Christian Brothers High School (Memphis, Tennessee)

Christian Brothers High School (CBHS) is located in Memphis, Tennessee, at 5900 Walnut Grove Road. It is a Catholic, all-male college preparatory school which has a Lasallian tradition.

Christian Brothers High School
Christian Brothers High School (Memphis) logo.jpg
Address
5900 Walnut Grove Road

,
38120

United States
Coordinates35°07′51″N 89°51′51″W / 35.130880°N 89.864290°W / 35.130880; -89.864290Coordinates: 35°07′51″N 89°51′51″W / 35.130880°N 89.864290°W / 35.130880; -89.864290
Information
School typePrivate Roman Catholic Non-profit All-boys College Preparatory educational institution
MottoVirtus et Scientia (Latin)
(Character and Knowledge)
Religious affiliation(s)Roman Catholic
Established1871; 149 years ago (1871)
PresidentBr. David Poos, FSC[1][2]
PrincipalJames Brummer
Grades912
GenderBoys
Enrollment821 (2020)
Campusm
Campus size27 acres (110,000 m2)
Campus typeUrban
Color(s) Purple  and  Gold 
Athletics conferenceAAA West TSSAA
NicknamePurple Wave
RivalMemphis University School
AccreditationSACS[3][4]
PublicationPurple & Gold
NewspaperThe Maurelian
YearbookChronicle
AffiliationChristian Brothers University
Websitewww.cbhs.org

HistoryEdit

In 1963, Christian Brothers accepted Jesse Turner, Jr., making CBHS the first integrated high school in Memphis, public or private. Turner graduated as co-salutatorian in 1967.[5] [6]

Notable alumniEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Waddelove, Anna. "President Appointed at Christian Brothers High School, Memphis". Archived from the original on February 3, 2019. Retrieved February 3, 2019.
  2. ^ "Brother David Poos, FSC announced as next President of CBHS". Christian Brothers High School. October 25, 2018.
  3. ^ "CBHS School Profile". Christian Brothers High School. 2009. Archived from the original on September 25, 2009. Retrieved August 30, 2009.
  4. ^ SACS-CASI. "SACS-Council on Accreditation and School Improvement". Archived from the original on April 16, 2010. Retrieved June 23, 2009.
  5. ^ Rubio, Daniel (July 7, 2017). "Integrating Memphis Schools". Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  6. ^ Roberts, Jane (September 17, 2018). "How Brother Terence McLaughlin Helped Transform Memphis". Retrieved August 23, 2020.
  7. ^ Beifuss, John (June 9, 2010). "Always the comedian, Dominic Dierkes takes his skits beyond YouTube". The Commercial Appeal. Retrieved May 30, 2014.
  8. ^ a b Goldstein, Kevin (February 25, 2010). "Future Shock". Baseball Prospectus. Retrieved November 20, 2015.
  9. ^ Lembo, John (March 18, 2013). "Pirates' Phil Irwin no stranger to adversity". Bradenton Herald. Archived from the original on May 31, 2014. Retrieved May 30, 2014.
  10. ^ Singer, Tom (November 7, 2013). "AFL a chance for Irwin to get on Bucs' radar". MLB.com. Retrieved May 30, 2014.
  11. ^ Calkins, Geoff (February 14, 2010). "Mike Jankowski's life hardly a 'pipe dream". The Commercial Appeal. Retrieved May 30, 2014.
  12. ^ "Chuck Lanza". The Pro Football Archives. Archived from the original on May 31, 2014. Retrieved May 30, 2014.
  13. ^ McCarver, Tim; Peary, Danny (2013). Tim McCarver's Baseball for Brain Surgeons and Other Fans. Random House. p. 327. ISBN 9780307831774. Retrieved November 20, 2015.
  14. ^ "A Tale of Three Memphians". Sports Illustrated. May 28, 2004. Retrieved November 14, 2007.
  15. ^ a b Mell, Randall (August 18, 2003). "Micheel's Stunning Shot Clinches Title". Sun-Sentinel. Retrieved May 30, 2014.
  16. ^ Stukenborg, Phil (February 25, 2014). "Richard Mulrooney named University of Memphis men's soccer coach". The Commercial Appeal. Retrieved May 30, 2014.
  17. ^ White, Stephanie Nerissa (March 31, 2013). "Dr. John Shea Presents his Professional Papers to the Memphis Public Library". The Commercial Appeal. Retrieved May 30, 2014.

External linksEdit