Cho Jung-tai (Chinese: 卓榮泰; pinyin: Zhuó Róngtài; born 22 January 1959) is a Taiwanese politician who currently serves as the Chairman of the Democratic Progressive Party. He served on the Taipei City Council from 1990 to 1998, when he was first elected to the Legislative Yuan. Cho remained a legislator through 2004, when he was appointed deputy secretary-general to the president during the Chen Shui-bian administration. During Frank Hsieh's 2008 presidential bid, Cho assumed the post of Secretary-General of the Democratic Progressive Party. He returned to public service in 2017, as secretary-general of the Executive Yuan under Premier William Lai. In 2019, Cho succeeded Tsai Ing-wen as leader of the Democratic Progressive Party.

Cho Jung-tai
卓榮泰
2007TaipeiAudioVideoFair JTCho.jpg
Chairman of the Democratic Progressive Party
Assumed office
9 January 2019
Preceded byTsai Ing-wen
Lin Yu-chang (acting)
Secretary-General of the Executive Yuan
In office
8 September 2017 – 28 December 2018
PremierWilliam Lai
Preceded byChen Mei-ling
Succeeded byLi Meng-yen
Secretary-General of the Democratic Progressive Party
In office
15 October 2007 – 15 January 2008
ChairpersonChen Shui-bian
Preceded byLin Chia-lung
Succeeded byLee Ying-yuan
Secretary-General of the President of the Republic of China (acting)
In office
21 May 2007 – 19 August 2007
Preceded byChiou I-jen
Succeeded byYeh Chu-lan
Member of the Legislative Yuan
In office
1 February 1999 – 19 May 2004
ConstituencyTaipei 1
Personal details
Born (1959-01-22) 22 January 1959 (age 60)
Taipei City, Taiwan
NationalityTaiwan
Political partyDemocratic Progressive Party
Other political
affiliations
Kuomintang
Alma materNational Chung Hsing University
ProfessionPolitician

Early life and educationEdit

Cho was born in Taipei, Taiwan. He obtained his bachelor's degree in law from National Chung Hsing University.[1][2]

Political careerEdit

Cho was a member of the Kuomintang.[3] Cho launched his career in politics as a city council aide to Frank Hsieh during his tenure in the Taipei City Council.[4] He was later elected as member of the Taipei City Council from 1990 to 1998.[1] Following two terms as city councillor, Cho was elected to the Legislative Yuan in 1998 and 2001.[5] He vacated the position in May 2004, succeeding Chen Che-nan as deputy secretary-general to President Chen Shui-bian.[6][7] He was appointed spokesperson of the Executive Yuan in January 2005.[1] In January 2006, Cho resumed his previous post as deputy-secretary general within the presidential office.[8] Cho was appointed Secretary-General of the Democratic Progressive Party in October 2007.[9] He was replaced shortly following Frank Hsieh's loss in the presidential elections in March 2008.

Cho was appointed Secretary-General of the Executive Yuan in September 2017, and took office with the inauguration of the William Lai cabinet.[10][11] In December 2018, Cho announced his intention to contest the DPP chairmanship vacated by Tsai Ing-wen after the DPP's landslide defeat in the local elections of 2018.[12] The leadership election was held on 6 January 2019.[13] During the contest, Cho received support from party heavyweights among the "middle generation" or "Wild Lily generation," including endorsements from Cheng Wen-tsan, Lin Chia-lung, Chen Chi-mai, Huang Wei-cher, Lin Chih-chien, Weng Chang-liang and Pan Men-an.[14] The Democratic Progressive Party reported that voter turnout was 16.9%. Cho won 24,699 votes total, and 72.6% of all votes cast.[15][16] Cho took office on 9 January 2019, when the electoral results were formally announced.[17][18]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Chang, Rich (30 January 2005). "New Cabinet spokesman Cho always ready to serve". Taipei Times. Retrieved 15 December 2018.
  2. ^ "CHO Jung-tai, Secretary-General, Executive Yuan". Executive Yuan, Republic of China (Taiwan). Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  3. ^ Pan, Jason (29 August 2019). "Tseng appointment sparks DPP row". Taipei Times. Retrieved 28 August 2019.
  4. ^ "Cho Jung-tai (4)". Legislative Yuan.
  5. ^ "DPP to have two-person race in chairman by-election". Taiwan News. Central News Agency. Retrieved 15 December 2018.
  6. ^ Lin, Chieh-yu (12 May 2004). "Su Tseng-chang to take Presidential Office reins". Taipei Times. Retrieved 15 December 2018.
  7. ^ Lin, Chieh-yu (23 May 2004). "Good appointments, good politics: analysts". Taipei Times. Retrieved 15 December 2018.
  8. ^ Chiu, Yu-Tzu (24 January 2006). "Mark Chen confirmed as Presidential Office head". Taipei Times. Retrieved 15 December 2018.
  9. ^ Ko, Shu-ling (16 October 2007). "Chen Shui-bian announces party appointments". Taipei Times. Retrieved 15 December 2018.
  10. ^ Chen, Wei-han (6 September 2017). "Lai starts reshuffle of Executive Yuan". Taipei Times. Retrieved 15 December 2018.
  11. ^ Chen, Wei-han (8 September 2017). "Lai to replace two Cabinet ministers, retain all others". Taipei Times. Retrieved 15 December 2018.
  12. ^ Yang, Chun-hui (15 December 2018). "Cabinet official joins DPP race". Taipei Times. Retrieved 15 December 2018.
  13. ^ Yeh, Su-ping; Kao, Evelyn (6 January 2019). "DPP holds chairman by-election". Central News Agency. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  14. ^ "Cabinet official joins DPP race". Taipei Times. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  15. ^ Wang, Flor (6 January 2019). "Cho Jung-tai elected DPP chairman". Central News Agency. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  16. ^ Yang, Chun-hui (7 January 2019). "DPP picks Cho Jung-tai as new party chairman". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  17. ^ Huang, Tzu-ti (6 January 2018). "Pro-Tsai candidate claims victory as new leader of Taiwan's DPP". Taiwan News. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  18. ^ "DPP chairman planning to establish platform for policy brainstorming". Taipei Times. 9 January 2019. Retrieved 9 January 2019.