Chester and Cheshire (Constituencies) Act 1542

Chester and Cheshire (Constituencies) Act 1542 (34 & 35 Henry VIII c. 13) is the Act of Parliament allowing Cheshire to be represented in the Parliament of England. The county palatine of Chester, ruled by the earls of Chester, was established by William the Conqueror. Cheshire had its own parliament, consisting of barons of the county, and was not represented in the parliament of England. After the passing of the act Cheshire retained some of its special privileges until 1830. The earldom of Chester is traditionally vested in the sovereign's eldest son upon his crowning as Prince of Wales.

Chester and Cheshire (Constituencies) Act 1542
Long titleAn Act for Knights and Burgesses to have Places in the Parliament for the County Palatine and City of Chester
Citation34 & 35 Henry VIII c. 13
Territorial extent Kingdom of England
Dates
Commencement1 October 1543
Repealed30 July 1948
Other legislation
Repealed byRepresentation of the People Act 1948
Status: Repealed
Text of statute as originally enacted

The Act was repealed by section 80 of, and Schedule 13 to, the Representation of the People Act 1948 (c.65).

ReferencesEdit

  • 34 & 35 Henry VIII c. 13, An Act for Knights and Burgesses to have Places in the Parliament for the County Palatine and City of Chester — in Raithby, John; Tomlins, Sir Thomas Edlyne (1811). The statutes at large, of England and of Great Britain: from Magna Carta to the union of the kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 3: 1509–53. London: Printed by George Eyre and Andrew Strahan. (Full text of the Act as passed, from Google Books scan)