñas
Location
Major citiesLas Piñas, Makati, Parañaque, Pasay, Pasig, Quezon City, Taguig, and Valenzuela
Highway system
  • Roads in the Philippines

It runs parallel to the four other beltways around Metro Manila, and is also known for being the second most important transportation corridor after Circumferential Road 4.[3]

The route is not yet complete to date, because of certain controversies regarding right of way, but portions of the route are already open for public use.[4] On July 23, 2019, the two segments of the route has been connected together with the completion of the C-5 Southlink Expressway, through a 2.2-kilometer (1.4 mi) flyover over the Skyway and the SLEX in 2019.[5][6]

Route descriptionEdit

C-5 lies parallel to other circumferential roads around Metro Manila, most notably EDSA of C-4, passing through the cities of Valenzuela, Quezon City, Pasig, Makati, Taguig, Pasay, Parañaque, and Las Piñas. The road is divided into several segments.

NLEX Harbor Link ProjectEdit

 
Segment 8.1 (Mindanao Avenue Link) of the NLEX looking west towards Smart Connect Interchange.

From MacArthur Highway in Karuhatan, Valenzuela to Smart Connect Interchange, a cloverleaf interchange with the main line of the North Luzon Expressway (NLEX), C-5 is known as NLEX Karuhatan Link or NLEX Segment 9. It is also the first segment of the NLEX Harbor Link project, which connects the NLEX with Port of Manila.[7] The entire 2.4 kilometers (1.5 mi) toll road is designated as a part of C-5 Road.

From the Smart Connect Interchange to a 3-way signalized junction with Mindanao Avenue, C-5 is known as NLEX–Mindanao Avenue Link or NLEX Segment 8.1. The entire 2.7-kilometer (1.7 mi) toll road is designated as a part of C-5 Road.

Mindanao AvenueEdit

 
Mindanao Avenue in Barangay Tandang Sora, Quezon City

At the eastern end of NLEX Segment 8.1, C-5 turns southeast and becomes Mindanao Avenue. It is a 10-lane divided carriageway that serves as the main transportation corridor of Barangays Talipapa and Tandang Sora in Quezon City. The 3.5 kilometers (2.2 mi) portion of this 6.7-kilometer (4.2 mi) road from NLEX Segment 8.1 to Congressional Avenue is designated as a portion of C-5.

Congressional AvenueEdit

At the signaled junction with Mindanao Avenue, C-5 turns northeast as the Congressional Avenue, a six-lane divided carriageway that serves as the main east to west transportation corridor of Barangays Bahay Toro, Culiat, Pasong Tamo, and Tandang Sora in Quezon City. It then continues east for 3.9 kilometers (2.4 mi) up to Luzon Avenue.

Luzon AvenueEdit

 
Luzon Avenue Flyover

At the end of Congressional Avenue Extension, C-5 turns south as Luzon Avenue, a 4-lane divided city road between Barangays Culiat and Matandang Balara in Quezon City, for 850 meters (2,790 ft) up to Commonwealth Avenue. The 6-lane Luzon Avenue Flyover carries C-5 across Commonwealth Avenue to connect it with Tandang Sora Avenue.

Tandang Sora AvenueEdit

Southeast of Commonwealth Avenue, C-5 is known as Tandang Sora Avenue. It runs for 1 kilometer (0.62 mi) from Barangay Matandang Balara, going around the University of the Philippines Diliman campus, up to the junction with Magsaysay Avenue.

The original planned route of C-5 included the entire 9.6-kilometer (6.0 mi) road; however, due to the incapacity of the road to carry a large amount of vehicular traffic, only the 1-kilometer (0.62 mi) portion of the road from the Luzon Avenue Flyover to Magsaysay Avenue was designated as a portion of C-5 Road. Furthermore, Tandang Sora Avenue becomes a six-lane divided carriageway shortly after crossing Capitol Hills Drive, 350 meters (1,150 ft) south of the flyover.

Katipunan AvenueEdit

 
Katipunan Avenue

After crossing Magsaysay Avenue, C-5 turns south and becomes Katipunan Avenue, a ten-lane divided carriageway that serves as the main transportation corridor of Matandang Balara, Pansol, Loyola Heights, and Project 4 in Quezon City. It heads south for 4.8 kilometers (3.0 mi) until its junction with Bonny Serrano Avenue. Shortly before crossing Bonny Serrano Avenue, a 4-lane divided underpass descends from Katipunan Avenue and traverses underneath Col. Bonny Serrano Avenue and ascends into Libis Flyover, which immediately connects it to E. Rodriguez Jr. Avenue. There is also an access road to the east of Metro Manila via FVR Road in Marikina.

