Chris Daw

Christopher Daw (born February 1, 1970 in North York, Ontario) is a Paralympian who competed in adaptive track, marathons, wheelchair basketball, volleyball, wheelchair rugby, and curling for Canada.[1] He was once considered the fastest wheelchair athlete in 1985 through 1987, and is the only Canadian athlete to represent Canada at multiple Paralympic Games for multiple different sports. He is also one of the few athletes to represent Canada at both Summer & Winter Paralympic Games. In 1986, he won 6 Gold medals and set 6 world records at the first World Games for disabled youth in Nottingham, England. He was a member of the 1984 & 1988 Canadian Paralympic adaptive track teams; a member of the Canadian Wheelchair Basketball team, and a member of the Canadian Wheelchair Rugby Team at the 2000 Summer Paralympics before taking up wheelchair curling in 2000.

Christopher Daw
Images (7) - Chris Daw Headshot.jpg
Personal information
Nickname(s)Logan, Dawsy, JAFO
Born(1970-02-01)February 1, 1970
North York, Ontario
Home townStrathroy, Ontario
EducationStrathroy District Collegiate Institute
Alma materUniversity of Tennessee
OccupationAthlete, Executive Director/General Manager, Motivational Speaker, Business Consultant
Height5 ft 9 in (175 cm)
Weight275 lb (125 kg)
Spouse(s)M. Brown 1993-2006
M. Perry 2009-2015
Websitechrisdaw.ca
Sport
Country Canada

During Daw's athletic career he has attended over 125 National Championships, 64 World Championships, 4 Paralympics and 1 Olympics for a medal total over 1000+ for Canada including a dozen World Championships, 19 World records and Paralympic medal performances. Some of his sports include Canadian representation for Track, Basketball, Rugby, Volleyball, and Curling. However; he has also participated as an elite athlete in Field, Badminton and countless others at international, national and provincial levels.

CurlingEdit

 
Daw delivering a stone

He entered curling in 2000. He was the skip of the Canadian team at the 2002 World Wheelchair Curling Championship in Sursee, Switzerland, where the team won silver.[2] Two years later, he would again be the skip of the Canadian team and the Wheelchair Curling championship, again in Sursee, where the team won bronze.[2] He would be the skip of the Canadian team, which won Gold in Wheelchair curling at the 2006 Winter Paralympics. In 2007 he withdrew his name from the Team Canada selection process that could have led to a spot on the 2010 Winter Paralympics. He resurfaced as part of the Wheelchair Curling Team for Newfoundland as Skip in 2008, only to relocate to British Columbia in 2009. He was the General manager of the Vancouver Curling Club when it took over the Olympic Curling center (now Hillcrest Center) in 2011.

In 2010, it was announced that Daw was returning to competitive curling by joining Jim Armstrong (curler). As Jim's second on a local BC team in provincial play-downs; with hopes of representing Team BC. Team Armstrong was unsuccessful in capturing the 2011 BC Championship title. Armstrong would later move to Ontario. Daw would announce his retirement in December 2010.[3][4]

RetirementEdit

In 2010, Daw formally announced his retirement from competitive sports to focus on his family and career.[5] In January 2012 after Eric Eales of wheelchaircurling.com stopped publishing his blog posting[6] on wheelchair curling; it was announced Daw was taking over with a new blog spot called Wheelchair Curling Blog 2.[7] Daw received over 5000 readers in the first month on the new blog which changed formats allowing for publishing of stories on wheelchair curling from around the world through direct input by the players, coaches or interested parties. The blog after 2015 National championships in Quebec experienced over 5.5 million+ viewers.[6]

Post retirement Daw has also been very active as a motivational speaker; as a speaker for the Rick Hansen foundation.

2010 for the Vancouver games as the lead curling commentator for CBC curling.[13]

Business venturesEdit

After leaving Vancouver in 2011, in 2012, Daw signed on with Ken Strong to support a sports venue, Ice Twice Rinks Inc.[8] in Oakville, Ontario. He became the Executive Director of the business. In eight months, Daw was able to fully recover the facility from financial hardship. With dimensions over 70,000 square feet, the facility was home to two rinks, a goalie pad, a shooting pad, a board room, a multi-purpose room, and space for dry land training. Programs at the rink were run by experienced coaches such as Al Iafrate, Eddi Choi, Christina Kessler, Ryan Munce, and Bill Hoover. Daw left Ice Twice Rinks in 2015, which was sold in for profit to Jamie Allison; a former NHL player with the Chicago Blackhawks.[9]

Since 2000 Daw has been a leading reporter on the sport of wheelchair curling including the creation of the Wcblog2.com. [10] In 2018 Daw decided to close down the Wcblog2.com due to lack of information sharing and time commitment restrictions. Daw has also done extensive work with CBC television during the Paralympic games as a commentator in 2010, 2014 and 2018. Along with his Paralympic work, Daw began working with CBC on other ventures, including 2018 Canadian Wheelchair Curling Championships.

