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Chuck Person's Eccojams Vol. 1 is an album by American electronic musician Daniel Lopatin, released under the one-time pseudonym Chuck Person. It was released on August 8, 2010 via The Curatorial Club as a limited edition cassette. The album is often credited with pioneering the musical genre and aesthetic style known as vaporwave.[5][6]

Chuck Person's Eccojams Vol. 1
Chuck Person's Eccojams Vol. 1
Cover art
Studio album by
Released8 August 2010
Recorded2009-10
Genre
Length54:56
LabelThe Curatorial Club[4]
ProducerDaniel Lopatin
Daniel Lopatin albums chronology
Rifts
(2009)
Chuck Person's Eccojams Vol. 1
(2010)
Returnal
(2010)

Contents

BackgroundEdit

Eccojams Vol. 1 consists of what Lopatin calls "echo jams": sample-based, looped audio pieces which typically chop up micro-excerpts of 80's pop songs or other forms of popular music and "slow them down narcotically" with effects such as echo and pitch shifting added in a manner reminiscent of chopped and screwed styles.[7][8] The album samples tracks from pop acts such as Fleetwood Mac, Toto, and Heart.[7] Its artwork, drawing on crude graphical aesthetics from the 1980s, incorporates fragments of cover art for the Mega Drive and Mega-CD versions of the video game Ecco the Dolphin.[9]

Several tracks on the album were utilized in Lopatin's audio-visual project Memory Vague (2009).[10] The tracks A2, B4, and A4, titled "angel," "nobody here," and "demerol" respectively, had previously been released on Lopatin's YouTube account sunsetcorp.[11] When asked about the possibility of an accompanying Volume 2 seeing release, Lopatin alluded to having "multiple volumes of eccojams in the cryotank set to defrost in the distant future."[12][7]

ReleaseEdit

Eccojams Vol. 1 was released as a limited edition cassette in 2010.[7] Though Lopatin would soon turn to other projects, the album would inspire a number of artists, who used Eccojams as a starting point for what would become the Internet-birthed vaporwave genre.[9][7] When later asked about the influence of Eccojams, he stated that he "always hoped it would be something people would just do -- its kinda folky by nature."[12] The technique would lead to his 2011 Oneohtrix Point Never album Replica.[7]

In 2016, Eccojams Vol. 1 was described as a "seminal release" by Tiny Mix Tapes, who noted that original copies of the album sell on Discogs for a median cost of $250.[7] The publication described the project as "plundering the depths of pop music and uncovering short musical segments or particularly existential lyrical moments" to create "a simple yet wholly ecstatic listening experience."[7] Critic Simon Reynolds characterized it in 2011 as "relat[ing] to cultural memory and the buried utopianism within capitalist commodities, especially those related to consumer technology in the computing and audio/video entertainment area".[14]

Lopatin released an official remaster for digital download in 2016.[7]

Track listingEdit

Side one

  1. "A1" (2:44)
  2. "A2" (4:02)
  3. "A3" (6:32)
  4. "A4" (2:05)
  5. "A5" (3:04)
  6. "A6" (3:00)
  7. "A7" (2:28)
  8. "A8" (5:13)

Side two

  1. "B1" (4:54)
  2. "B2" (4:56)
  3. "B3" (4:35)
  4. "B4" (2:19)
  5. "B5" (3:04)
  6. "B6" (2:33)
  7. "B7" (4:27)

[15]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Seraydarian, Thomas. "Crossfader's Vaporwave Primer". Crossfader. Retrieved 8 April 2017.
  2. ^ Beauchamp, Scott. "HOW VAPORWAVE WAS CREATED THEN DESTROYED BY THE INTERNET". Esquire. Retrieved 8 April 2017.
  3. ^ a b Bowe, Miles. "Band To Watch: Saint Pepsi". Stereogum. Retrieved 26 June 2016.
  4. ^ "TCC01". The Curatorial Club. August 8, 2010. Retrieved 22 October 2015.
  5. ^ Ward, Christian (January 29, 2014). "Vaporwave: Soundtrack to Austerity". Stylus. Retrieved February 8, 2014.
  6. ^ Parker, James. "Datavis + Forgotten Light Prism Projector". Tiny Mix Tapes. Retrieved February 8, 2014.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i P, Mr. "Daniel Lopatin releases remastered version of Chuck Person's Eccojams Vol. 1". Tiny Mix Tapes. Retrieved 10 August 2017.
  8. ^ Reynolds, Simon (July 6, 2010). "Brooklyn's Noise Scene Catches Up to Oneohtrix Point Never". The Village Voice. Village Voice, LLC. Retrieved December 8, 2015.
  9. ^ a b Han, Sean Francis; Peters, Daniel (May 18, 2016). "Vaporwave: subversive dream music for the post-Internet age". Bandwagon. Retrieved January 7, 2017.
  10. ^ Whiteley, Sheila; Rambarran, Shara (January 22, 2016). The Oxford Handbook of Music and Virtuality. Oxford University Press. p. 412.
  11. ^ "sunsetcorp". YouTube. Retrieved 22 October 2015.
  12. ^ a b "I'm Daniel Lopatin, pka Oneohtrix Point Never. AMA". Reddit. Oct 8, 2013. Retrieved 22 October 2015.
  13. ^ "Chuck Person: Chuck Person's Eccojams Vol. 1 - Spectrum Culture". Spectrum Culture. 2016-12-04. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  14. ^ Reynolds, Simon (June 2011). Retromania: Pop Culture's Addiction to Its Own Past. Faber and Faber Ltd. ISBN 978-0571232086.
  15. ^ Chuck Person (2010-08-08), Chuck Person's Eccojams vol.1, retrieved 2019-02-04

External linksEdit