Colonel Bonny Serrano AvenueEdit

C-5 then turns east as Colonel Bonny Serrano Avenue, a four-lane undivided avenue, for 500 meters (1,600 ft) from Katipunan Avenue to Eulogio Rodriguez Jr. Avenue. The Libis Tunnel and Libis Flyover traverse between the avenue's westbound and eastbound lanes.

Eulogio Rodriguez Jr. AvenueEdit

 
Eulogio Rodriguez Jr. Avenue

At its junction with Bonny Serrano Avenue and FVR Road, C-5 then turns south as Eulogio Rodriguez Jr. Avenue, a 6.7-kilometer (4.2 mi), 10-lane divided road that serves as the main thoroughfare between Quezon City and Pasig. The entire road from Bonny Serrano Avenue to Pasig Boulevard is designated as a portion of C-5 Road. The road ends in a junction with Pasig Boulevard and continues onto C.P. Garcia Bridge that crosses the Pasig River and eventually becomes Carlos P. Garcia Avenue shortly afterwards. The avenue is named after Eulogio Rodriguez Jr., a former representative and governor of Rizal.[8]

Carlos P. Garcia AvenueEdit

 
C-5 Road at the intersection with Diego Silang Street in Taguig.

Past the C.P. Garcia Bridge over the Pasig River, C-5 becomes Carlos P. Garcia Avenue. It is a 7.5 kilometres (4.7 mi), fourteen-lane divided road that serves as the main thoroughfare from Makati to Taguig. It passes through a small portion of Makati and continuously passing Taguig, where it then meets the exit ramps to the C-5 Southlink Expressway and the South Luzon Expressway, before ending at the intersection with East Service Road.

C-5 Road ExtensionEdit

Across the South Luzon Expressway, C-5 continues as C-5 Road Extension from West Service Road near Merville Exit of SLEX in Pasay. It traverses south of the Ninoy Aquino International Airport and enters Parañaque. In Barangay Santo Niño, C-5 is briefly known as Kaingin Road, passing by warehouses up to Multinational Avenue. It then curves around Amvel City, crosses Dr. Santos Avenue and Diego Cera Avenue, and ends at its future exit with Manila–Cavite Expressway (CAVITEX) in Las Piñas. The future LRT Line 1 Extension will run along most of the Las Piñas segment of C-5 Road Extension.

Location on the West Valley FaultEdit

Studies conducted by the PHIVOLCS revealed that a large portion of C-5 is built on top of the West Valley Fault. A map of the fault line released on May 18, 2015, shows C-5 in Taguig beside the fault line.[9] The C-5 road is prone to liquefaction.[10]

HistoryEdit

 
The unfinished northern section of the C-5 Kalayaan elevated U-turn slot in March 2009, about two months before its completion.

The proposal for the Metro Manila Arterial Road System was done in the late 1960s.[11] The proposal states of building 10 radial roads and 6 circumferential roads to support the growing vehicular population of Metro Manila.

The Circumferential Road 5 began construction in 1986.[12][11] Under the power of Republic Act 8224, which was passed on November 6, 1996, the C-5 road was legally known as President Carlos P. Garcia Avenue, honoring the eighth president of the Republic of the Philippines, Carlos P. Garcia.[13]

ExtensionsEdit

On July 23, 2007, President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo announced on her State of the Nation Address that C-5 Road will be extended to the north of Metro Manila, from North Luzon Expressway in Quezon City to Navotas and will be extended in the south from South Luzon Expressway in TaguigParañaque boundary to Coastal Road in Las Piñas in the southern part of Ninoy Aquino International Airport.[14]

As of June 2010, the NLEX–Mindanao Avenue Link (Segment 8.1) in Valenzuela and Congressional Avenue Extension from Tandang Sora to Luzon Avenues in Quezon City have been opened to all motorists in the North Extension. Carlos P. Garcia Avenue Extension in the South Extension located in Parañaque were also opened.

In March 2015, the NLEX–Karuhatan Link (Segment 9) was opened to all motorists. The opening of the Segment 9 from NLEx to MacArthur Highway in Karuhatan, Valenzuela served as a preparation for the Holy Week season.

At present, the new Luzon Avenue Flyover connecting Tandang Sora and Luzon Avenues across Commonwealth Avenue was opened to all motorists. Prior to the opening of the flyover, the Congressional Avenue Extension from Visayas to Luzon Avenue was opened in 2010 to decongest heavy traffic in Visayas–Tandang Sora Avenue Intersection.