DisabilityEdit

Daw's official disability has never been known. He has compounded his disability through numerous injuries over his athletic career, additional medical conditions and professional endeavors. With this, he is the only known person to be classifiable at the Paralympics as both a paraplegic and quadriplegic competitor.

 
Chris Daw - Rick Hanson Engagement

Personal lifeEdit

In 2006 it was reported that Daw had one child a son; Kyle, with his first wife Mari Brown.[11] In March, 2009 Daw married Morgan Perry, a former member of Canada's junior women's softball team. On February 23, 2010, Daw and Perry gave birth to a daughter Arowyn Emma Ellie. Daw and Perry separated in 2015.

In April 2010, Daw lost his mother Eleanor Daw at 63 years from a heart attack. According to Daw, her loss has had a profound change in him which he often referred to the reason behind his retirement from international sport.[12]

In October 2014 after going to the doctor for what Daw thought was Kidney stones it was discovered he had renal cell carcinoma. The aggressive cancer caused Daw to undergo surgery on December 29, 2014 having a Partial nephrectomy. Daw quickly recovered from the surgery healing in less than 4 weeks time.

AwardsEdit

In 2010, Daw was inducted into the London Sports Hall of Fame on September 23, 2010 at a ceremony including Christine Nesbitt and Tessa Virtue & Scott Moir.[13]

Daw's accomplishments included the following; one of the longest active Paralympic careers in history. During his athletic career he has attended over 125 National Championships, 64 World Championships, 4 Paralympics and 1 Olympics. For an estimated medal total over 1000+ for Canada including a dozen World Championships, 19 World records and Paralympic Gold medal performances. His sports include Canadian representation for Track, Basketball, Rugby, Volleyball, and Curling. He has also participated as an elite athlete in hockey, field, parachuting; rock climbing, badminton and holds high level black belts in Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu.[14]

