China Press (simplified Chinese: 中国报; traditional Chinese: 中國報; pinyin: Zhōngguó Bào) is a Malaysian Chinese-language newspaper set up by Henry Lee Hau Shik[3] and first published on 1 February 1946 in Kuala Lumpur.[4]

China Press
Logo of China Press Malaysia1.png
Logo of China Press Malaysia2.png
TypeDaily newspaper
FormatBroadsheet
Owner(s)The China Press Berhad
Founder(s)Henry Lee Hau Shik
Founded1 February 1946
LanguageMandarin
HeadquartersKuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Circulation154,538 (daily)
48,207 (Night Edition)
9,686 (daily E-paper)
*Source: Audit Bureau of Circulations, Malaysia - July to December 2015[1][2]
Websitewww.chinapress.com.my

On 13 May 1969, China Press was suspended for a month following its publication of a court news item after the 13 May Incident.

China Press relaunched in 1986, and by 1988, its daily circulation had increased from 20,000 to 100,000, making it the fastest-growing paper in Malaysia. Today, its daily circulation of about 154,000 makes it the second best selling Chinese daily newspaper in Malaysia. Its Night edition paper is the most popular[5] in Malaysia with a circulation of about 48,000.

Due to its popularity in Malaysia, China Press launched their evening version on 19 May 1990 with the mission statement of Today News Tonight Know.

In 1993, Nanyang Press took over the management of China Press.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-09-18. Retrieved 2016-07-19.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-09-18. Retrieved 2016-07-19.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ Mariana Isa; Maganjeet Kaur (15 September 2015). Kuala Lumpur Street Names: A Guide to Their Meanings and Histories. Marshall Cavendish International Asia Pte Ltd. pp. 596–. ISBN 978-981-4721-44-8.
  4. ^ Weibu Peng (2005). Southeast Asian Chinese Newspaper Research. Social Science Literature Press. pp. 53–. ISBN 978-7-80190-570-3.
  5. ^ Note that in Malaysia, only Chinese language newspapers publishes at night.

External linksEdit