ControversiesEdit

In 2012, the Senate of the Philippines investigated the south extension project where it would pass several of Manny Villar's properties, such as Camella. The original extension, called Manila–Cavite Toll Expressway Project (MCTEP), was already approved by the Senate and would have been made as a toll expressway. The project eventually resurrected as C-5 Southlink Expressway.[4][15]

C-5 ExpresswayEdit

NLEX Corporation (formerly Manila North Tollways Corporation) and CAVITEX Infrastructure Inc., submitted a proposal for C-5 Expressway, a 19-kilometer (12 mi) fully elevated expressway that would further decongest the existing C-5 and provide a fully controlled-access route between C-5 Southlink Expressway and NLEX Segment 8.2.[16] The proposed expressway would utilize portions of the existing C-5's right of way between SLEX and Pasig Boulevard, and run above Marikina River from Pasig Boulevard to Luzon Avenue.

Exits and intersectionsEdit

 
C-5 Bagong Ilog Flyover
 
Carlos P. Garcia Avenue on the C-5-Kalayaan Interchange in barangay West Rembo, Makati
ProvinceCity/Municipality[c]km[d]miDestinationsNotes
Taguig14.12668.7779East Service RoadSouthern end
  E2 (C-5 Southlink Expressway)  – PasaySouthbound exit and northbound entrance. Six-lane tolled flyover to C-5 Extension across SLEX. Also known as C-5 Southlink Expressway Segment 3A-1 [5][6]
   E2 / AH26 (SLEX)  – Alabang, BatangasHalf-Y interchange. C-5 Exit of SLEX. South end.
15.1851–
15.2237
9.4356–
9.4596
Bayani Road, Marichu Rodriguez Tiñga AvenueHalf-diamond and half-partial cloverleaf interchange. Access to Libingan ng mga Bayani. Future Southeast Metro Manila Expressway (SEMME) exit.
Diego Silang StreetAt-grade intersection. No southbound access. Future Southeast Metro Manila Expressway (SEMME) exit.
17.00010.563Scorpion StreetNo northbound entrance. Northbound access via Diego Silang Street/C-5 Service Road. More commonly known as Palar Underpass.
MakatiAlligator StreetNo Southbound access. Access to Barangay Rizal, Makati.
Blue Voz StreetNo southbound access. Access to Barangays Rizal and Pembo, Makati.
TaguigUpper McKinley RoadTraffic light intersection. Former half-diamond interchange with no northbound access. Access to McKinley Hill.
26th Street, Sampaguita Street, Target Street (Makati)Diamond interchange. Access to Market! Market!, Bonifacio Global City, and Barangay Pembo (Makati).
Market-Market Service RoadSouthbound exit only. Access to Market! Market! And BGC Bus Market! Market! Bus Station.
32nd StreetDirectional T interchange. No northbound exit. Access to Bonifacio Global City.
Makati  N190 (Kalayaan Avenue)C-5-Kalayaan Interchange. Former traffic light intersection. Access to Kalayaan Avenue westbound from C-5 northbound via elevated U-turn slot. Access to Kalayaan Avenue eastbound from C-5 southbound via elevated U-turn slot.
Pasig River20.41812.687C.P. Garcia Bridge
PasigSouth end of Bagong Ilog Flyover. South end of E. Rodriguez Jr. Avenue segment.
  N141 (Pasig Boulevard) / Maximo Flores StreetTraffic light intersection for southbound at-grade only. No left turn and U-turn from C-5 southbound. Route number on at-grade changes from N11 to N141.[1]
  N142 (Pasig Boulevard Extension)Traffic light at-grade intersection
Canley RoadSouthbound at-grade intersection. No northbound access.
14.12858.7790North end of Bagong Ilog Flyover
(Route number on at-grade changes from N141 to N11.)[1]
R. Lanuza AvenueTraffic light intersection. Access to PhilSports Arena.
Northbound only. Access to Dr. Sixto Antonio Avenue via P. Conducto Street.
Julia Vargas AvenueTraffic light intersection. Access to SM Center Pasig, Tiendesitas, and Ortigas Center.
Eagle DriveNorthbound entry only
South end of Ortigas Flyover
  N60 (Ortigas Avenue)C-5-Ortigas Interchange. Traffic light intersection at grade. No left turns from northbound. Access to C-5 southbound either through flyover ramp or traffic light intersection.
Quezon City16.986–
12.612
10.555–
7.837
North end of Ortigas Flyover
Greenmeadows AvenueTraffic light intersection
Calle IndustriaTraffic light intersection
Eastwood DriveTraffic light intersection. Access to Eastwood City.
South end of Libis Flyover
14.2348.845C-5 Access RoadExit only for C-5 northbound. Entrance to C-5 southbound and northbound. North end of E. Rodriguez Jr. Avenue segment. East end of Bonny Serrano Avenue segment.
West end of Libis Flyover
East end of Libis Tunnel
11.9757.441  N185 (Bonny Serrano Avenue) / Katipunan AvenueTraffic light intersection. West end of Bonny Serrano Avenue segment. South end of Katipunan Avenue segment.
North end of Libis Tunnel
P. Tuazon Boulevard, Major S. Dizon StreetNo left turns. Right-in/right-out for northbound intersection.
South end of Katipunan Flyover
  N59 (Aurora Boulevard/Marcos Highway)Left turn and right turn from southbound service road. Right turn only from northbound service road.
Xavierville AvenueAccessible from Katipunan Flyover southbound service road only
North end of Katipunan Flyover
13.944–
15.1060
8.664–
9.3864
Carlos P. Garcia AvenueTraffic light intersection. Route number change from N11 to N129.[1]
Magsaysay AvenueGated access to the University of the Philippines Diliman. No left turns to Katipunan Avenue northbound.
Mactan StreetRoundabout
Capitol Drive
15.7439.782Tandang Sora AvenueSouthbound access only. North end of Katipunan Avenue segment.
South end of Luzon Avenue Flyover
  N170 (Commonwealth Avenue)Ramps with U-turns
North end of Luzon Avenue Flyover
Luzon AvenueNorth end of Luzon Avenue segment. West end of Congressional Avenue segment.
Tandang Sora AvenueAccess via U-turn slots from opposite directions
Visayas AvenueTraffic light intersection
   N129 (Congressional Avenue) / N128 (Mindanao Avenue)Traffic light intersection. West end of Congressional Avenue segment. South end of Mindanao Avenue segment. Route number changes from N129 to N128.[1]
Road 20, Road 20 ExtensionAccessible via U-turn slot from opposite directions
Tandang Sora AvenueAccessible via U-turn slot from opposite directions. Access to St. James College of Quezon City
South end of Mindanao Avenue Underpass
  N127 (Quirino Highway)Traffic light intersection
North end of Mindanao Avenue Underpass
Valenzuela  N128 (Mindanao Avenue)North end of Mindanao Avenue section[1]
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

