Coordinates: 51°29′43″N 0°8′59″W / 51.49528°N 0.14972°W / 51.49528; -0.14972

Chester Square
St Michael's Church, Chester Square

Chester Square is an elongated residential garden square[a] in London's Belgravia district. It presents with sister squares: Belgrave and Eaton Squares the garden squares directed to be built by the Grosvenor family when allowing the development of the main part of this semi-rural part of Westminster, being known thenceforth as Belgravia, in the 19th century; the family's trust has retained minor but overarching legal interests in the land, after long-leasing instead of selling as freehold the houses, that is have kept the reversions of most of Belgravia and Mayfair. The square is named after the city of Chester, the market town nearest Eaton Hall, the ancestral home of the Grosvenor family.[1]

№32 was used as a backdrop for video accompanying Morrissey's track "Suedehead".

The whole except №s 80a, 81, 81a, 82, 83 and 83a (so №s 1–13 and 14–23, 24–32, 37–39, 42–45, 45a, 45b, 65–76 and 77–80, 80a, and 84–88 and the Mews Arch) is listed Grade II for architectural merit.[2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9]

The (private, communal) gardens are Grade II listed on the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens.[10][11]

St Michael's ChurchEdit

The Anglican church of Saint Michael in Chester Square was built in 1844 along with the rest of the square, and consecrated two years later. The Ecclesiologist magazine criticised the opening, saying it was "an attempt - but happily a most unsuccessful one - to find a Protestant development of the Christian styles".[citation needed] The church is in the late Decorated Gothic style, with an exterior of Kentish Ragstone. The architect was Thomas Cundy the younger.[12]

Notable residentsEdit

Rev. Can. W H Elliott, a broadcaster on religious matters for the BBC, and known as "the Radio Chaplain", was vicar of St Michael's in the mid-20th century.[14]

Footnotes and ReferencesEdit

Footnotes
  1. ^ 840 feet by 150 feet plus three short approach ways, one of which has extreme numbers 82 to 88 opposing 80a to 81a. The landmark square including roads thus measures 2.89 acres (building to building), of which the green area is 1.25 acres less bisecting Eccleston Street (0.07 between the greens).
Citations
  1. ^ Walford, Edward (1878). 'The western suburbs: Belgravia', Old and New London. pp. 1–14. Retrieved 2009-12-03.
  2. ^ Historic England, "1–13 Chester Square (1357284)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 February 2016
  3. ^ Historic England, "14–23 Chester Square (1219270)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 February 2016
  4. ^ Historic England, "24–32 Chester Square (1066274)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 February 2016
  5. ^ Historic England, "37–39 Chester Square (1066275)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 February 2016
  6. ^ Historic England, "42–45 Chester Square (1219286)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 February 2016
  7. ^ Historic England, "65–76 Chester Square (1219297)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 February 2016
  8. ^ Historic England, "Nos 77 to 80 (consec), 80a and Mews Arch, Chester Square (1066276)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 February 2016
  9. ^ Historic England, "84-88 Chester Square (1219312)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 February 2016
  10. ^ "Chester Square". London Gardens Online. Retrieved 16 February 2016.
  11. ^ Historic England, "Chester Square (1001675)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 16 February 2016
  12. ^ Ben Weinreb and Christopher Hibbert. The London Encyclopaedia (1992 ed.). Macmillan. p. 770. ISBN 0-333-57688-8.
  13. ^ Faithfull, Marianne (1995). Faithfull. Penguin. p. 182. ISBN 0-14-024653-3.
  14. ^ Wilson, Alyson. "Church History & Guide" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 July 2014. Retrieved 25 July 2014.