Chuck McMann

Charles McMann[1] (May 11, 1951 – July 20, 2021) was a Canadian professional football running back who played 10 seasons in the Canadian Football League (CFL) for the Montreal Alouettes and Montreal Concordes. He went on to serve as special teams coordinator and running backs coach for the BC Lions. He was also the head coach of the Waterloo Warriors and McGill Redmen of CIS football, while being named the CIS Coach of the Year in 2002 with the latter. He won a Grey Cup championship in 1977 as a player, before winning three more championships as a coach.

Chuck McMann
Born:(1951-05-11)May 11, 1951
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Died:July 20, 2021(2021-07-20) (aged 70)
Qualicum Beach, British Columbia, Canada
Career information
CFL statusNational
Position(s)RB
Height6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Weight202 lb (92 kg)
CollegeWilfrid Laurier
CFL draft1976 / Round: 3 / Pick: 24
Career history
As coach
1988–1991Waterloo Warriors (HC)
19922000Calgary Stampeders (AC)
2001–2006McGill Redmen (HC)
2007Calgary Stampeders (RC)
2008–2021BC Lions (STC/RBC)
As player
1976–1981Montreal Alouettes
1982–1985Montreal Concordes
Career highlights and awards

Early lifeEdit

McMann was born in Toronto on May 11, 1951.[2][3] He studied at Wilfrid Laurier University, where he played football for the Golden Hawks from 1973 to 1976.[2][4] He was subsequently drafted by the Montreal Alouettes in the third round of the 1976 CFL Draft.[2][5]

Professional careerEdit

McMann played for the Montreal Alouettes and its successor Montreal Concordes from 1976 to 1985. During this time, the franchise made three appearances in Grey Cup games and won the championship in 1977.[2] He retired at the conclusion of the 1985 season.[3]

Coaching careerEdit

After retiring as a player, McMann served as head coach of the Waterloo Warriors from 1988 until 1991.[2] He went on to join the Calgary Stampeders the following year. As part of Wally Buono's coaching staff, McMann won championship rings in 1992 and 1998. His first stint with the franchise came to an end after the 2000 season.[5][6]

McMann became the head football coach at McGill University in 2001, succeeding Charlie Baillie. The Redmens won the Dunsmore Cup during his first two seasons,[2] and he was conferred the CIS Frank Tindall Trophy in 2002 as Canadian university football's coach of the year.[4] In October 2005, the university administration called off the team's final two games of the season, in response to substantiated reports that most players had engaged in hazing at the start of the academic year. McMann initially suspended one player for an indefinite period and five players for one game. He was dismayed by the decision to cancel the rest of the season. Although he sympathized with university's "need to make a strong statement", he felt that the players "ha[d] been punished enough".[7] Several former Redmen players demanded that McMann be dismissed. However, the university's interim athletic director said that firing McMann was never contemplated, given that he denied being aware of the hazing.[8]

Overall, the Redmens finished with an even 28–28 record and reached the playoffs five times during McMann's six seasons with the team.[4] McMann resigned in January 2007 with one more year remaining on his contract. He cited personal reasons, adding that he wanted to "spend more time coaching and less on administrative matters".[4] He later returned to the Stampeders that same month as receivers coach,[9] before being released at the end of the season.[10]

McMann joined the BC Lions in 2008 as its special teams coordinator and running backs coach, reuniting with Buono.[11][12] He won his fourth and final Grey Cup championship with the franchise in 2011.[11] He retired at the end of the 2015 season.[13]

Personal lifeEdit

McMann was married to Margaret until his death.[2] They resided in Langley, British Columbia, where he was a member of the Willoughby Christian Reformed Church,[14] and she taught at Langley Christian High School. He brought the Grey Cup trophy to the school in January 2012, shortly after the Lions' victory the previous year.[15] They later moved to Vancouver Island.[2]

McMann died at the age of 70 on July 20, 2021, after collapsing while riding his bike near his home on the Island.[2][5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Draft Tracker". CFL.ca. Archived from the original on September 23, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Zurkowsky, Herb (July 21, 2021). "Former Alouettes rusher, McGill head coach Chuck McMann dies at 70". Montreal Gazette. Retrieved July 21, 2021.
  3. ^ a b "Chuck McMann football statistics". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 21, 2021.
  4. ^ a b c d Attfield, Paul (January 24, 2007). "McMann steps down as McGill's football coach". The Globe and Mail. Toronto. Archived from the original on July 22, 2021. Retrieved July 22, 2021.
  5. ^ a b c "Chuck McMann, who won Grey Cups as CFL player and coach, passes away at 70". CBC News. The Canadian Press. July 21, 2021. Retrieved July 21, 2021.
  6. ^ "Stampeders mourn the death of Chuck McMann". Calgary Stampeders. July 21, 2021. Retrieved July 21, 2021.
  7. ^ Peritz, Ingrid (October 19, 2005). "McGill cuts its season short". The Globe and Mail. Toronto. Archived from the original on March 8, 2021. Retrieved July 22, 2021.
  8. ^ Mirtle, James (September 30, 2006). "McKeown happy to be back on field". The Globe and Mail. Toronto. Archived from the original on July 23, 2021. Retrieved July 22, 2021.
  9. ^ Maki, Allan (January 30, 2007). "McMann believed to be rejoining Stamps' staff". The Globe and Mail. Toronto. Archived from the original on July 22, 2021. Retrieved July 22, 2021.
  10. ^ "Hufnagel confirms coaching staff for 2008 season". The Globe and Mail. Toronto. December 11, 2007. Archived from the original on July 22, 2021. Retrieved July 22, 2021.
  11. ^ a b Baker, Matt (July 21, 2021). "Lions Mourn Loss Of Longtime Former Coach Chuck McMann". BC Lions. Retrieved July 21, 2021.
  12. ^ Sekeres, Matthew (January 31, 2008). "Jackson re-ups with Lions". The Globe and Mail. Toronto. Archived from the original on July 22, 2021. Retrieved July 22, 2021.
  13. ^ "Special teams coordinator Chuck McMann Retires". BC Lions. December 5, 2015. Archived from the original on July 22, 2021. Retrieved July 21, 2021.
  14. ^ deGroot, Jenny (January 27, 2012). "Football's Grey Cup Brightens a Winter Day in B.C." The Banner. Christian Reformed Church in North America. Retrieved July 22, 2021.
  15. ^ Gathercole, Miranda (January 5, 2012). "Grey Cup comes to Langley". Langley Advance Times. Archived from the original on July 22, 2021. Retrieved July 22, 2021.

External linksEdit