NLEX Mindanao Avenue & Karuhatan LinkEdit

The entire route will be located in Valenzuela. The kilometer count, which would be shown here in its approximate values, increments east and west of Smart Connect Interchange as it branches off NLEX Main. 

kmmiExitNameDestinationsNotes
15.99.9Mindanao Avenue  N128 (Mindanao Avenue)  – Quezon CityEastern end of expressway; link to the future NLEX Segment 8.2
15.399.56Mindanao toll plaza (westbound only)
15.299.50Mindanao toll plaza expansion (westbound only; exclusively for Class 1)
138.1Smart Connect Interchange   E1 / AH26 (NLEX Main)  – Balintawak, TarlacCloverleaf interchange with collector lanes; kilometer count reverses
14.719.14ParadaWestbound exit only
15.009.32Gen. T. De LeonEastbound exit only
16.1510.04Karuhatan toll plaza (eastbound only)
16.210.1Karuhatan  N1 (MacArthur Highway)  – KaruhatanDiamond interchange; northern end of C-5; continues west as   E5 (NLEX Harbor Link)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

C-5 ExtensionEdit

ProvinceCity/MunicipalitykmmiDestinationsNotes
Las Piñas  E3 (CAVITEX)  – ManilaRight-in/right-out interchange. Entry to CAVITEx only. Western end of C-5 Extension.
  N62 (P. Diego Cera Avenue)At-grade intersection
Fruto Santos AvenueAt-grade intersection
Sipag Center
Naga RoadAt-grade intersection
ParañaqueSouth end of Sucat Flyover
  N63 (Dr. A. Santos Avenue)Eastbound exit and westbound entrance. Access to SM City Sucat.
Old Sucat RoadWestbound exit and eastbound entrance. Access to Amvel City and Dr. A. Santos Avenue.
North end of Sucat Flyover
Amvel CityPartial cloverleaf interchange. Access to   N195 (Ninoy Aquino Avenue).
Multinational AvenueTraffic light intersection. Serves Multinational Village. This is known for infamously causing severe heavy traffic during rush hours.
E. Rodriguez AvenueAt-grade intersection. Future interchange with CAVITEX–C-5 Southlink Expressway
PasayMoonwalk Access RoadAt-grade intersection, and right-in/right out interchange.
Neil Armstrong AvenueAt-grade intersection. Also known as Moonwalk Exit due to its gated accessibility into Moonwalk Village.
  E2 (C-5 Southlink Expressway)  – TaguigEastbound exit and westbound entrance. Also known as C-5 Southlink Expressway Segment 3A1 [6]
West Service RoadAt-grade intersection. Eastern end of C-5 Extension.
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