Selected resultsEdit

  Olympic Games
Finish Event Year Place Position Team
Alternate Wheelchair Adaptive Track 1984   United States Los Angeles Alternate   Canada
  Paralympic Games
Finish Event Year Place Position Team
Gold Wheelchair Curling[15] 2006   Italy Torino Skip   Canada
4th Wheelchair Rugby[15] 2000   Australia Sydney Player #10   Canada
Bronze Wheelchair Adaptive Track[15] 1988   South Korea Seoul Participant   Canada
Wheelchair Adaptive Track[15] 1984   United Kingdom Stoke Mandeville Participant   Canada
  Para PanAM Games
Finish Event Year Place Position Team
Bronze Sit-Volleyball 2007   Brazil Rio Player   Canada
  World Wheelchair Curling Championship
Finish Event Year Place Position Team
Silver Wheelchair curling[16] 2002    Switzerland Sursee Skip   Canada
Gold Wheelchair curling[16] 2003   Scotland Scotland Skip   Canada
Bronze Wheelchair curling[16] 2004    Switzerland Sursee Skip   Canada
6. Wheelchair curling[16] 2005   Scotland Glasgow Skip   Canada
4. Wheelchair curling 2007   Sweden Sollefteå Skip   Canada
  Canadian Wheelchair Curling Championship
Finish Event Year Place Position Team
Gold Wheelchair curling[17] 2003   Ontario Toronto Skip   Canada
Gold Wheelchair curling[17] 2005   British Columbia Richmond Skip   Canada
Gold Wheelchair curling[17] 2006   British Columbia Richmond Skip   Canada
6th[18] Wheelchair curling 2009   Nova Scotia Halifax Skip   Newfoundland and Labrador
  Provincial Wheelchair Curling Championship
Finish Event Year Place Position Team
Bronze Wheelchair curling[17] 2011   British Columbia Kimberley 2nd Armstrong
  First World Games for Disabled Youth (Nottingham, England)
Finish Event Year Place Result Team
Gold Wheelchair Adaptive Track [15] 1986   United Kingdom Nottingham World Record   Canada
Gold Wheelchair Adaptive Track [15] 1986   United Kingdom Nottingham World Record   Canada
Gold Wheelchair Adaptive Track [15] 1986   United Kingdom Nottingham World Record   Canada
Gold Wheelchair Adaptive Track [15] 1986   United Kingdom Nottingham World Record   Canada
Gold Wheelchair Adaptive Track [15] 1986   United Kingdom Nottingham World Record   Canada
Gold Wheelchair Adaptive Track [15] 1986   United Kingdom Nottingham World Record   Canada
  Awards and Recognition
Award Awarded by; Description Place Year Country
Rick Hansan Relay[19] Town of Strathroy Medal Bearer   Ontario Strathroy, Ontario 2011   Canada
Hall of Fame[20] City of London London Sports Hall of Fame   Ontario London, Ontario 2010   Canada
King Clancy Award[21] King Clancy Foundation Outstanding Performance   Ontario 2007   Canada
High Performance Coach of the Year Province of Ontario Coach of the Year, Wheelchair Athletics   Ontario 2007   Canada
International Achievement Award Government of Canada Achievement Award   Canada 2006   Canada
World Achievement Award Government of Canada Achievement Award   Canada 2006   Canada
National Achievement Award Government of Canada Achievement Award   Canada 2006   Canada
Provincial Achievement Award Province of Ontario Achievement Award   Ontario 2006   Canada
International Achievement Award Government of Canada Achievement Award   Canada 2000   Canada
World Achievement Award Government of Canada Achievement Award   Canada 2000   Canada
Celebration 88 Medal Government of Canada Achievement Award   Canada 1988   Canada
International Achievement Award Government of Canada Achievement Award   Canada 1988   Canada
JFO Recognition Multi Governments Awards   United Kingdom  United States 1991   United Kingdom  United States
World Award Government of Canada Achievement Award   Canada 1988   Canada
National Achievement Award Government of Canada Achievement Award   Canada 1988   Canada
Provincial Achievement Award Province of Ontario Achievement Award   Ontario 1988   Canada

FilmographyEdit

Live streamingEdit

Year Title Role Notes
2007-2017 Canadian Curling Association - National Championships Producer/Commentator Credited

FilmEdit

Year Title Role Notes
2005 Murderball Athlete Uncredited

TelevisionEdit

Year Title Role Notes
2000 CBC Sports - Sydney Paralympics Games Coverage Athlete - Team Canada Rugby
Credited
2006 CBC Sports - Torino Paralympics Games Coverage Athlete - Skip - Team Canada Curling
Credited
2010 CBC Sports - Vancouver Paralympics Games Coverage Commentator Sports Broadcaster
Credited
2010 Olympic Broadcasting Services - Vancouver, Canada Paralympics Games Coverage Commentator Sports Broadcaster
Credited
2014 CBC Sports - Sochi, Russia Paralympic Games Coverage Commentator Sports Broadcaster
Credited
2018 CBC Sports - PyeongChang, South Korea Paralympic Games Coverage Commentator Sports Broadcaster
Credited
2018 CBC Sports - Ledux, Alberta, Canada Wheelchair National Championships Coverage Commentator Sports Broadcaster
Credited
2020 CBC Sports - Tokyo, Japan, Olympic - Paralympic Games Coverage'' Commentator Sports Broadcaster
Scheduled

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Vancouver 2010 "Paralympic Perspectives" Archived February 3, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ a b "2007 Canadian Wheelchair Curling Championships" (PDF). wheelchaircurling.com. Retrieved 29 November 2010.
  3. ^ Times Online
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ [2][permanent dead link]
  6. ^ a b [3]
  7. ^ [4]
  8. ^ [5]
  9. ^ [6]
  10. ^ [https://www.wcblog2.com}[permanent dead link]
  11. ^ Team Canada – Wheelchair curling
  12. ^ [7]
  13. ^ [8]
  14. ^ [9]
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Chris Daw". Paralympic.org. International Paralympic Committee.
  16. ^ a b c d [10]
  17. ^ a b c d [11]
  18. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-07-19. Retrieved 2010-12-31.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  19. ^ [12]
  20. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-07-06. Retrieved 2010-12-31.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  21. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-10-10. Retrieved 2010-12-31.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

External linksEdit