NotesEdit

  1. ^ The Department of Public Works and Highways maintains the non-expressway and main section of C-5 from Valenzuela to Taguig only.[1]
  2. ^ NLEX Corporation maintains the expressway section of C-5.
  3. ^ Sources:[17][18][19]
  4. ^ Sources:[20][21][22]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Road and Bridge Inventory". www.dpwh.gov.ph. Archived from the original on October 22, 2020. Retrieved July 5, 2020.
  2. ^ "Metro Manila Infrastructure Development" (PDF). University of the Philippines Diliman. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  3. ^ Flores, Asti (February 7, 2013). "MMDA, DPWH name C5 Road as alternate route for EDSA overhaul". GMA News. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  4. ^ a b "Controversies regarding the C-5 Road". slideshare.net. Retrieved January 5, 2013.
  5. ^ a b "Section of CAVITEX- C5 Southlink opens". ABS-CBN News. July 23, 2019. Retrieved June 7, 2020.
  6. ^ a b c "Taguig-Parañaque section of C5 South Link Expressway opens to motorists July 23". GMA News Online. Retrieved August 18, 2019.
  7. ^ "Concessions". NLEX Corporation. Retrieved May 22, 2020.
  8. ^ Official Directory of the House of Representatives (1954-1957). Philippines. Congress (1940-1973). House of Representatives. 1955. p. 214.
  9. ^ Ranada, Pia (May 18, 2015). "High resolution West Valley Fault maps launched". Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  10. ^ See, Aie (March 25, 2011). "C-5 Road, 3 Taguig barangays prone to liquefaction". Philstar. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  11. ^ a b "Overview of the Metro Manila Arterial Road System". Department of Public Works and Highways. Archived from the original on September 28, 2011. Retrieved January 5, 2013.
  12. ^ "The Circumferential Road 5". scribd.com. Retrieved January 5, 2013.
  13. ^ Chan Robles Virtual Law Library. "REPUBLIC ACT NO. 8224-THE ACT OF CHANGING THE NAME OF THE C-5 ROAD TO CARLOS P. GARCIA AVENUE, TO HONOR CARLOS P. GARCIA, THE 8TH PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES". Retrieved January 5, 2013.
  14. ^ Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines. "State of the Nation Address, July 23, 2007". Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  15. ^ Legaspi, Amita (January 25, 2012). "Villar intervened in C-5 project for his own benefit". GMA News. Retrieved March 17, 2013.
  16. ^ "C-5 Expressway". DPWH PPP Portal. Department of Public Works and Highways. Retrieved July 30, 2018.
  17. ^ Department of Public Works and Highways (2016). "Atlas 2016 Road Surface Type and Condition: Metro Manila 1st" (Map). 2016 Road Data. 1:70000. Retrieved May 19, 2017.[permanent dead link]
  18. ^ Department of Public Works and Highways (2016). "Atlas 2016 Road Surface Type and Condition: Metro Manila 2nd" (Map). 2016 Road Data. 1:45000. Retrieved May 19, 2017.[permanent dead link]
  19. ^ Department of Public Works and Highways (2016). "Atlas 2016 Road Surface Type and Condition: Quezon City 2nd" (Map). 2016 Road Data. 1:45000. Retrieved May 19, 2017.[permanent dead link]
  20. ^ "Metro Manila 1st". 2016 Road Data. Department of Public Works and Highways. Archived from the original on May 28, 2017. Retrieved May 19, 2017.
  21. ^ "Metro Manila 2nd". 2016 Road Data. Department of Public Works and Highways. Archived from the original on November 30, 2017. Retrieved May 19, 2017.
  22. ^ "Quezon City 2nd". 2016 Road Data. Department of Public Works and Highways. Archived from the original on December 2, 2017. Retrieved May 19, 2017.